Cases reported "Heart Arrest"

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1/23. theophylline therapy for near-fatal cheyne-stokes respiration. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: cheyne-stokes respiration is characterized by periodic breathing that alternates with hypopnea or apnea. OBJECTIVE: To describe the effect of theophylline on near-fatal cheyne-stokes respiration. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENT: A 48-year-old diabetic woman with a history of three cardiorespiratory arrests, a normal coronary arteriogram, normal left ventricular function, and severe cheyne-stokes respiration. MEASUREMENTS: oxygen saturation, intra-arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, chest wall movement, electrocardiography, electromyography, electroencephalography, electro-oculography, minute ventilation, arterial blood gases, and serum theophylline levels. RESULTS: After intravenous administration of 1.2 mg of theophylline at 0.6 mg/kg per hour (serum level, 5.6 microg/mL), both cheyne-stokes respiration and oxygen desaturation were markedly attenuated. After infusion of 2.4 mg of theophylline (serum level, 11.6 microg/mL), cheyne-stokes respiration resolved completely. No change was seen with placebo. cheyne-stokes respiration did not recur during outpatient treatment with oral theophylline. CONCLUSION: theophylline may be a rapid and effective therapy for life-threatening cheyne-stokes respiration.
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keywords = respiration, breathing
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2/23. Tracheobronchial involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    Relapsing polychondritis (RPC) is a multisystem disorder of chondromalacia involving any cartilage. Respiratory tract involvement is the greatest threat to life. We report a patient with stenosis of the subglottic trachea and left main bronchus who suddenly ceased breathing. As this patient did not have any other clinical features of RPC, the diagnosis was difficult. CT showed circumferential worm-eaten-like thickening suggesting a deformity and edema of the tracheal mucosa. biopsy of the tracheal and thyroid cartilage revealed mild cartilage degeneration and infiltration with inflammatory cells. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having RPC. She is currently well 24 months after Montgomery T tube intubation with systemic steroids. Narrowing of the left main bronchus has not worsened.
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ranking = 0.0059799591687114
keywords = breathing
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3/23. An exceptional case of complete neurologic recovery after more than 5-h cardiac arrest.

    We describe a case of more than 5 h cardiac arrest in a 60-year-old patient who underwent general anesthesia for a urologic operation. Before extubation, the patient suddenly developed ventricular fibrillation, pulseless ventricular tachycardia and asystole which was immediately treated by advanced life support (ALS) measures. Thirty minutes later seizures developed and were controlled by 200 mg of thiopentone and 10 mg of diazepam. A pattern of ventricular tachycardia, coarse ventricular fibrillation and asystole lasted for nearly 120 min. Termination of resuscitation maneuvers was considered, but long-term life support was continued for 5 h. After this time, peripheral pulses, with a supraventricular tachycardia-like rhythm and regular spontaneous breathing reappeared. Seven hours later, the patient had a glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 5, dilated unresponsive, absence of pupils, and a systolic arterial pressure of 100 mmHg. He was then transferred to intensive care unit (ICU). The morning after, the patient was awake, responded to simple orders, breathing spontaneously, and free from sensomotor deficit. He was, therefore, extubated. Subsequently, other episodes of transitory ST-line upper wave followed by ventricular fibrillation appeared, suggesting Prinzmetal angina. This was successfully treated by percutaneous coronary angioplasty. The first electroencephalogram recorded the day after cardiac arrest showed a mild widespread background slowing. An electroencephalogram 6 days later showed a return to alpha rhythm with only mild theta-wave abnormalities. Four weeks after the first cardiac arrest the patient was discharged. This is an exceptional experience compared with the others reported. We believe that all the efforts must not be given up when such an event occurs during anesthesia and there are optimal conditions for resuscitation maneuvers.
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ranking = 0.011959918337423
keywords = breathing
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4/23. Lychee-flavored gel candies: a potentially lethal snack for infants and children.

    A 10 month-old infant was given a Lychee Mini Fruity Gel (AP frozen foods Ltd, thailand) by his mother while shopping in a supermarket. The child was sucking on the gel when he began to choke and have difficulty breathing. emergency medical services were called, and paramedics found the child to be in respiratory arrest with a palpable pulse of 40 beats/min. They transported him to the pediatric emergency department, performing bag-valve-mask ventilation with a manual resuscitator. The child was intubated and taken to the operating room for bronchoscopy and then the pediatric intensive care unit for critical care. The initial report was that he choked on gelatin. However, he was found to have aspirated a large hard gel found in the lychee-flavored candy that totally obstructed his airway. This is the third case of aspiration of a gel candy we have seen in 5 years. parents should be warned not to give these candies to children younger than 5 years.
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keywords = breathing
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5/23. Circulatory arrest during PBPC apheresis in an unrelated donor.

    BACKGROUND: Nowadays, the collection of PBPCs by apheresis from healthy donors is a routine method. The mobilization with rHu G-CSF and the apheresis procedures are usually well tolerated without severe side effects. STUDY DESIGN AND methods: We report a severe complication in a 41-year-old unrelated female donor who was allowed to donate PBPCs and was mobilized with 10 microg of G-CSF per kg per day. During PBPC apheresis, she experienced a circulatory arrest after 132 minutes and processing of 7078 mL of blood (twice the donor's blood volume). RESULTS: Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored sinus rhythm and regulatory respiration without sequelae. Subsequent cardiologic examinations (heart catheterization, electrophysiologic testing, tilting table test) resulted in the diagnosis of a neurocardiogenic syncope. Other cardiac or circulatory disorders could be excluded. The implantation of a cardiac pacemaker was recommended to the donor. The 4-year-old recipient was successfully transplanted with the partial product collected until the arrest occurred. The patient received a total of 2.54 x 106 CD34 cells per kg of body weight. CONCLUSION: After exclusion of other cardiac diseases, the diagnosed neurocardiogenic syncope probably induced the circulatory arrest during apheresis rather than the administration of G-CSF.
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ranking = 0.09036545825739
keywords = respiration
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6/23. Successful CPCR in two patients.

    Authors have salvaged two cases suffering from respiratory and cardiac arrest with active effective cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR). One was a 53-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis whose tracheostomy tube was dislodged on the way to being transferred to the ICU. Another case, a 56-year-old farmer, the victim of an anesthesia accident which occurred in the cystoscopic examination room where equipment for CPR was unavailable. The patients were discharged with complete recovery of brain function after 64 days of unconsciousness in case 1 and weaning off after 74 days of mechanical ventilation in case 2. It is very important for the success of CPR to understand and practice the technique of CPR in the order: A (airway), B (breathing) and C (circulation). Early intubation and defibrillation is effective measurements for successful CPR. Training programs of CPR must be held not only for medical personnel but also for citizens in the developing counties.
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ranking = 0.0059799591687114
keywords = breathing
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7/23. Fatal angioedema associated with lisinopril.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of fatal angioedema associated with the use of lisinopril, a long-acting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. DATA SOURCES: case reports, review articles, short reports, and pertinent information from the patient's medical record. DATA EXTRACTION: Data was collected from contemporary medical journals and reviewed by both authors. DATA SYNTHESIS: angioedema associated with ACE inhibitors (captopril and enalapril) is well documented in the literature. With increased prescribing of newer, longer-acting agents, this potentially lethal adverse reaction is of even greater concern. Because angioedema associated with ACE inhibitors is a class-related event, the number of reported cases would be expected to increase with increasing numbers of prescriptions written for these drugs. This report, describing a patient who developed angioedema following therapy with lisinopril, illustrates the severity of this adverse reaction. PATIENT: A 66-year-old man presented to the emergency room complaining of increased swelling of the back of his throat and difficulty breathing. Despite treatment with epinephrine, antihistamines, and corticosteroids, the patient's condition progressed from that of severe laryngeal edema to total laryngospasm and complete airway obstruction. Emergency measures to intubate the patient were complicated by severe swelling of his neck and oropharynx, forcing the physician to perform a grossly traumatic tracheotomy. The difficulty encountered during intubation deprived the patient of oxygen for a significant amount of time, precipitating cardiopulmonary arrest. The anoxic episode resulted in hypoxic, ischemic encephalopathy and, ultimately, death. CONCLUSIONS: angioedema is a serious, potentially life-threatening adverse effect associated with the use of ACE inhibitors. Clinicians need to be aware of this effect when prescribing ACE inhibitors to treat hypertension and congestive heart failure, and when assessing patients presenting to the emergency room with complaints of tongue or pharyngeal swelling. patients should be instructed to report immediately to an emergency room for medical attention if they experience any unexplained shortness of breath or swelling of the throat or tongue.
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ranking = 0.0059799591687114
keywords = breathing
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8/23. A difficult intubation--fatal respiratory arrest secondary to an oral epulis.

    We report an unusual case of cardio-respiratory arrest and eventual death secondary to a benign tumour of the oral cavity obstructing the oropharynx. We review the literature of similar occurrences causing difficulty with respiration and intubation, and highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.
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ranking = 0.09036545825739
keywords = respiration
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9/23. Self-administered hyperventilation cardiopulmonary resuscitation for 100 s of cardiac arrest during Holter monitoring.

    An 80-year-old man remained conscious due to vigorous deep breathing during 100 s of ventricular arrest which was recorded on a Holter ECG. Arterial blood flow is considered to have been maintained by changes in intrathoracic pressure produced by deep respiratory movements. This case may represent a pure model of the "thoracic pump" mechanism.
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ranking = 0.0059799591687114
keywords = breathing
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10/23. Historical perspectives on anesthetic-related cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Contemporary interest in resuscitation was historically related to anesthetic death. Primitive techniques of anesthetic administration, loss of airway control, and psychologically influenced sudden death contributed to unanticipated respiratory and cardiac arrest. airway obstruction has remained the principal factor in asphyxial death, necessitating crucial preservation of respiratory function during induction of anesthesia. Early, disorganized overdose and arrest interventions included: application of cold water, manual artificial respiration, heat, friction and galvanic battery application. cardiopulmonary resuscitation, after years of research and experimentation became an integrated plan of attack: mouth-to-mouth ventilation and maneuvers eliminating pharyngeal obstruction were proven effective; internal and external cardiac massage was incorporated and definitive drug therapy began with epinephrine, strychnine, caffeine, carbon dioxide, amyl nitrate, coramine, metrazol and procaine. Defibrillation proved electricity converted ventricular fibrillation to normal sinus rhythm. Significant lethality still occurs from anesthetic-induced cardiac arrest, despite technological advances. Causes of operating room cardiac arrests are numerous and include sudden death syndrome. Constant vigilance distinguishes variable patient response. Immediate recognition and coordinated intervention assures success.
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ranking = 0.09036545825739
keywords = respiration
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