Cases reported "Hearing Loss"

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1/28. Influence of otitis media on hearing and development.

    otitis media affects nearly every child at some time; many children have mild-to-moderate hearing losses for prolonged periods. The effects of these losses on language and educational development may be significant; possible mechanisms are discussed. Especially in suboptimal listening situations, speech perception may be impaired by even a mild hearing loss. Patterns of imperception are predicted by comparison of composite audiometric data from children with middle ear effusions with speech power data, and by analysis of sound pressure waveforms of speech filtered to simulate the typical hearing loss of these patients. A new method of analysis of brain stem evoked responses, yielding response components attributable to binaural interaction, is reported. This and other evoked response techniques may be able to identify objective changes in auditory nervous system function attributable to relative sensory deprivation during development. Finally, directions for further research in this area are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wave
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2/28. A new method of partial deafness treatment.

    BACKGROUND: There is a significant group of patients whose hearing impairment is characterized by normal or slightly elevated thresholds in the low frequency band with nearly total deafness in high frequency range. These patients remain beyond the scope of effective treatment by hearing aids. We name this kind of hearing loss 'partial deafness'. CASE REPORT: A new method of partial deafness treatment was applied in the case of a young woman. A partially-inserted cochlear implant was used to restore hearing at high frequencies, while preserving low-frequency acoustic hearing in the implanted ear. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a substantial improvement in speech discrimination and communication skills when electric stimulation on one side was combined with acoustic stimulation on both sides.
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ranking = 71.546658919851
keywords = high frequency, frequency
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3/28. A case of hearing loss and quadriplegia after a pontine hemorrhage.

    We herein describe the case of a 50-year-old female who developed a pontine hemorrhage with consciousness disturbance and quadriplegia. Her respiratory condition was so bad that she needed to be intubated and put on artificial respiration. After her consciousness and respiratory condition gradually recovered, we noticed that she had developed a bilateral hearing loss. The auditory brain stem response test revealed only I waves on both sides, thus suggesting that her hearing loss had been caused by an injury to the hearing-conducting pathway including the cochlear nuclei. In this case, the hematoma extended from the lower to the upper part of pons and, furthermore, it was also located broadly in the dorsal part of the pons. As a result, the cochlear nuclei and corpus trapezoideum appeared to have been destroyed by the hematoma. However, since most cases with a brain stem hemorrhage showing bilateral hearing loss tend to be in a severe condition, this condition is often easy to overlook. We should therefore carefully evaluate patients' reaction to hearing stimulation to avoid overlooking any hearing loss in such patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wave
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4/28. When hearing aids go bad: an FM success story.

    Both clinical and research findings support the effectiveness of frequency-modulated (FM) technology among individuals who continue to encounter significant communication problems despite the use of conventional hearing instruments. The use rate of FM devices throughout the nation, however, remains disappointingly low. The authors present a case of a longtime hearing aid user whose hearing aids provided decreasing benefit as his hearing impairment increased to the extent that cochlear implantation was considered. Through the establishment of patient-specific treatment goals, the provision of appropriate FM technology as verified through real-ear measurements, and careful and deliberate counseling and follow-up, this patient was able to realize significant communication benefits as reported through several self-assessment measures. The cost-benefit implications of FM technology versus cochlear implantation are discussed.
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ranking = 0.69524505170928
keywords = frequency
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5/28. Rare cases of Meniere's disease in children.

    Classical Meniere's disease is rarely found in children and literature regarding it is scarce. In general, the frequency of Meniere's disease in children is only 0.4-7.0 per cent of that in adults. The progression pattern of Meniere's disease in children is not known well. Here, we report three cases of Meniere's disease in children less than 15 years old, treated over nine years. The three cases comprise 14- and 13-year-old boys and a nine-year-old girl. Two of the three patients initially complained only of recurrent bouts of vertigo, without any tinnitus, ear fullness or hearing impairment. In all three cases, the early pure tone audiograms showed only high tone frequency loss, regardless of subjective hearing loss, and the decrease in the hearing threshold was observed one to eight years after the dizziness attacks began. The hearing threshold was usually decreased to a level of mild or moderate hearing impairment. After diuretic treatment, vertigo was generally well controlled, and some cases showed improvement in hearing. Of the total number of patients with Meniere's disease who visited our department over nine years, 2.6 per cent (3/114) were children, and the overall incidence of Meniere's disease in children with vertigo was 2.0 per cent (3/147). In conclusion, Meniere's disease in children rarely develops and may have characteristics of high tone loss in initial audiograms.
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ranking = 1.3904901034186
keywords = frequency
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6/28. Otologic findings of DIDMOAD syndrome.

    Two brothers with DIDMOAD (Wolfram) syndrome are described. The elder brother is 12 years old and was diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus at five. He later developed optic atrophy. The younger brother is 10 years old. He also has suffered from diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Their audiograms showed moderate hearing loss only at 8000 Hz. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was normal. No vestibular abnormalities were found. In 151 reported cases, including present cases, 17.4 percent have moderate to severe or at least subjective deafness, 45.0 percent have deafness only at high frequency, 6 percent have deafness for which the severity was not described, 13.4 percent have normal hearing, and in 18.1 percent the status of hearing was not mentioned.
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ranking = 70.156168816432
keywords = high frequency, frequency
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7/28. Absence of both auditory evoked potentials and auditory percepts dependent on timing cues.

    An 11-yr-old girl had an absence of sensory components of auditory evoked potentials (brainstem, middle and long-latency) to click and tone burst stimuli that she could clearly hear. Psychoacoustic tests revealed a marked impairment of those auditory perceptions dependent on temporal cues, that is, lateralization of binaural clicks, change of binaural masked threshold with changes in signal phase, binaural beats, detection of paired monaural clicks, monaural detection of a silent gap in a sound, and monaural threshold elevation for short duration tones. In contrast, auditory functions reflecting intensity or frequency discriminations (difference limens) were only minimally impaired. Pure tone audiometry showed a moderate (50 dB) bilateral hearing loss with a disproportionate severe loss of word intelligibility. Those auditory evoked potentials that were preserved included (1) cochlear microphonics reflecting hair cell activity; (2) cortical sustained potentials reflecting processing of slowly changing signals; and (3) long-latency cognitive components (P300, processing negativity) reflecting endogenous auditory cognitive processes. Both the evoked potential and perceptual deficits are attributed to changes in temporal encoding of acoustic signals perhaps occurring at the synapse between hair cell and eighth nerve dendrites. The results from this patient are discussed in relation to previously published cases with absent auditory evoked potentials and preserved hearing.
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ranking = 0.69524505170928
keywords = frequency
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8/28. Usefulness of 1000 Hz tone-burst-evoked responses in the diagnosis of acoustic neuroma.

    The auditory brain stem response (ABR) has become widely recognized as a sensitive and cost-effective screening modality in neuro-otologic diagnosis. However, the audiometric characteristics of the test ear may obscure the interpretation of the click-evoked ABR, particularly in the face of high-frequency hearing loss. It is often unclear whether latency delays or absent responses are attributable to retrocochlear disease or simply to the magnitude of the patient's hearing loss. The acoustic click stimulus commonly used in ABR testing activates predominantly the basilar membrane in the 2000 to 4000 Hz range. Because many cochlear and retrocochlear processes are associated mainly with hearing loss in this range, we have found it helpful in selected cases to use 1000 Hz tone-burst stimuli to circumvent the effects of elevated hearing thresholds on the ABR. In this article, our experience with the use of 1000 Hz nonlinearly gated tonebursts in 17 patients with acoustic neuroma is presented.
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ranking = 0.69524505170928
keywords = frequency
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9/28. Use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist analogue for treatment of cyclic auditory dysfunction.

    A patient with cyclic luteal phase high-frequency hearing loss is described. This was documented by pre- and post-menstrual audiograms indicating a 40-dB hearing loss in the luteal phase. This had been long-standing and was resistant to oral contraceptive therapy. A gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (nafarelin) was used to inhibit ovarian function and was successful in preventing loss of hearing for the 6-month treatment period.
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ranking = 0.69524505170928
keywords = frequency
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10/28. Eighth nerve signs in a case of multiple sclerosis.

    We evaluated a 25-year-old woman with multiple sclerosis who presented with the acute onset of a profound unilateral high-frequency, sensorineural hearing loss that resolved clinically within 10 days. Click-elicited brain stem-evoked responses were abnormal at the time of presentation and demonstrated only limited recovery over a follow-up period of 11 months. magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a lesion in the eighth nerve root-entry zone and the cochlear nucleus. Our findings in this case support the hypothesis of eighth nerve root-entry zone involvement in sudden hearing loss in multiple sclerosis and reinforce the notion that click-elicited brain stem-evoked responses are useful primarily to evaluate the high-frequency regions of the auditory system.
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ranking = 1.3904901034186
keywords = frequency
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