Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/117. Relationship between cystic change and rotatory vertigo in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    Acoustic neuromas are benign neoplasms that most often arise from the vestibular nerve. Many patients with this tumor experience some degree of vestibular symptoms. However, patients rarely complain of rotatory vertigo. Acoustic neuromas are known to exhibit a cystic appearance in some patients. It was hypothesized that cystic change might be a causative factor for rotatory vertigo. A retrospective study of 178 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma who underwent surgery in the Department of otolaryngology at tokyo Medical and Dental University was carried out. The cystic appearance of the tumors was detected preoperatively by magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. The relationship between cystic change of the tumor and presentation with rotatory vertigo was examined. Of the 178 patients studied, only 10 had both cystic change of the tumor and rotatory vertigo, and 120 had neither cystic tumor nor rotatory vertigo. Of the remaining 48 patients, 24 experienced rotatory vertigo with negative findings for cystic tumor and the other 24 had evidence of cystic tumor but no rotatory vertigo. Tumor with cystic change was observed in 34 patients, accounting for 19.1% of all patients studied. Rotatory vertigo was also experienced in 34 patients (19.1%). Of the 34 patients with cystic lesions, 29.4% (10) had rotatory vertigo. The difference in percentage of the two groups did not reach statistical significance. It is suggested that there may be other factors causing rotatory vertigo in patients with acoustic neuromas than cystic change of the tumor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/117. Frequency of cochlear enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for enhancement of inner ear structures of patients with sensorineural hearing loss and documented antibodies to the 68-kd inner ear antigen. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review with reexamination of MRI scans. SETTING: Outpatient office. patients: Thirty-five patients with autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss defined by audiograms documenting a sensorineural hearing deficit in one or both ears and the presence of an anti-inner ear antibody (68-kd band) in serum samples who underwent precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted axial and coronal MRI scans of the inner ear, which were performed concurrently with the hearing loss. INTERVENTIONS: Diagnostic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency and intensity of cochlear enhancement on MRI scans. RESULTS: One patient demonstrated 2 cochlear enhancement. However, that finding was thought to represent postoperative inflammatory change. CONCLUSION: No correlation was found between the presence of antibodies to inner ear antigen in patients with hearing loss and cochlear enhancement on MRI scans.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/117. Syndrome of recurrent meninigitis due to congenital perilymph fistula with two different clinical presentations.

    Recurrent meningitis secondary to a congenital labyrinthine anomaly is a rare clinical entity, diagnosis of which is dependent upon certain clinical, radiological and intraoperative features. In the following report we describe two children with congenital labyrinthine fistula and recurrent meningitis whose clinical presentation, radiological features and intraoperative findings were dissimilar and thus, illustrative of two different ways of presentation of this rare disorder. While one had a classical Mondini defect and unilateral hearing loss, the other had normal audiometric and radiographic findings. The fistulae were successfully closed via a tympanotomy approach in both the patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/117. Osteomas of the internal auditory canal: a report of two cases.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the optimal medical or surgical treatment of osteomas of the internal auditory canal (IAC) as well as their growth characteristics. STUDY DESIGN: Information was obtained from case histories, images from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, surgical and pathologic findings, and long-term clinical results. methods: Two patients, along with 10 additional patients reported in the literature, with osteomas of the IAC with varying symptoms were studied. Clinical history, audiometric and vestibular test results, and radiographic studies were reviewed on all patients. Histopathologic examination of the surgical specimens confirmed the presence of osteomas. The clinical outcomes were studied to determine if the preoperative symptoms had resolved. RESULTS: Eight of 12 patients underwent surgical removal of their IAC osteomas. Three of eight patients had total resolution of all symptoms. Three patients had improvement of their sensorineural hearing loss. Five patients had resolution of their dizziness. Four patients noted resolution of their tinnitus. In the absence of auditory symptoms, vestibular symptoms may be controlled with medical therapy. Long term follow-up of the two patients discussed showed little or no growth over a 4- to 5-year period. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical intervention may be warranted to remove an osteoma of the IAC if symptoms are present. patients should be made aware that symptoms may or may not improve. Continuation of symptoms may be a result of chronic compression of the auditory and vestibular nerves.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/117. Prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage and delayed loss of preserved hearing after vestibular schwannoma removal: reconstruction of the internal auditory canal in the suboccipital transmeatal approach--technical note.

    The suboccipital transmeatal approach uses packing of a muscle or fat graft into the internal auditory canal (IAC) to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, preserved hearing after removal of vestibular schwannomas may decline over time because of the progressive constriction of cochlear vascular supply due to scarring of the IAC. We propose a surgical technique for IAC reconstruction, which separates the preserved cochlear nerve and vasculature from the graft, and regains the CSF space in the IAC. Prior to the drilling of the posterior wall of the IAC, the dura mater of the petrous bone forming the posterior wall of the IAC is harvested for IAC reconstruction. After completion of tumor removal, a "roof" of the IAC is reconstructed using the dura mater, and a muscle or fat graft soaked with fibrin glue is placed on the "roof" of the IAC. The IAC was reconstructed using this technique in 26 consecutive patients with vestibular schwannomas who underwent tumor removal via the suboccipital transmeatal approach. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the regained CSF space in the IAC. No delayed hearing loss occurred in four patients with preserved hearing. No CSF leakage occurred after surgery. This new technique of IAC reconstruction may prevent delayed hearing loss as well as postoperative CSF leakage after removal of vestibular schwannomas via the suboccipital transmeatal approach.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/117. Word deafness after resection of a pineal body tumor in the presence of normal wave latencies of the auditory brain stem response.

    We studied the case of a 48-year-old woman who had resection of a pineal body tumor in terms of postoperative audiological function. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging disclosed partial inferior colliculi destruction and medial geniculate body degeneration. A pure tone audiogram revealed only moderate sensorineural hearing loss, but her speech perception was totally impaired. The binaural sound localization function was also impaired. The auditory brain stem response (ABR) showed waves I, III, and V to have normal latencies. The amplitude of wave III was larger than that of wave V. These results support the view that the waves of the ABR are elicited from multiple sources in the auditory brain stem nuclei and tracts. This case suggests a substantial role for the inferior colliculus and medial geniculate body in the processing of speech perception and sound localization.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/117. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss after spinal surgery under general anesthesia.

    Two patients, ages 72 and 71, who underwent lumbar decompressive surgery for spinal stenosis, were evaluated for postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). After two uncomplicated spinal procedures, both patients developed SSHL immediately after surgery. hearing loss was moderate to profound in these two patients. None of the patients had a significant otologic history. nitrous oxide administration, Valsalva maneuvers during general anesthesia, and transient drops in cerebrospinal fluid pressure stemming from spinal decompression may, in some combination, lead to an implosive force on the inner ear, causing SSHL. Further causes of postlumbar surgery SSHL may include microemboli or viral infections. SSHL is a rare but possible complication after nonotologic, noncardiac bypass surgery; only 26 cases of SSHL after this surgery have been reported. We encourage the continued reporting of sudden sensorineural hearing loss after spinal surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/117. Conservative management of infections in cochlear implant recipients.

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate a conservative management strategy of postoperative infection after cochlear implantation. methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of 108 cochlear implant patients operated on at the University of california, san francisco between 1991 and 2000 and 133 cochlear implant patients from the University of iowa between 1997 and 2000 showed 4 patients with evidence of postoperative infections. The clinical presentation, intervention, laboratory results, and outcome are analyzed in each case. RESULTS: Minimal surgical intervention with limited incision and drainage with prolonged postoperative antibiotics was effective in treating postoperative cochlear implant infections without the need for device removal. Implant function remained unaffected after surgery. CONCLUSION: Postoperative cochlear implant infections can be effectively controlled with limited surgical and prolonged medical management. Chronic implant infections may be explained by a primary immunodeficiency. With appropriate treatment leading to infection control, a conservative management strategy is advocated before consideration of device explantation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/117. Surgical evaluation of candidates for cochlear implants.

    The customary presentation of surgical procedures to patients in the united states consists of discussions on alternative treatment methods, risks of the procedure(s) under consideration, and potential benefits for the patient. Because the contents of the normal speech signal have not been defined in a way that permits a surgeon systematically to provide alternative auditory signals to a deaf patient, the burden is placed on the surgeon to make an arbitrary selection of candidates and available devices for cochlear prosthetic implantation. In an attempt to obtain some information regarding the ability of a deaf patient to use electrical signals to detect and understand speech, the Good Samaritan Hospital and Neurological Sciences Institute cochlear implant team has routinely performed tympanotomies using local anesthesia and has positioned temporary electrodes onto the round windows of implant candidates. The purpose of this paper is to review our experience with this procedure and to provide some observations that may be useful in a comprehensive preoperative evaluation for totally deaf patients who are being considered for cochlear implantation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/117. kidney transplantation unraveling wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: In wolfram syndrome insulin-dependent diabetes is associated with a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder. There are no prior reports of kidney transplantation in patients with wolfram syndrome. methods: kidney transplantation was undertaken in a child with dysplastic kidneys, sensorineural hearing impairment and bilateral optic atrophy-a combination of features insufficient to define wolfram syndrome. RESULTS: After the procedure diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus and urinary bladder dysfunction emerged, thereby revealing wolfram syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: We discuss the etiology of our patient's postoperative events, and conclude that kidney transplantation may expose dormant manifestations-or aggravate existing manifestations-of wolfram syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hearing Loss, Sensorineural'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.