Cases reported "Headache"

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1/164. Persistent bilateral hearing loss after shunt placement for hydrocephalus. Case report.

    Transient hearing decrease following loss of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported in patients undergoing lumbar puncture, spinal anesthesia, myelography, and/or different neurosurgical interventions. The authors present the first well-documented case of a patient with persistent bilateral low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss after shunt placement for hydrocephalus and discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms including the role of the cochlear aqueduct. These findings challenge the opinion that hearing decreases after loss of CSF are always transient. The authors provide a suggestion for treatment.
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2/164. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient with classic presentation of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and subsequent improvement with targeted epidural blood patch. methods: Report of one case and review of the literature. RESULTS: Examination of cerebrospinal fluid after lumbar puncture disclosed a reduced opening pressure, an increased level of protein, and lymphocytic pleocytosis. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium showed diffuse enhancement of the pachymeninges, no evidence of leptomeningeal enhancement, and chronic subdural fluid collection. Radionuclide cisternography demonstrated reduced activity over the cerebral convexities, early accumulation of radiotracer in the urinary bladder, and direct evidence of leakage at the cervicothoracic junction (C7-T1). Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Therapy with a targeted epidural blood patch resulted in the rapid resolution of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In this report, we describe a classic case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension in a 63-year-old man with an initial presentation of postural headaches, blurred vision, pain in the left eye, diplopia on left gaze, and neck soreness.
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3/164. Use of cervical spine manipulation under anesthesia for management of cervical disk herniation, cervical radiculopathy, and associated cervicogenic headache syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the benefits of cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia as an approach to treating a patient with chronic cervical disk herniation, associated cervical radiculopathy, and cervicogenic headache syndrome. CLINICAL FEATURES: The patient had neck pain with radiating paresthesia into the right upper extremity and incapacitating headaches and had no response to 6 months of conservative therapy. Treatment included spinal manipulative therapy, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, and acupuncture. magnetic resonance imaging, electromyography, and somatosensory evoked potential examination all revealed positive diagnostic findings. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: Treatment included 3 successive days of cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia. The patient had immediate relief after the first procedure. Her neck and arm pain were reported to be 50% better after the first trial, and her headaches were better by 80% after the third trial. Four months after the last procedure the patient reported a 95% improvement in her overall condition. CONCLUSION: Cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia has a place in the chiropractic arena. It is a useful tool for treating chronic discopathic disease complicated by cervical radiculopathy and cervicogenic headache syndrome. The beneficial results of this procedure are contingent on careful patient selection and proper training of qualified chiropractic physicians.
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4/164. Low-pressure shunt 'malfunction' following lumbar puncture in children with shunted obstructive hydrocephalus.

    Most shunt malfunctions present with signs and symptoms of high intracranial pressure, and computed tomography scans demonstrate ventricular enlargement. However, several authors have described a rare 'low-pressure' hydrocephalic state in which ventricular enlargement can occur in the face of low, or even negative, intracranial pressures. We report 2 children with obstructive hydrocephalus in whom this 'low-pressure state' followed a lumbar puncture; in both children, the shunts were functioning properly despite increased ventricular size on computed tomography scans, and all symptoms resolved (and the ventricles returned to baseline) following a period of enforced recumbency without shunt revision. We hypothesize that subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the puncture site in the lumbar theca decreases the intracranial pressures globally to a point below the opening pressures of the shunt valves. The ventricular cerebrospinal fluid, unable to be drained through either the subarachnoid space or the shunt, accumulates within the ventricular system under low pressure. One consistent feature in our 2 patients has been the postural nature of the headaches. We recommend enforced recumbency and, if necessary, a blood patch to seal the lumbar leakage. Shunt revision or prolonged external ventricular drainage appears to be unnecessary in these patients. Finally, neurosurgeons should be aware of this potential complication.
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5/164. MRI findings in lumbar puncture headache syndrome: abnormal dural-meningeal and dural venous sinus enhancement.

    intracranial hypotension (IH) is a treatable cause of persistent headaches. Persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak at a lumbar puncture (LP) site may cause IH. We present postcontrast MRI of a patient with post-lumbar-puncture headache (LPHA) showing abnormal, intense, diffuse, symmetric, contiguous dural-meningeal (pachymeningeal) enhancement of the supratentorial and infratentorial intracranial dura, including convexities, interhemispheric fissure, tentorium, and falx. MRI also showed abnormal dural venous sinus enhancement, a new finding in LPHA, suggesting compensatory venous expansion. Thus, IH and venodilatation may play a role in the development of LPHA.
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6/164. Treatment for postdural puncture headache associated with late postpartum eclampsia.

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is the most common complication of accidental or deliberate dural puncture. It also occurs after epidural or spinal analgesia for labor and delivery. Treatment may be conservative with analgesics and/or caffeine. Definitive treatment can be accomplished with an epidural blood patch (EBP). We present a case of postpartum convulsions which were temporally related to a caffeine infusion and an EBP.
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7/164. Eosinophilic meningitis. An unusual cause of headache.

    Human parasitic infections are uncommon outside the tropical north but common in animals throughout australia. The rat lung worm, angiostrongylus cantonensis, can invade the human brain to cause a chronic meningitis with prolonged headache. This condition can be diagnosed by finding a high eosinophil count in cerebrospinal fluid (CFS), the lumbar puncture also provides symptomatic relief. The outcome is usually benign but death has been reported.
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8/164. New-onset headache in an adolescent with MASS syndrome.

    A 15-year-old girl with the "MASS" phenotype (meeting several of the minor criteria for marfan syndrome) presents with a new onset low-pressure postural headache. Clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging suggested intracranial hypotension, which was confirmed with lumbar puncture. The pathophysiology and treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension are discussed.
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9/164. Relief of postural post dural puncture headache by an epidural blood patch 12 months after dural puncture.

    A 20-year-old previously healthy male presented at the pain clinic with chronic headache of about one year duration. Clinical examination revealed no pathological manifestations. During the consultation the patient was drinking coca-cola. On direct questioning he told that drinking coca-cola gave partial relief from the headache, and that the headache started after he had received two spinal anaesthetics for treatment of a lower leg fracture. Postural post dural puncture headache was now suspected and an epidural blood patch performed. Despite an interval of nearly 12 months since the dural punctures, a single epidural blood patch completely relieved the headache. This case history demonstrates that an epidural blood patch should be tried if a chronic post dural puncture headache is suspected.
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ranking = 11
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10/164. Successful epidural blood patch in a patient with headache for 6 months after lumbar root decompression.

    Prolonged headache following dural puncture is an uncommon problem that may occur after a spinal tap, often as a complication of epidural anaesthesia. This problem has also been described after long-term epidural or spinal anaesthesia, myelography or spinal surgery. A case of prolonged postdural puncture headache following lumbar nerve root decompression is described in a healthy young man. No other cause could be found either clinically or with the aid of scanning by computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging techniques at the spinal level involved. The symptoms were successfully treated with an epidural blood patch performed seven months following the original surgical operation.
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