Cases reported "Head and Neck Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/236. head and neck teratomas in children.

    A retrospective review of seven patients with teratomas of the head and neck treated at out center over the past 5 years, which represented 2% of all teratomas (sacrococcygeal, ovarian, and retroperitoneal) seen over the past 20 years, was performed. After investigation to exclude associated anomalies, all but one of the children underwent surgery for removal of the tumour. All excised tumours were subjected to histopathological examination to confirm their teratomatous nature. The patients were followed up at regular intervals for up to 4 years. The patients' ages ranged from newborn to 2.5 years. There were three cervical, two oral, and two skull teratomas. The youngest patient had a cervical teratoma with respiratory compromise, requiring tracheal intubation. All but one patient (skull teratoma) had excision of the tumours with a satisfactory outcome. Histopathological examination of the excised tumours showed mature tissue from the three germinal layers in all specimens. Specific components included glandular epithelium, keratinising epithelium, and muscle fibres. Follow-up did not show any recurrence in the operated children. The three with cervical teratomas had normal levels of thyroid hormone postoperatively. head and neck teratomas in children are mostly benign lesions amenable to curative excision. In cervical teratomas airway management takes priority.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/236. Pitfalls in the interpretation of MIBG scans in cervical neuroblastoma.

    Cervical neuroblastoma (CNB) is relatively rare, accounting for less than 5% of these tumors. Because it arises from the cervical sympathetic chain, complete resection will leave the child with Horner's syndrome in a high proportion of cases. Advances in technology have allowed for the development of diagnostic and imaging modalities more specific to the disease. One of these has been the advent of radiolabeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) to assess the primary tumor and focal metastatic involvement. This nuclide is also taken up by normal salivary-gland tissue; this may be altered, however, in the presence of sympathetic denervation. We present a case of a primary CNB associated with Horner's syndrome, which led to confusion in interpretation of the subsequent MIBG scan. We alert the reader to potential pitfalls in the use of this examination in this disease entity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/236. Glandular malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: an unusual case showing histologically malignant glands.

    In this report, we describe a highly unusual case of glandular malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a neck mass in a previously healthy 29-year-old man. Grossly, the tumor was found to arise from a swollen peripheral nerve trunk. The tumor was largely composed of spindle cells that demonstrated marked nuclear pleomorphism and numerous abnormal mitotic figures. In addition, histologically malignant glandular structures lined by simple nonciliated columnar cells with goblet cells were found clustered in the center of the tumor. Examination of the swollen peripheral nerve trunk revealed the presence of a plexiform neurofibroma. The spindle cells were positive for S100. The glands were negative for S100 but positive for keratin, epithelial membrane antigen, and neuroendocrine markers (somatostatin, chromogranin, Leu-7, and calcitonin). This patient was subsequently diagnosed as having von Recklinghausen disease and died of tumor metastasis to the lungs 34 months after the presentation. To our knowledge, only 3 similar cases have been previously described in the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/236. actinomyces and actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-actinomyces-associated lymphadenopathy mimicking lymphoma.

    We present 2 unusual cases of long-standing, extensive reactive lymphadenopathy secondary to actinomyces infection, 1 of which was also accompanied by actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-actinomyces complex infection. To our knowledge, histologic features of lymph node involvement by these organisms have not been previously reported in the literature. One patient had extensive cervical, posterior mediastinal, and abdominal lymphadenopathy. The second patient presented with a submandibular mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Clinical features strongly suggested lymphoma. The histologic examination of the lymph nodes from both patients revealed reactive follicular hyperplasia, marked interfollicular and capsular fibrosis, and multiple interfollicular microabscesses. Characteristic actinomyces colonies were identified at the center of the microabscesses in deep sections. Cultures were obtained from the lymph nodes of 1 patient, and were positive for A actinomycetemcomitans. Both patients had poor dental hygiene. Lymphadenopathy subsided with antibiotic therapy and appropriate dental care.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.596749934813
keywords = submandibular
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/236. Secondary malignant lymphoma which simulated primary thyroid cancer.

    A patient with secondary thyroid lymphoma who complained of a neck mass was presented. Multiple nodules were detected in both lobes of the thyroid gland, which appeared as homogeneous hypoechoic masses on ultrasonogarphy (US), low-density masses on computed tomography (CT), and areas of increased uptake on gallium-67 scintigraphy. The residual thyroid gland was normal. Surgery established a diagnosis of secondary thyroid lymphoma with no coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis but with cervical node involvement by lymphoma. Radiologic evidence of normal residual thyroid gland in a patient with thyroid lymphoma may be a sign of secondary thyroid lymphoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/236. Second malignant neoplasms of the head and neck in survivors of retinoblastoma.

    retinoblastoma is a malignant tumor of the embryonic retina. Although it is rare, it is the most common primary eye tumor of childhood. life expectancy following treatment is now excellent, but survivors who have heritable retinoblastoma face an increased risk of a second malignant head or neck neoplasm. A second neoplasm, which often occurs in the irradiated field of the original tumor, has become the most significant threat to the survival of these patients. We report the case of a young girl who was cured of her retinoblastoma only to later develop a second nonocular tumor that metastasized to the superficial parotid gland. She underwent a superficial parotidectomy and neck dissection, but the malignancy eventually recurred and required further surgery and radiation therapy. In this article, we discuss the etiology, incidence, sites of occurrence, and management options for a second malignant neoplasm in retinoblastoma survivors. The head and neck surgeon must be vigilant in the diagnosis and management of second neoplasms in this patient population because they often occur in irradiated fields; surgical management is important to patient survival.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/236. Haemangiopericytoma of infratemporal fossa.

    Haemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare vascular tumours that commonly involve the soft tissues of the trunk and lower extremities. In the head and neck, the most common sites are the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses, and unusually, the orbital region, the parotid gland, and the neck. We report a patient with HPC that originated in the infratemporal fossa and involved the pterygopalatine and the middle cranial fossae, apparently the first such case to be reported. Although the patient has undergone resection on three separate occasions, the tumour recurred. We then performed an extended resection using the infratemporal fossa approach type D. The patient has shown no recurrence in the past five years. Although histopathologic confirmation of this malignancy may be difficult, extensive resection remains the most effective treatment in such cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/236. Ectopic parathyroid adenomas located at the carotid bifurcation: the role of preoperative Tc-99m MIBI scintigraphy and the intraoperative gamma probe procedure in surgical treatment planning.

    PURPOSE: The prevalence of ectopic parathyroid adenoma (PA) is relatively low, despite some studies in which it has been reported to be as high as 20%. Ectopic PA is a frequent cause of surgical failure, and therefore some authors recommend preoperative imaging to localize the condition in patients with primary hyperparathyroid (HPT) disease before initial surgery. methods: Two unusual cases of primary HPT caused by an ectopic PA located at the carotid bifurcation are reported. The patients were examined before operation using Tc-99m MIBI scintigraphy and then underwent radioguided surgery using the intraoperative gamma probe technique with injection of a low dose (37 MBq; 1 mCi) of Tc-99m MIBI. RESULTS: The first patient had a history of primary HPT and coexisting multinodular goiter. She had undergone total thyroidectomy in another center, but no enlarged parathyroid gland was found at bilateral neck exploration and serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels remained elevated after intervention. The patient was referred to our center. A Tc-99m MIBI scan showed a focus of abnormal tracer uptake in the superior left laterocervical region that was thought to be a PA. The next day she underwent radioguided surgery and an 18-mm PA located at the left carotid bifurcation was easily removed through a 2.5-cm skin incision. The second patient was examined in our center before surgery. A neck ultrasound showed a multinodular goiter but no enlarged parathyroid glands. A pertechnectate-MIBI subtraction scan revealed a focus of abnormal Tc-99m MIBI uptake in the right superior laterocervical region that was thought to be a PA. One week later, at radioguided surgery, a 25-mm PA was identified at the right carotid bifurcation and removed successfully. CONCLUSIONS: These data strongly support the utility of preoperative imaging with Tc-99m MIBI in patients with primary HPT before initial neck exploration with the aim of avoiding surgical failure. Furthermore, the intraoperative gamma probe technique seems to be useful to reduce surgical trauma and, possibly, complications in patients with ectopic PA.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/236. Primary cutaneous adenoid cystic carcinoma with regional lymph node metastasis.

    Primary cutaneous adenoid cystic carcinoma (PCACC) is a particularly rare variant of sweat gland carcinoma with characteristics of indolent and progressive course and high incidence of perineural invasion and local recurrence. However, regional lymph node metastasis in PCACC is exceedingly rare and its prognostic implication is unknown. Only two previous cases of recurrent scalp PCACC were reported to be associated with cervical lymph node metastases at 42 months and 20 years, respectively, after the initial treatment. We present a case of PCACC occurring in the left parotid region with regional neck lymph node metastasis in a 64-year-old man. Because the occurrence of lymph node metastasis seems to be associated with recurrent PCACC, we suggest that neck dissection may be included in the treatment for recurrent PCACC patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/236. Significance and management of thyroid lesions in lymph nodes as an incidental finding during neck dissection.

    BACKGROUND: The incidental discovery of thyroid lesions in lymph nodes during a lymph node dissection performed for a separate primary head and neck tumor is an unusual clinical entity. Its discovery has led to controversy regarding its significance and management. methods: We identified five patients over the years 1991-1999 with this finding. All five patients were subsequently treated with a total thyroidectomy and a level VI lymph node dissection. RESULTS: Pathological examination revealed three papillary carcinomas and level VI lymph node metastases in the two patients who had carcinoma in their thyroid glands. All five patients are presently free of their primary and thyroid disease on follow-up examinations. CONCLUSIONS: These patients should be addressed with additional work-up and surgery if metastatic thyroid cancer is documented in the lymph node. We offer a diagnostic algorithm that may aid in further work-up and treatment in these unusual cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gland
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Head and Neck Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.