Cases reported "Heart Murmurs"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Telangiectatic fistula between the conal branch of the left coronary artery and the pulmonary trunk.

    A rare case of telangiectatic communication between the conal branch of the left coronary artery and the pulmonary trunk in a 50-year-old woman is reported. Unusual features included the presence of clear-cut angina on effort, unstable auscultatory findings and a RSR' pattern in lead V1, probably related to concommitant diffuse coronary atherosclerosis. Ten previously reported cases of the condition are briefly reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Giant congenital coronary artery fistula to left brachial vein clearly detected by multidetector computed tomography.

    Coronary artery fistulas (CAF) are a rare anomaly in which there is communication between a coronary artery and a cardiac chamber or another vascular structure. A giant congenital CAF to the left brachial vein was identified clearly by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in an 84-year-old woman who presented with orthopnea and continuous murmur. Electrocardiogram was almost normal, but chest X-ray showed marked cardiomegaly with pulmonary congestion. Transthoracic echocardiography showed that the wall motion of the left ventricle (LV) was normal, but with an abnormal cavity behind the LV. CAF was suspected and coronary angiography revealed that the CAF originated from the right coronary artery (RCA), connected to the giant vessel. However, because the drainage site was not clearly detected, MDCT was performed and it became clear that the CAF originated from the RCA. The left circumflex artery flowed into the giant vessel, and drained to the left brachial vein.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Asymptomatic left and right coronary artery-left ventricular fistula in an elderly patient with a diastolic murmur only.

    A 62-year-old woman who had a diastolic murmur was found to have an unusual type of coronary arterial fistula between bilateral coronary arteries and the left ventricle by selective coronary angiography. This anomaly appeared to be of no functional significance. The diastolic murmur was the only audible sign of the fistulous communications in this case.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Unusual arteriovenous communications presenting as cardiac murmurs in infancy. Report of three cases.

    Three cases are decribed of infants presenting with murmurs in, or adjacent to, the thorax and considered to be cardiac. Later full investigations established that the murmurs were due to aorto-azygos fistula, vertebral arterio-venous fistula and intercostal angioma, respectively. While such lesions are extremely rare, the possibility of systemic arteriovenous communication should be considered in infants with atypical murmurs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Left ventricular-coronary sinus fistula following repeated mitral valve replacements.

    After mitral valve replacement, symptomatic deterioration and new murmurs characterstistic of atrioventricular valvular regurgitation are usually the result of periprosthetic leaks or prosthetic dysfunction with or without endocarditis. In the case which we are reporting, an iatrogenic fistula between the left ventricle and coronary sinus was responsible for the murmur and symptoms. This type of shunt has not been previously reported. Thorough debridement of the anulus is necessary during mitral valve replacement; additionally, previously implanted prostheses are occasionally embedded in the endocardial wall and must be excised. hematoma in the atrioventricular groove and perforations of the posterior left ventricular wall are widely recognized complications of mitral valve replacement. Similar mechanisms of injury can cause other problems such as left ventricular-right atrial communications and the unique anatomic shunt described in this report.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. Continuous precordial murmur due to congenital fistula between the femoral artery and the superior vena cava.

    An unusual case of arteriovenous communication between the left inferior epigastric artery, a branch of the femoral artery, and the superior vena cava is presented. The communication caused a continuous murmur at the lower parasternal area and was responsible for a significant left-to-right shunt. Surgical treatment, which consisted of ligation of the aberrant artery at its origin, was followed by disappearance of the precordial murmur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Right pulmonary artery to left atrium communication. An unusual cause of cyanosis in the newborn.

    A one-day-old newborn infant presented with intense cyanosis, a continuous murmur, and mild congestive heart failure. The chest roentgenogram showed an abnormal right-heart border, and the echocardiogram demonstrated enlargement of the left ventricle and left atrium. cardiac catheterization and angiography demonstrated a right pulmonary artery to left atrium communication. The infant responded favorably to medical management and is asymptomatic with the exception of mild cyanosis with crying. Right pulmonary artery to left atrium communication is a rare but potentially correctable cause of cyanosis in the newborn.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. Three main coronary arteries to pulmonary artery fistula.

    A case of a 19-year-old woman with coronary artery fistula was reported. She was asymptomatic throughout her life. physical examination revealed a continuous murmur along the left sternal border. Echocardiograms and left ventriculograms showed mitral valve prolapse. Selective coronary arteriograms disclosed arteriovenous fistula between branches of the right, the left anterior descending and the left circumflex coronary artery and the main pulmonary trunk. We believe that this is the first case report of an unusual form of anomalous coronary-pulmonary artery communication: three main coronary vessels participate in the fistula.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Heart Murmurs'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.