Cases reported "Heart Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/14. Pericardial abscess--a rare complication of sepsis.

    Pericardial abscess is a very rare complication of sepsis. Authors describe the case of a 69-year-old woman. In her case staphylococcus sepsis led to pericardial abscess. During the course positive blood cultures (3x) indicated the sepsis and pus was obtained from the left pleural cavity (pleuropneumonia). Concomitant purulent process in the left shoulder also was noted. Decline immunity due to long-standing corticoid therapy (prednisone) for proctocolitis idiopathica was observed. Following antibiotic treatment successful surgical evacuation of the pericardial abscess was performed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/14. leopard syndrome associated with hyperelastic skin: analysis of collagen metabolism in cultured skin fibroblasts.

    We present a patient with leopard syndrome and hyperelastic skin. Biochemical analysis using cultured skin fibroblasts showed normal type III and V collagen synthesis, lysyl hydroxylation level of type I procollagen and processing of pro-alpha(1) and alpha(2)(I). Our results suggest that molecular defects of hyperelasticity in leopard syndrome are not related to abnormal collagen metabolism, although not all steps of collagen synthesis have been investigated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/14. Listeria endocarditis causing aortic root abscess and a fistula to the left atrium.

    We report the case of a 74-year-old man who presented with endocarditis on a porcine aortic valve replacement. Five of six blood cultures grew listeria monocytogenes. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated the presence of a cavity posterior to the aortic annulus, apparently communicating with the left atrium. The patient underwent successful aortic valve re-replacement. Listeria endocarditis is rare with only 58 reported cases in the literature and is associated with high mortality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/14. Intracardiac mass complicating malassezia furfur fungemia.

    malassezia furfur is a lipophilic yeast known to colonize indwelling catheters. Although progression to vasculitis and sepsis has been described, it has rarely caused fungemia in adults receiving nutrition via an indwelling catheter. Difficulty in diagnosis occurs as M furfur does not grow on routine culture media unless it is supplemented with fatty acids. We present the first case of M furfur fungemia in an adult, complicated by a pedunculated septic thrombus arising from the superior vena cava and extending into the right atrium. Removal of the catheter, amphotericin-B therapy, and surgical debridement were required for cure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/14. Infective right atrial thrombus: a rare complication of total parenteral nutrition in an adult.

    We describe a case of an infective right atrial thrombus, following total parenteral nutrition, in a 21-year-old woman undergoing a surgical procedure for long-standing chronic ulcerative colitis. She presented with high temperature and the illness did not respond to antibiotic therapy. A 2-dimensional echocardiogram showed a mobile right atrial mass that at surgery was identified as a thrombus. Thrombus cultures grew coagulase-negative staphylococcus aureus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/14. Cardiovascular complications of parenteral nutrition.

    During a 3 year period, 1987-1989, we encountered three major complications associated with parenteral nutrition leading to congestive cardiac failure--acute beriberi, right atrial and superior vena caval thrombosis, and fungal endocarditis. Unrecognized, these are invariably fatal. Persistent vomiting from intestinal obstruction led to the development of thiamine deficiency in the patient with beriberi. Recurrent catheter tip sepsis probably accounted for thrombosis and endocarditis in the second and third cases, respectively. These conditions are preventable with careful attention to nutritional replenishment and aseptic technique. In patients with catheter-related sepsis early, repeated blood culture is of diagnostic value. patients with staphylococcus aureus catheter-associated bacteraemia require at least 4 weeks of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recurrent sepsis, especially when associated with pulmonary embolic phenomena, is an indication for echocardiography.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/14. Cardiac diphtheria in a previously immunized individual.

    A previously healthy 19-year-old Asian female without significant past medical history presented to the emergency room complaining of a sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, fever, swollen neck, malaise, and myalgia for three to four days. The patient was initially seen at an outside hospital, evaluated by an ear, nose, and throat physician (ENT), and was found to have desquamative pharyngitis. The patient was transferred to our hospital after she continued to experience progressively worsening shortness of breath and went into acute respiratory distress. The patient was found to have laryngeal edema on exam with greenish-black, necrotic-looking tissue extending to the hypopharynx, nasopharynx, and oropharynx. A culture was taken. ENT was consulted for tracheostomy placement. The patient refused to have tracheostomy placed. She went into severe respiratory distress and required urgent tracheostomy. A cardiac consult was obtained. A 2D echocardiogram performed one day after admission revealed an ejection fraction (EF) of 10-20%, normal left ventricular cavity size, normal wall thickness, and severe global systolic dysfunction. There was mild to moderate mitral regurgitation and trace tricuspid regurgitation. The inferior vena cava was dilated and a 1 cm x 1.5 cm questionable mass or thrombus was seen. The patient's throat culture was positive for diphtheria. The CDC was contacted, and the patient was treated with antitoxin with prompt resolution of cardiac symptoms. A repeat echo done five days post-treatment showed improved EF of 65%, normal left ventricular thickness and function, with no clot visualized. She was treated with ceftriaxone and flagyl for ocular motor neuritis, otitis media, and strep. pneumonia with gradual improvement. These were all secondary to the diphtheria toxins, however, the patient continues to be followed as an outpatient by ENT for ongoing problems with swallowing, speech, and trach management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/14. Mural thrombi in children: potentially lethal complication of central venous hyperalimentation.

    While benefits of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are well documented in a wide range of surgical conditions, deaths of two children secondary to mural thrombi from central venous catheters underscore the potential risks of such therapy. With the proven accuracy and widespread availability of echocardiography for diagnosis of mural thrombi, routine surveillance of all patients receiving TPN via central venous catheters is recommended, if fevers are present or if candida is isolated on blood cultures. While treatment may involve surgical intervention, most mural thrombi will respond to thrombolytic agents. New approaches to long-term venous access are needed to prevent this lethal complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/14. Cardiovascular complications of tropical pyomyositis.

    Clinical observations are described in 13 cases of pyomyositis with various cardiovascular complications: (a) pyogenic pericarditis (10 cases) with tamponade in 7 and myopericarditis in 1 case, and (b) acute bacterial endocarditis (3 cases). blood cultures grew staphylococcus aureus in all 3 with endocarditis and in 5 of 10 with pericarditis. These complications probably resulted from the bacteraemia which sometimes complicates pyomyositis. Enhanced susceptibility of cardiac muscles to infection in pyomyositis however remains another possibility.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/14. Intracardiac infections due to coagulase-negative Staphylococcus associated with Hickman catheters.

    Three bone marrow transplant recipients experienced right-sided intracardiac infection due to coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infection associated with Hickman catheter use. In each case, multiple blood cultures yielded coagulase-negative Staphylococcus organisms, and echocardiography demonstrated mass lesions or vegetations in the right atrium. Two patients appeared to have infected intracardiac thrombi without definite valvular involvement, whereas one had both an atrial mass and a tricuspid valve vegetation. All patients were treated with catheter removal and 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy, and one patient required cardiac surgery after failure of antibiotic therapy and an apparent paradoxic embolus to the central nervous system. Intracardiac infection is a rare but potentially fatal complication of Hickman catheter use. echocardiography may be useful in establishing the diagnosis in suspected cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Heart Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.