Cases reported "Hearing Loss"

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1/5. Jugulotympanic paraganglioma (glomus tumour) presenting with recurrent epistaxis.

    A case is presented where a left jugulotympanic paraganglioma (JTP) extended to the nasopharynx and the patient presented with recurrent epistaxis. Although initial biopsy of an aural polyp had been suggestive of the diagnosis several years previously, the diagnosis was not confirmed until the patient presented with recurrent epistaxis and severe anaemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported of such a presentation of JTP.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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2/5. Impedance audiometry: its use in the diagnosis of glomus tympanicum tumors.

    Three cases of glomus tympanicum are presented. The audiological findings are discussed with special emphasis on the results of impedance audiometry. The use of impedance audiometry in the diagnosis and follow-up of glomus tympanicum tumors is suggested.
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ranking = 133.00745557236
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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3/5. Glomus vagale tumor: the significance of early vocal cord paralysis.

    Glomus body tumors most frequently originate in the middle ear (tympanicum) or on the jugular bulb (jugulare). Tumors that arise from the vagal body account for less than 2.5% of these unique paraganglionic neoplasms. Otologic manifestations of tympanicum and jugulare tumors usually precede or accompany neurologic findings. In reviewing five cases of glomus vagale tumors, the initial symptom of voice change, caused by vocal cord paralysis, preceded the presenting symptoms of hearing loss and tinnitus by an average of 2.5 years. The concept of early cranial nerve involvement by glomus vagale tumors is supported in a literature review. The evaluation of "idiopathic" vocal cord paralysis must include radiographic inspection of the skull base, whereas an accurate, temporal account of presenting symptoms may help distinguish vagal body tumors from other vascular neoplasms of this region.
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ranking = 44.335818524119
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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4/5. Hypercoagulability in otologic patients.

    INTRODUCTION: Three patients with otologic disorders developed complications related to hypercoagulability. This report was prepared to increase the awareness among otolaryngologists of the diagnosis and management of hypercoagulable states, and to encourage expert consultation when indicated. MATERIALS AND methods: One patient with dural venous sinus thrombosis complicating an otitis media, one patient with a large glomus jugulare tumor, and one patient with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss were treated by the otolaryngology service. Suspicious thromboembolic events were evaluated by the hematology service, and appropriate anticoagulative therapy was recommended. RESULTS: One patient with an inherited hypercoagulopathy and two patients with acquired hypercoagulopathies were treated for otologic problems. Two of the patients were stabilized and discharged on life-long anticoagulation therapy. The third patient, in spite of intensive medical and surgical support, eventually succumbed to complications to which an acquired hypercoagulable state made a significant contribution. Expert consultants made the hematologic diagnoses and treatment recommendations. CONCLUSION: Otolaryngologists should be aware that hypercoagulable states may now be more accurately diagnosed and characterized, and that thorough investigation of thromboembolic events may affect treatment decisions.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = glomus
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5/5. Oligosymptomatic glomus tympanicum and caroticium with two different histological pictures.

    Though glomus tumors have been relatively frequently reported, there is very little material about their differential diagnostic problems. The authors present a case of glomus tympanicum and glomus caroticum with only otological symptoms, facial paralysis and traumatic arterio-venous shunts in the neck. These two tumors had few different patterns of glomus tissue.
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ranking = 111.5895463103
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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