Cases reported "Hearing Disorders"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. Long-term follow-up of auditory agnosia as a sequel of herpes encephalitis in a child.

    We report a pediatric patient with auditory agnosia as a sequel of herpes encephalitis. His early development was completely normal. He uttered three words at 12 months old. disease onset was 1 year and 2 months of age. He was discharged from the hospital seemingly with no sequel; however, he could not recover his intelligible words even at age 2 years. He was diagnosed as having auditory agnosia caused by bilateral temporal lobe injury. We began to train him at once, individually and intensively. adult patients with pure auditory agnosia followed by two episodes of temporal lobe infarction have impairment in central hearing but not inner language. Therefore, they can communicate by reading and writing. Moreover, impairment in hearing is not always severe and is often transient. However, despite long-term (more than 15 years) energetic education and almost normal intellectual ability (Performance IQ of Wechsler intelligence Scale for Children-Revised was 91), our patient's language ability was extremely poor. Cerebral plasticity could not work fully on our patient, whose bilateral temporal lobe was severely injured in early childhood. The establishment of a systematic training method in such patients is an urgent objective in this field.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. Otological manifestations of churg-strauss syndrome.

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To describe the clinical features, pathogenesis, and management of the otological complications in churg-strauss syndrome (CSS). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of five patients with documented CSS who had otological manifestations in the later stages of CSS. methods: The history, treatment, and outcome were evaluated using office and hospital chart data in these five cases. RESULTS: In all cases, otological manifestations occurred during an advanced stage of CSS and was characterized by the presence of dense aural discharge, granulomatous eosinophilic infiltration into mastoid and middle ear, and subacute severe to profound hearing loss. In all cases, the recurrent aural discharge and granulomatous infiltrate was unresponsive to conventional treatment including repeated myringotomies and aggressive antibiotics. Systemic steroid administration resulted in a rapid, complete cessation of aural discharge and reversal or stabilization of hearing loss. Otological manifestations have been stable over a range of follow-up from 1 to 20 years on a maintenance regimen of steroids. CONCLUSIONS: temporal bone involvement in CSS is rare. Surgical intervention of the temporal bone is relegated to complications that may include infectious mastoiditis and intracranial involvement. Recognition of the association between CSS and otological disease is important because it is highly responsive to systemic steroids, and early steroid treatment may prevent progression to irreversible hearing loss, infectious otomastoiditis, or intracranial complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Long-term results and experience with the first-generation semi-implantable electromagnetic hearing aid with ossicular replacement device for mixed hearing loss.

    OBJECTIVE: To document the long-term surgical and audiologic results of the implantation of a first-generation semi-implantable hearing aid for mixed hearing loss, consisting of a magnetic partial or total ossicular replacement prosthesis and an electromagnetic driver fitted in the ear canal. The short-term results have previously been published as excellent in both surgical and audiologic terms. To analyze and discuss reasons of treatment failure, as well as future perspectives. STUDY DESIGN: Patient file review, follow-up otomicroscopic examination and audiometry, as well as patient interview. SETTING Tertiary referral center at a University hospital. patients: Of nine patients operated on, six with a mixed hearing loss after chronic otitis media could be evaluated primarily. Two underwent implantation with a partial and four with a total ossicular replacement prosthesis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Use of and satisfaction with the hearing aid, apparatus function and integrity, hearing without electromagnetic driver, prostheses containment, drum abnormalities, nonaudiologic ear symptoms, e.g., discharge. RESULTS: All patients attended follow-up for a mean of 9.5 years after implantation (range 8.8-10 years). No patients used the semi-implantable hearing aid at follow-up. The mean semi-implantable hearing aid using time was 24 months (range 3-60 months). The main reasons for discontinuation of use were problems fitting the electromagnetic driver correctly in the ear canal and prosthesis extrusion or dislocation. CONCLUSIONS: Despite excellent short-term surgical and audiologic results, it is concluded that these first long-term results of the first-generation electromagnetic semi-implantable hearing aids with ossicular replacement prosthesis for mixed hearing loss are disappointing. However, improvements in the surgical approach and in the reshaping, refinement, and overall improvement of the semi-implantable hearing aid could lead to satisfactory treatment of this group of patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Ear click in palatal tremor: its origin and treatment with botulinum toxin.

    We report the successful treatment of a rhythmic, continuing ear click in a patient with palatal tremor with local injections of botulinum toxin into the tensor veli palatini muscle. We could demonstrate that the ear click occurred during contraction of the tensor veli palatini, which opens the eustachian tube. Therefore, we believe that the clicking noise is due to the sudden breakdown of the surface tension within the eustachian tube. Our observations suggest that the ear click is due to rhythmic discharges of the trigeminal nucleus rather than the ambiguous nucleus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Pseudomonas labyrinthitis.

    pseudomonas aeruginosa is the gram-negative bacterial rod which is often isolated from chronic aural discharge. This microorganism may also cause necrotizing infection of the external auditory canal in certain patients with impaired host-defense mechanisms. Involvement of the inner ear by this microbe is extremely rare. In this communication, we report a case of pseudomonas labyrinthitis which resulted from traumatic middle ear injury. infection produced massive granulations and extensive bone destruction of the otic capsule. This case shows that while P.aeruginosa is usually an avirulent opportunistic pathogen, it may also cause a highly destructive labyrinthitis if the inner ear is entered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. Congenital cholesteatoma: review of twelve cases.

    This report reviews 12 cases of congenital cholesteatoma of the middle ear, mastoid, and petrous pyramid seen mostly in adult and older juvenile patients between 1984 and 1992. Featured herein are two unique instances of purulent discharge external to an intact tympanic membrane via a fistula caused by extensive mastoidal erosion, three cases that illustrate the importance in Oriental populations of the use of high resolution computed tomography to obviate misdiagnosis when all other diagnostic techniques suggest unilateral otosclerosis, and two instances of multicentric cholesteatomas in well-separated portions of the same temporal bone associated with ossicular anomalies of possible congenital origin. The predilective sites and extent of involvement in this series reinforces the pattern for this age group noted by others. That is, although most of the lesions were too diffusely invasive to define possible formative sites, those that were relatively small and discretely located were found at locations other than the anterior tympanum. This would suggest that their sites of origin and pathogeneses may be different from those commonly found in the anterosuperior tympanum of very young children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. Does type I afferent neuron dysfunction reveal itself through lack of efferent suppression?

    We present here two patients and three control subjects to demonstrate the clinical utility of studying evoked otoacoustic emissions and their contralateral suppression, as an aid to the delineation of afferent neuron dysfunction and possible lack of efferent suppression. The key patients here who fail to show contralateral suppression of their very robust otoacoustic emissions, concomitantly show paradoxically absent auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and absence of middle ear muscle reflexes despite normal audiograms in the 2 kHz region and normal tympanograms. One of these patients has nearly normal pure tone sensitivity up to 3 kHz. The other has normal sensitivity in the 2 kHz region, but poor sensitivity on either side of that frequency. In addition, the two patients of interest show absent masking level differences and inordinately poor speech discrimination. Three 'foils' are presented: one patient with poor hearing on either side of 2 kHz, one with Bell's Palsy, and the third with bilateral temporal lobe disease. These patients show respectively that (1) isolated normal hearing at 2 kHz, (2) absence of middle ear muscle reflexes and (3) conscious cortical awareness of sound do not contribute directly to this intriguing clinical state. We propose that these patients with absent ABRs suffer from an auditory nervous system dysfunction which disrupts access to the efferent system. This condition also disables whatever systems contribute to the neural synchrony inherent in recording compound far-field action potentials such as the ABR. There are a number of hypotheses to be considered here. One suggests that the key patients are deficient in synchronous activation of Type I afferent fibers to the degree that they cannot activate efferent feedback, or they may be able to use only so-called Type II afferent neurons to support their normal zones of pure tone sensitivity. A less likely consideration focuses on the notion that discharge of primary neurons might be in some way synchronized by an efferent system which in these patients is the primary source of deficit.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. neuroma of the facial nerve masked by chronic otitis media.

    The absence of facial twitching, weakness, or palsy makes the diagnosis of facial neuroma difficult. The authors report a case of neuroma of the horizontal portion of the facial nerve masked by the presence of a chronic ear. A woman with a long history of discharge and hypoacousia in her left ear presented with acute dizziness. Examination revealed grade 3 horizontal right nystagmus, left anacousia, and the appearance of an epitympanic cholesteatoma. Computed tomography (CT) was performed after the vestibular condition improved. The clinical diagnosis of chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma together with the radiologic finding of the mastoid and tympanic cavity completely occupied by soft tissue were enough to send the radiologist astray. The radiologic diagnosis confirmed that the bony destruction of the vestibule and lateral semicircular canal could be caused by a cholesteatoma. A neuroma of the horizontal portion of the facial nerve was discovered during surgery performed for the chronic ear. The postoperative study of the CT scans showed that there was no erosion of the malleus or incus, despite wide erosion of the vestibule and lateral semicircular canal. This finding would be enough to suggest the presence of pathology other than cholesteatoma. The patient refused exeresis of the neuroma. The authors recognize the difficulty in urging a patient to an operation that surely will result in worsening of the facial function. Follow-up in this case has revealed no change in tumor dimension or facial function over 3 years.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Vestibular abnormalities in charge association.

    We report the vestibular abnormalities in 5 patients with the CHARGE association (coloboma, heart disease, Atresia of choanae, Retarded growth and development and/or central nervous system anomalies, Genital hypoplasia, and Ear anomalies). All patients had absent vestibular function as indicated by absent vestibulo-ocular reflexes and severe imbalance on simultaneous deprivation of proprioception and vision, as well as delayed motor development. All 6 semicircular canals were aplastic in each of the patients. While cochlear function was severely reduced in 6 of the 10 ears, it was absent only in 3 ears and was actually intact below 3 kHz in 1 ear. All 10 bony cochleas were present on computed tomography, and although 7 appeared abnormal, 3 appeared normal. This study confirms that absence of the bony semicircular canals in the presence of a bony cochlea is a characteristic finding in CHARGE association. It also demonstrates that these disproportionate structural abnormalities are reflected in the functional abnormalities: absent vestibular function with preservation of some cochlear function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.0179398501251
keywords = charge, charge association
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Hearing Disorders'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.