Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/199. Successful cochlear implantation in a patient with melas syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe methods of assessing cochlear implant candidacy in patients with potentially significant peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) degeneration. STUDY DESIGN: A patient with a degenerative CNS disease (melas syndrome) undergoing evaluation for cochlear implantation is described. SETTING: This study took place at a tertiary care center. PATIENT: A patient with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) who had cortical blindness and profound sensorineural hearing loss was evaluated and rehabilitated with cochlear implantation. INTERVENTIONS: Pure-tone audiogram, behavioral responses to promontory stimulation electrical auditory brainstem response, and electrically evoked middle-latency responses (MLRs) were used to assess eighth nerve, auditory brainstem, and cortical auditory pathways. cochlear implantation with Cochlear Corporation mini 22 implant was performed. RESULTS: Repeatable electrically evoked MLRs and behavioral responses to promontory stimulation documented the presence of auditory cortical responses. Successful implantation resulted in open set speech recognition and communication using the auditory/oral mode. CONCLUSION: This report describes successful implantation in a patient with melas syndrome and demonstrates the ability to preoperatively confirm the integrity of brainstem and cortical auditory pathways despite significant CNS degeneration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/199. Case report and discussion of hearing preservation after translabyrinthine excision of small acoustic tumors.

    OBJECTIVE: Since 1991, three separate reports have shown how hearing may be salvaged after translabyrinthine excision of small acoustic tumors. The authors submit yet another report of a complete translabyrinthine excision of a 1.4-cm intracanalicular acoustic tumor with modest hearing preservation. An attempt is made to retrace the steps of the operation and recognize and discuss what particular events may have safeguarded the viability of the cochlea. With the availability of cochlear implantation, there should be added incentive to preserve the cochlear neurones if hair cells cannot be saved. STUDY DESIGN: The study design was a retrospective case review. SETTING: The study was conducted at a primary care hospital. INTERVENTION: Therapeutic and rehabilitative measures were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hearing preservation was measured. CASE REPORT: A 55-year-old woman presented with a left-sided hearing loss and a 1.4-cm left acoustic tumor completely filling the internal auditory canal (speech reception threshold [SRT] 30 dB, discrimination [Pb] 28%). A successful translabyrinthine excision of the tumor was performed in November 1995. A 1-year postoperative audiogram showed a mixed hearing loss in the left ear with SRT 85 dB and Pb 0%. Average pure-tone threshold for 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 3 kHz was 50 dB and aided SRT 40 dB with Pb 64%. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed complete excision of the tumor. CONCLUSION: An exceptional case of hearing preservation after translabyrinthine excision of a small acoustic tumor illustrates how it may be possible to preserve cochlear hair cells and neurones simultaneously in certain selected cases. A review of the surgical events shows the value of sealing the cochlear duct with bone wax, selectively removing the vestibular nerves with the tumor by sharp dissection, and safeguarding the meatal segment of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery by a limited dural incision.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/199. Bilateral facial nerve schwannomas.

    facial nerve schwannoma is an uncommon tumor and bilateral facial nerve tumors are extremely rare. A case is presented in which neuromas affecting the intra-canalicular and labyrinthine portions of both facial nerves occurred. Radiologic assessment demonstrated the origin of these tumors. Eventual tumor involvement of the sole functioning cochlea resulted in the development of total hearing loss. Management entailed symptomatic care and surgical resection. Auditory rehabilitation was attempted using cochlear implantation, but results have not been satisfactory. Genetic screening identified a mutation in the NF2 gene. It is proposed that this patient's condition should be considered a variant of neurofibromatosis 2 and that bilateral facial neuromas should be included in the clinical criteria for this condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/199. cochlear nerve aplasia: its importance in cochlear implantation.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to outline the possible implications and potentially valuable techniques for managing cases in which the neural integrity of the peripheral auditory system is in question. STUDY DESIGN: This study was a retrospective case review. SUBJECT AND METHOD: A 3-year-old child with a profound blilateral sensorineural hearing loss was assessed for suitability of cochlear implantation. Audiologic tests confirmed that the child met the audiologic criteria for cochlear implantation. Computed tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging were undertaken. RESULTS: Computed tomographic scanning showed bilateral narrow internal auditory canals. magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the acousticofacial bundle on the left side and possible atrophy of the bundle on the right. After detailed discussion, the parents elected to proceed with implantation on the right ear using the Nucleus mini-22 cochlear implant. Tuning of the device resulted in myogenic facial activity with no electrically stimulated auditory sensation. Postoperative electrophysiologic testing confirmed the presence of a compound muscle action potential only. CONCLUSIONS: Seven months after implantation, the child was explanted uneventfully. The electrical auditory nerve action potential and the electrically evoked auditory brainstem response, using intracochlear stimulation, are potentially valuable measurements to assess neural integrity before the decision to proceed with implantation is made.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/199. Solitary plasmacytoma of the skull base presenting with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Solitary plasmacytoma of the skull base is a rare entity with only a few reported cases in the literature. We review the literature and present our experience with this lesion that produced ipsilateral sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo and ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/199. Cutaneous-evoked tinnitus. I. Phenomenology, psychophysics and functional imaging.

    DC00166e and acute unilateral deafferentation of the auditory periphery (auditory and vestibular afferents) can induce changes in the central nervous system that may result in unique forms of tinnitus. These tinnitus perceptions can be controlled (turned on and off) or modulated (changed in pitch or loudness) by performing certain overt behaviors in other sensory/motor systems. Clinical reports from our laboratory and several other independent sources indicate that static change in eye gaze, from a neutral head-referenced position, is one such behavior that can evoke, modulate and/or suppress these phantom auditory events. This report deals with a new clinical entity and a form of tinnitus that can be evoked directly by cutaneous stimulation of the upper hand and fingertip regions. In 2 adults, cutaneous-evoked tinnitus was reported following neurosurgery for space-occupying lesions at the base of the skull and posterior craniofossa, where hearing and vestibular functions were lost completely and acutely in one ear (unilateral deafferentation) and facial nerve paralysis (unilateral deefferentation) was present either immediately following neurosurgery or had occurred as a delayed-onset event. Herein, we focus on the phenomenology of this discovery, provide perceptual correlates using contemporary psychophysical methods and document in one individual cutaneous-evoked tinnitus-related neural activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In a companion paper, neuroanatomical and physiological interactions between auditory and somatosensory systems, possible mechanistic accounts and relevant functional neuroimaging studies are reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/199. Salivary gland choristoma in the middle ear: a case report.

    Salivary gland choristoma (ectopic or heterotopic salivary gland tissue) is a rare condition that occurs in various locations within the head and neck regions. We present a 13-year-old boy with a salivary gland choristoma in the middle ear associated with congenital alopecia around the auricle in addition to facial nerve and ossicular chain abnormalities. Because the lesions commonly involve the facial nerve, intraoperative facial nerve monitoring is helpful in allowing safe biopsy without facial nerve damage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/199. Bilateral endolymphatic sac papillary carcinoma.

    We report a case of bilateral and almost symmetrical endolymphatic sac papillary adenocarcinoma. A 22-year-old male patient presented with bilateral sixth, seventh, eighth and lower cranial nerve paresis and ataxia. Radiological investigations revealed extensively vascular tumours in the region of both jugular bulbs. The literature on this rare entity is briefly discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/199. Hearing impairment in patients with acoustic neuroma--analysis by electrocochleography.

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with acoustic neuroma, the site and severity of hearing impairment are important in discussing surgical approaches. Since the effectiveness of conventional auditory psychological testing is limited, we studied objectively hearing impairment of the cochlea and the cochlear nerve due to the tumor. methods: Electrocochleography (ECochG) was carried out in 21 patients with acoustic neuroma. Cochlear microphonic potential (CM) and action potential (AP) in ECochG evoked with clicks and short tone bursts were recorded through a transtympanic needle electrode technique. Cochlear function was studied using the detection thresholds of CM, and cochlear nerve involvement was analyzed by differences between AP and CM detection thresholds. RESULTS: The 1 kHz CM detection threshold was elevated in 17 (81.0%) of 21 patients indicating cochlear impairment. Of seven patients with normal hearing or mild sensorineural hearing loss in pure tone audiometry, three had a slightly elevated CM detection threshold. Of five patients with pronounced pure tone levels, four showed a CM response and were thought to have mild cochlear dysfunction. cochlear nerve impairment was confirmed in three of four patients with well-developed CM based on elevated AP detection thresholds. Three patients had CM response but no AP response, suggesting severe cochlear nerve impairment. CONCLUSION: Disorders of the cochlea and the cochlear nerve can be evaluated with ECochG AP and CM measurement. The findings of ECochG are thought to be important information to judge hearing prognosis, thereby enhancing its clinical utility.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/199. Chemical labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation for Meniere's disease--an effective treatment or a last resort?

    The surgical management of Meniere's disease presents a difficult and controversial problem and includes various procedures ranging from 'placebo operations' to vestibular nerve section. The situation is even more complex in the case where the only hearing ear is affected. We present a case of severe debilitating vertigo due to Meniere's disease that was treated by chemical labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation. This unique management strategy allowed restoration of useful hearing and relief of vertigo.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hearing Loss, Sensorineural'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.