Cases reported "Heart Injuries"

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1/104. Intraoperative left ventricular perforation with false aneurysm formation.

    Two cases of perforation of the left ventricle during mitral valve replacement are described. In the first case there was perforation at the site of papillary muscle excision and this was recognized and successfully treated. However, a true ventricular aneurysm developed at the repair site. One month after operation rupture of the left ventricle occurred at a second and separate site on the posterior aspect of the atrioventricular ring. This resulted in a false aneurysm which produced a pansystolic murmur mimicking mitral regurgitation. Both the true and the false aneurysm were successfully repaired. In the second case perforation occurred on the posterior aspect of the atrioventricular ring and was successfully repaired. However, a false ventricular aneurysm developed and ruptured into the left atrium producing severe, but silent, mitral regurgitation. This was recognized and successfully repaired. The implications of these cases are discussed.
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2/104. fatal outcome arising from use of a sutureless "corkscrew" epicardial pacing electrode inserted into apex of left ventricle.

    A 59-year-old man is described in whom the insertion of an epicardial sutureless "corkscrew" electrode resulted in fatal ventricular perforation. Fatal myocardial perforation can occur with this electrode and the apex of the left ventricle should never be used as the site of insertion. Necropsy also showed that the transvenous right ventricular electrode, inserted one year previously, had penetrated a tricuspid leaflet. This could have accounted for the ensuing pacing failure.
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3/104. Prolonged activity after an ultimately fatal gunshot wound to the heart: case report.

    In this article, we describe an unusual case of suicide involving a gunshot wound to the left ventricle. The victim engaged in premortem activity that was both prolonged and methodical. This report stresses the importance of a complete investigation to distinguish such case from an homicide.
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4/104. Recurrent pericardial effusion due to gunshot wound of the heart in a hemodynamically stable child--a case report.

    A 12-year-old girl presented with recurrent pericardial effusion due to firearm pellet injury to the left ventricle. The pellet was localized by two-dimensional echocardiography within the left ventricular apical wall. Since the patient was asymptomatic, left ventriculotomy was avoided to extract the pellet and only pericardial tube drainage was carried out. A slightly elevated blood lead level of the patient was alarming for potential subsequent lead poisoning due to retained pellets.
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5/104. Successful repair of blunt cardiac rupture involving both ventricles.

    Blunt cardiac rupture occurs infrequently and is usually lethal. Successful repairs of isolated atrial or ventricular ruptures have been reported when the diagnosis is made early. Our patient sustained blunt cardiac rupture of both ventricles in a motor vehicle accident. The diagnosis was made during emergency exploratory laparotomy when her vital signs deteriorated without obvious cause. A large Satinsky clamp was placed across the apices of the right and left ventricle to control hemorrhage while the repair was done without cardiopulmonary bypass. She survived and was discharged to home with a normal echocardiogram.
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6/104. Blunt cardiac rupture: the utility of emergency department ultrasound.

    BACKGROUND: rupture of the heart is usually a fatal injury in patients sustaining blunt trauma. Those arriving in the emergency department alive can be saved with prompt diagnosis and treatment. methods: We describe the cases of 4 consecutive patients with rupture of the free cardiac wall whom we treated at Grady Hospital. Two had a tear of the right ventricle, 1 had a tear of the right atrium, and 1 had two tears of the left atrium. All patients were involved in motor vehicle accidents. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound in 3 patients and during exploratory surgical intervention in the other. All tears were repaired primarily without the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. RESULTS: Three of the patients survived, and 1 died. CONCLUSIONS: Rarely are patients with rupture of the free cardiac wall seen in an emergency department. The improvements in the prehospital care and the transportation may result in an increase in the numbers of such patients. physicians treating patients with blunt trauma must suspect the presence of cardiac rupture. Immediate use of ultrasonography will establish the diagnosis and prompt repair of the injury may improve overall survival.
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7/104. Indwelling catheter-induced right ventricular rupture.

    We describe a case of a 68-year-old man who, because of postoperative mediastinitis, underwent a multiple muscle flap closure of the mediastinum. A chronic indwelling catheter led to erosion and rupture of the anterior wall of the right ventricle. The near exsanguinating hemorrhage was corrected under circulatory arrest. A pericardial patch repair was performed with good results.
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8/104. Iaterogenic injuries during retrograde delivery of cardioplegia.

    During last eight years, retrograde delivery of cardioplegia was used on a regular basis, utilizing a DLP INC (Grand Rapids, MI) or a research Medical INC (Salt Lake City UT) delivery systems, in almost an equal number of patients. This method resulted in a high pressure rupture, or perforation of the coronary sinus, its radicals or the right ventricle (RV) in 0.06% (5/7886) of patients. Intraoperative diagnosis of these injuries were confirmed on abnormal haemodynamic tracings and trans oesophageal echocardiography (TOE), and appearance of cardiac contusion or leakage of cardioplegia. A low incidence of these iaterogenic injuries may be attributed to: (1) a regular use of this method and (2) use of TOE guided manipulations in select high risk and reoperative patients. Repair of these injuries, as described, resulted in salvage of 4/5 (80%) patients.
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9/104. rupture of the coronary artery after blunt nonpenetrating chest wall trauma detected by color Doppler echocardiography: a case report.

    We report a rare case of a ruptured papillary muscle of the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve and the rupture of the septal branch of the left anterior descending coronary artery with drainage into the right ventricle after blunt nonpenetrating chest wall trauma. Both abnormalities were detected by transthoracic 2-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography, and the septal branch rupture was confirmed by coronary angiography. The leading echocardiographic sign of the rupture of the coronary artery was intramyocardial mosaic-colored flow, representing the turbulent high-velocity flow in the ruptured coronary artery. Hypokinesis of the anteroseptal myocardial segments and the presence of Q waves in leads V1 through 4 on the electro-cardiogram were suggestive of anteroseptal myocardial infarction. We conclude that the history of chest trauma, the electrocardiographic changes, and wall motion abnormalities should be stimuli for a careful color Doppler flow "mapping" of the myocardium for possible identification of a coronary artery rupture.
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10/104. Iatrogenic right ventricular laceration: delayed presentation after abdominal surgery.

    A 69-year-old man presented at our emergency department in marginal hemodynamic condition due to hemorrhagic shock and cardiac tamponade. Two months earlier, he had undergone total gastrectomy and left lobe hepatectomy for invasive gastric cancer. Delayed iatrogenic laceration of the right ventricle, consequent to the abdominal procedure, was the uncommon cause of the massive hemopericardium. To our knowledge, this is only the 2nd case in the literature of a cardiac laceration after abdominal surgery.
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