Cases reported "Head Injuries, Closed"

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11/47. Facial fractures and related injuries: a ten-year retrospective analysis.

    A retrospective analysis of 828 patients with significant midface or mandibular fractures was undertaken to illustrate the multisystem nature of traumatic injuries associated with fracture of the facial skeleton, covering the period from 1985 to 1994. Special emphasis was placed on determining associated injuries sustained as well as epidemiological information. The experience presented differs from other large series in the literature in that the predominant mechanism of injury is motor vehicle accidents (67%) rather than assaults. Of the patients reviewed, 89% sustained significant associated injuries. Closed head trauma with documented loss of consciousness was noted most frequently (40%), followed by extremity fractures (33%), thoracic trauma (29%), and traumatic brain injuries (25%). Only 11% of patients sustained facial fractures without concomitant injury.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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12/47. Unexpected delayed rupture of the vertebral-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms following closed head injury.

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to closed head injury is rarely associated with traumatic aneurysms of the posterior circulation. We report two cases of ruptured vertebral-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (VA-pica) pseudoaneurysms following closed head injuries. In each case, there was no associated penetrating injury or skull fracture. The first patient was kicked followed by disturbed consciousness. The computerized tomography (CT) scan on admission and cerebral angiography on the 11th day after the trauma revealed a massive subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with pan-ventricular haemorrhage and an aneurysm of the right pica near its origin. Further ruptures occurred on the 12th, 15th, and 66th day, and he died on the 69th day. The second patient complained of persistent headache and nausea following a fight on the previous day. A CT scan and angiography on the 1st day after the trauma showed posterior fossa SAH with fourth ventricular blood and a tiny protrusion of the left VA-pica. On the 14th day, repeated angiography revealed a remarkable growth of the aneurysm, followed by the second rupture. The repair of the VA-pica junction was urgently performed with successful exclusion of the aneurysm. To our knowledge, only eight cases of traumatic aneurysms located at the VA or the pica near its origin have been reported. When intraventricular blood is found with massive subarachnoid blood or with posterior fossa SAH, this ominous complication should be considered. Traumatic VA-pica pseudoaneurysms are curable by refined microsurgical techniques, if diagnosed in time.
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ranking = 6.1893362874317
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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13/47. Traumatic fracture of the stapes suprastructure following minor head injury.

    Traumatic fracture of the stapes occurs rarely following head injury. Ossicular dislocation is more commonly encountered. When present, stapes fractures are usually associated with an underlying temporal bone fracture. A higher incidence has been reported in childhood, possibly because of the greater flexibility of the skull in this age group. This report highlights the fact that these fractures can be associated with a relatively minor head injury. This possibility should be kept in mind when evaluating patients, especially children, who have a persistent conductive deafness of more than 30 dB with an intact tympanic membrane following any form of head injury. An exploratory tympanotomy with appropriate ossicular reconstruction, as described in this case, can yield excellent results.
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ranking = 1.0304751559031
keywords = fracture, skull
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14/47. Posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid accumulation within the eyelid: a case report and review of the literature.

    history AND PRESENTATION. A case of a 3-year-old child with a right upper pulsatile eyelid swelling following a falling injury 3 months before is described. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a fracture of the orbital roof, a basofrontal dural tear and a direct communication of the cystic cavity with the subarachnoid space. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME. The patient underwent dural repair for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and was discharged in good health.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = fracture
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15/47. Growing skull fracture of the posterior cranial fossa and of the orbital roof.

    BACKGROUND: Growing skull fractures (GSF) are rare complications of head trauma, primarily reported in infancy and early childhood. GSF are commonly located on calvaria, and rarely in other locations, including the skull base. METHOD: In this study, we report two cases of GSF occurring in unusual locations. The first, a 8-month old girl, with a GSF of the suboccipital posterior fossa region, and the second, a 4-year old boy with a GSF of the right orbital roof. Both cases underwent operative treatment of the GSF, with microsurgical dissection and excision of the protruding gliotic brain tissue, watertight duraplasty and autologous bone cranial repair. The authors conducted a medline search of the relevant English literature from 1966 to 2002. FINDINGS: From the search, three cases of suboccipital posterior fossa region GSF and twelve series of orbital GSF, describing a total of 22 cases, have been found. INTERPRETATION: A survey of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this entity in these locations is reported. A review of suboccipital posterior fossa and orbital roof GSF cases, of nosological, ophthalmological and neurological data, neuroradiological and operative findings, and results of different treatment strategies are described.
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ranking = 24.78782030563
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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16/47. Growing-fracture of the orbital roof with post-traumatic encephalocele in an adult patient. Case report.

    Growing fractures are a rare entity, usually occurring in paediatric age. Localisation at the orbital region is even rarer. We report the case of a growing fracture of the orbital roof with post-traumatic encephalocele in an adult patient, the 1(st) similar case in adulthood at our knowledge. Clinical and neuroimaging aspects are described, underlining the role of MRI in displaying intraorbital encephalocele. Surgical treatment with relevant technical notes is discussed as well.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = fracture
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17/47. Blunt basal head trauma: aspects of unconsciousness.

    Two cases of street violence directed to the skull base level and transverse to the cervical axis are described. No skeletal damage. The violence resulted in the so-called "traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage", an often used, unspecified forensic "diagnosis"; it was here revealed to be due to rupture of the wall of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (p.i.c.a). However, this was only one of the possible explanations for the acute symptoms of unconsciousness (concussion) and almost immediate death. The careful examination of these two cases and of a series of control cases revealed that at the trauma, stress and strain may have occurred to arterial branches serving as feeding perforant vessels to the medulla oblongata; in these cases they were coursing directly from the p.i.c.a. region.--The type of direct impact has often been regarded as mild! However, its location suboccipitally as in these cases can become dangerous. The resulting direct or indirect deficit of brain stem functions are discussed in these cases as well as "concussion-related symptoms" resulting after other types of head and neck injury.
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ranking = 0.030475155903133
keywords = skull
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18/47. Growing skull fracture of the orbital roof: Report of two cases and review of the literature.

    In this report, the authors describe two cases of growing fracture of the orbital roof. The aim is to draw attention to this rare complication and discuss the role of three-dimensional computed tomography in radiological findings and surgical planning. Relevant literature is also reviewed.
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ranking = 24.882345149727
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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19/47. Uncommon cause of sinus thrombosis following closed mild head injury in a child.

    OBJECT: Sinus thrombosis following a closed mild head injury is rare. A case of dural sinus thrombosis following a mild closed head injury due to an uncommon cause is reported. methods: A 7-year-old child presented with GCS 15 after a road traffic accident. CT revealed an occipital fracture. Ten days later the child developed signs of increased intracranial pressure. An MR venogram at this time revealed thrombosis of the transverse sinus with hypoplasia of the contralateral transverse and sigmoid sinuses. The patient's anitiphospholipid antibody titres were elevated. The patient was treated with anticoagulants and improved. CONCLUSIONS: The role of inherited and acquired procoagulant factors in the aetiology of sinus thrombosis is increasingly being recognized. When a patient presents with sinus thrombosis after a closed mild head injury, it is necessary to investigate for the presence of risk factors for thrombophilia as it has implications for the long-term management of the patient.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = fracture
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20/47. Free adipofascial flap interposition for pediatric posttraumatic forearm synostosis with closed head injury.

    A case report is presented of a 12-year-old male after a motor vehicle accident: head injury and multiple fractures, including bilateral both bone forearm fractures. The patient developed bilateral extensive forearm synostosis that required release and interpositional free flap at 6 months postinjury. At 3-year follow-up, the patient has maintained full forearm rotation and reports unrestricted sports and other recreational activities.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = fracture
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