Cases reported "Heart Arrest"

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1/122. Ventricular asystole during vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy in humans.

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, a recently available option for patients with refractory epilepsy, has demonstrated safety and efficacy. We report four patients with refractory epilepsy who experienced ventricular asystole intraoperatively during initial testing for implantation of the vagus nerve stimulator. Acute intraoperative vagus nerve stimulation may create ventricular asystole in humans. Extracorporeal cervical vagus nerve stimulation testing with continuous EKG monitoring intraoperatively before generator implantation is warranted.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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2/122. ephedrine-induced complete atrioventricular block with ventricular asystole during rapid concomitant phenytoin infusion: a case report.

    ephedrine is widely used to elevate blood pressure, however, one should be cautious to use it concomitantly with phenytoin infusion in neurosurgical procedures. A 59-year-old female was admitted for craniotomy with removal of metastatic brain tumor. During operation phenytoin infusion was given to forestall postoperative seizure. hypotension, bradycardia and complete atrioventricular block followed by ventricular asystole suddenly occurred when the patient was given ephedrine to elevate the blood pressure to see the hemostatic effect close to the end of operation. We discontinued the phenytoin infusion and immediately injected 1.5 mg epinephrine. She was successfully resuscitated. We conclude that when phenytoin is used intraoperatively it should be administered by an infusion pump at a rate of less than 25 mg/min and under continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm, heart rate, and blood pressure. When pressure support is required, the use of a pure alpha-agonist may minimize the risk of adverse reactions in the presence of phenytoin infusion.
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ranking = 18.492535194126
keywords = block
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3/122. Lyme carditis: complete AV dissociation with episodic asystole presenting as syncope in the emergency department.

    We report a case of Lyme carditis in an otherwise-healthy young male who presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with syncope and a possible seizure. This patient, without documented history of lyme disease, acutely developed third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block with episodic asystole, which required placement of a transvenous pacemaker in the ED and resolved only after the patient had been placed on ceftriaxone. We discuss the significance of Lyme carditis and its increasing prevalence, and review the current literature. We also recommend appropriate screening modalities for patients with known lyme disease, or an atypical profile for cardiac abnormalities.
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ranking = 3.6985070388251
keywords = block
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4/122. Congenital long-QT syndrome: a case report illustrating diagnostic pitfalls.

    This article reviews the clinical course of a 10-year-old child with a lifelong history of seizures and congenital deafness who presented after an episode of sudden cardiac arrest secondary to long-QT syndrome-induced torsade de pointes. Jervell-Lange-Nielsen syndrome is a rare cardioauditory syndrome in which affected subjects are susceptible to recurrent syncope and sudden death from ventricular dysrhythmias, usually before the second decade of life. Careful evaluation of suspected subjects is important because of the variability of the QTc interval. Recent research has identified specific gene sequences that encode ion channels responsible for both prolonged QTc interval and deafness. Treatment of symptomatic cardiac disease with beta-blockers in combination with pacemakers and automated internal cardioverter defibrillators can markedly improve quality of life and suppress ventricular dysrhythmias even in the most severely affected subjects. The recent identification of gene sequences identifying some congenital long-QT syndromes may improve screening methods for affected patients and lead to potential therapeutic intervention.
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ranking = 3.6985070388251
keywords = block
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5/122. bradycardia and asystole with the use of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of epilepsy: a rare complication of intraoperative device testing.

    PURPOSES: A 56-year-old man with mild mental retardation, right congenital hemiparesis, and refractory partial seizures was referred for vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). methods: Routine lead diagnostic testing during the surgical procedure (1.0 mA, 20 Hz, and 500 micros, for approximately 17 s) resulted, during the initial two stimulations, in a bradycardia of approximately 30 beats/min. A third attempt led to transient asystole that required atropine and brief cardiopulmonary resuscitation. RESULTS: The procedure was immediately terminated, the device removed, and the patient recovered completely. A postoperative cardiologic evaluation, including an ECG, 24-h Holter monitor, echocardiogram, and a tilt-table test, was normal. CONCLUSIONS: Possible mechanisms for the bradycardia/asystole include stimulation of cervical cardiac branches of the vagus nerve either by collateral current spread or directly by inadvertent placement of the electrodes on one of these branches; improper plugging of the electrodes into the pulse generator, resulting in erratic varying intensity of stimulation; reverse polarity; and idiosyncratic-type reaction in a hypersusceptible individual. The manufacturer reports the occurrence rate in approximately 3,500 implants for this intraoperative event to be approximately one in 875 cases or 0.1%.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = nerve
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6/122. Advanced heart block as a manifestation of a paraneoplastic syndrome from malignant thymoma.

    Malignant thymoma is a rare tumor that is associated with paraneoplastic syndrome. myocarditis as a paraneoplastic syndrome has been rarely described. Reported herein is a young male patient with malignant thymoma and myocarditis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome. This resulted in high-degree heart block and an asystolic cardiac arrest despite placement of a permanent pacemaker.
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ranking = 18.492535194126
keywords = block
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7/122. Frightening dreams and spells: a case of ventricular asystole from lyme disease.

    We present a case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with a febrile illness, frightening dreams and repeated short episodes of apparent seizure activity. Third degree heart block and ventricular asystole were noted on the monitor when the patient experienced a spell during conscious sedation for a lumbar puncture. The combination of heart block and a predominantly lymphocytic cerebrospinal fluid led to the diagnosis of lyme disease. Lyme titres were strongly positive and subsequently confirmed by Western Blot analysis. Cardiac aetiologies and specifically heart block associated with lyme disease should be considered in patients from endemic areas presenting with fever and unexplained spells or seizure-like activity.
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ranking = 11.095521116475
keywords = block
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8/122. bradycardia and asystolic cardiac arrest during spinal anaesthesia: a report of five cases.

    Sudden, severe bradycardia/asystolic cardiac arrest are considered infrequent, but are certainly the most serious complications of spinal anaesthesia. We report four cases of primary asystole and one of severe bradycardia in young to middle-aged, healthy patients scheduled for minor surgery at the day surgery unit. bradycardia/asystole were not related to respiratory depression or hypoxaemia/hypercarbia; they occurred at different time intervals after the onset of spinal anaesthesia (10-70 min) and, apparently, were not dependent on the level of sensory block, which varied between T3 and T8. One patient was nauseated seconds before the asystole, otherwise there was no warning signs. All the patients were easily resuscitated with the prompt administration of atropine and ephedrine and, in the case of cardiac arrest, cardiac massage and ventilation with oxygen. One patient was treated with a small dose of adrenaline. Four patients had the surgery, as planned; one had the surgery postponed. All the patients were discharged from hospital in good health and did not suffer any sequelae.
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ranking = 3.6985070388251
keywords = block
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9/122. Unique interaction between an atrial single-chamber pacemaker and a ventricular defibrillator.

    A well described interaction between an antibradycardia pacemaker and a ventricular defibrillator is sensing of pacemaker stimuli by the ventricular defibrillator. This report describes an interaction between an atrial demand pacemaker and a ventricular defibrillator that resulted in ventricular asystole and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. In this case, the ventricular defibrillator sensed atrial pacing stimuli when complete atrioventricular block with a slow ventricular escape rate developed. Defibrillator-based ventricular demand pacing was inhibited, resulting in prolonged periods of ventricular asystole, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and multiple defibrillator shocks. Ventricular defibrillator sensing of atrial pacemaker stimuli in the setting of complete atrioventricular block and ventricular asystole cannot be simulated during defibrillator implantation when atrioventricular conduction is intact. Therefore, a pacemaker programmed to atrial demand pacing in a patient with a ventricular defibrillator can result in inappropriate inhibition of ventricular pacing in the setting of complete heart block. Furthermore, this interaction can be avoided with a dual-chamber pacing ventricular defibrillator.
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ranking = 11.095521116475
keywords = block
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10/122. Lumbar epidural blocks: a case report of a life-threatening complication.

    A case of life-threatening complication resulting from a lumbar epidural block is presented. A 70-year-old woman with spinal stenosis developed cardiac and respiratory arrest 5 minutes after receiving a lumbar epidural block containing 80 mg of triamcinolone acetonide and 6mL of 1.5% lidocaine. The patient received cardiopulmonary resuscitation and recovered without any sequelae. It is suggested that this complication was caused by subdural or intravascular injection of local anesthetics. It might be preventable by injecting a test dose of local anesthetics before injecting a full dose of local anesthetics and by using fluoroscopy.
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ranking = 22.191042232951
keywords = block
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