Cases reported "Head Injuries, Closed"

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21/47. Malignant cerebral infarction secondary to internal carotid injury in closed head trauma: good outcome with aggressive treatment--a case report.

    A 25-year-old male patient in whom occlusion of the internal carotid artery developed secondary to a skull base fracture is presented. The diagnosis of internal carotid artery occlusion was reached 12 hours after the admission and 17 hours after the injury. The patient was initially treated for ischemic edema and when the patient showed signs of cerebral herniation, decompressive craniectomy was necessary. The outcome was good. The clinical and radiologic characteristics of internal carotid artery occlusion in closed head injury are highlighted and treatment options are reviewed in light of pertinent literature.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture, skull
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22/47. nitric oxide inhalation is useful in the management of right ventricular failure caused by myocardial contusion.

    We report a severe head injury and blunt chest trauma with sternal and multiple rib fractures with high-energy impact in a 22-year-old man. Twelve hours after the accident, haemodynamic status of the patient rapidly worsened because of right ventricular (RV) failure due to myocardial contusion, requiring increasing doses of catecholamine. nitric oxide inhalation was used to decrease RV afterload, and produced an immediate improvement in haemodynamic status, permitting a decrease in catecholamine administration. From days 2 through 8, cardiac function continued to improve, and was normal on day 9. nitric oxide inhalation was stopped on day 4.
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ranking = 0.80398697318484
keywords = fracture
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23/47. diagnosis and treatment of orbit posttraumatic subperiosteal hemorrhage in a child, associated with a subdural intracranial hemorrhage.

    We describe a rare case of traumatic subperiosteal orbital hematoma in a child, with intracranial hemorrhagic complication. Subperiosteal hematoma are the more infrequent occurrences among intraorbital hemorrhagic lesions and can be also associated with intracranial extradural hematoma in patients with orbital roof fracture. Here, we describe a case without roof fracture but with a never-before described intracranial subdural hematoma. The patient underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in an acute state, and later, a radiologic diagnosis of percutaneous drainage of the hematoma was mad. MRI was more sensitive and specific in the evaluation of the intracranial and intraorbital complication.
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ranking = 1.6079739463697
keywords = fracture
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24/47. Fracture of skull base with delayed multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    This report describes a pediatric case of delayed glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and facial nerve palsies after a head injury. Computed tomography scan of the skull base revealed the fracture of the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the fracture involved the tip of petrous pyramid, in front of the jugular foramen. The anatomical features, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed.
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ranking = 2.5880390804455
keywords = fracture, skull
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25/47. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis associated with raised intracranial pressure in closed head injury with depressed skull fracture.

    A case of delayed signs of intracranial hypertension following closed head injury with a depressed cranial fracture and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis is reported. Conservative treatment of intracranial hypertension, including just repeated lumbar puncture and oral acetazolamide, was performed. Spontaneous recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus was observed. Pathogenesis and different modalities of treatment are discussed.
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ranking = 160.04065090135
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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26/47. Large intradiploic growing skull fracture of the posterior fossa.

    Growing skull fractures (GSFs) are rare complications of head injury and mostly occur in infancy and early childhood. Location in the posterior fossa and intradiploic development of a GSF is very uncommon. We report a 7-year-old boy with a large, 9 x 7 x 4-cm, occipital intradiploic GSF. The lesion developed progressively over a period of 5 years following a documented occipital linear fracture. This case of a GSF developing from a known occipital linear fracture demonstrates that a GSF may reach a considerable size and, although uncommon, intradiploic development and occipital localization of a GSF is possible.
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ranking = 200.65380385658
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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27/47. Traumas of the middle skull base with TMJ involvement. Case report.

    The authors report their experience with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) traumas involving breakage of the roof of the glenoid cavity, an infrequent event that occurs in those cases in which, as a result of the condylar neck not fracturing, the traumatic energy is transmitted to the middle skull base. As the literature contains no valid series for establishing standardized protocols for the treatment of these fractures, we propose our own orthopedic-functional approach. The patient observed by us had suffered a cranio-facial trauma and presented the classical symptoms and signs of TMJ traumas and complete bilateral Bell paralysis. He was subjected to a CAT scan and then to 2-stage treatment consisting of functional rest with liquid diet followed by physiotherapy. An almost total recovery in TMJ function was observed after 1 month. At 1-year follow-up the facial paralysis had resolved completely. On the basis of our experience, breakages of the glenoid cavity can be compared, in terms of treatment procedure, to intracapsular fractures of the TMJ with surgery confined to cases of ankylosis sequelae. To avoid the onset of ankylosis careful control of clinical, functional and radiological follow-up is required.
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ranking = 2.5880390804455
keywords = fracture, skull
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28/47. Occipital condyle fracture in a victim of a motor vehicle collision.

    Occipital condyle fractures are rarely reported in the emergency medicine literature. It is unclear whether these fractures are rare or under-diagnosed. Occipital condyle fractures are associated with high-energy blunt trauma with significant cranial-cervical torque or axial loading. We report a case of a female patient with an occipital condyle fracture. The patient only complained of shoulder pain, but was found to have high cervical spine tenderness, after a moderate-speed front-end motor vehicle collision. Initial cervical spine radiographs were non-diagnostic. Computed tomography of the cervical spine demonstrated a non-displaced occipital condyle fracture. Conservative management with a semi-rigid cervical collar was successful in treating this patient's fracture. A review of the literature covers the diagnosis, radiographic findings, and management of this fracture.
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ranking = 8.8438567050332
keywords = fracture
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29/47. Collet-Sicard syndrome resulting from closed head injury: case report.

    A 67-year-old man developed paralysis of the right ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth cranial nerves (Collet-Sicard syndrome) after sustaining a closed head injury. Plain x-ray films of the skull revealed two linear fractures of the occipital bone (one of them probably traversing through the right occipital condyle) and a prominent soft-tissue shadow in the region of the nasopharynx, suggestive of a skull base fracture. The patient was managed conservatively. This is the only case of unilateral multiple caudal cranial nerve palsies (IX through XII), seen by us over a 20-year period, from among more than 5,000 moderate to significant head injuries.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fracture, skull
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30/47. Occipital condyle fractures diagnosed by high-definition CT and coronal reconstructions.

    We describe four cases of fracture of the occipital condyle. In all cases plain cervical spine films were normal. The fracture was diagnosed on the lowest section of a routine CT examination of the head. Further detail was then obtained with high-definition CT and coronal reconstructions. All the patients were found to have a small atlanto-occipital subluxation, no greater than 11 mm. classification and treatment of these fractures is discussed. It is stressed that the lower-most section of a CT head study for cerebral trauma should include the inferior margin of the foramen magnum and that both bone and soft tissue images should be obtained.
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ranking = 5.6279088122938
keywords = fracture
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