Cases reported "Heartburn"

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1/9. Does chemoprevention of Barrett's esophagus using acid suppression and/or COX-2 inhibition prevent neoplastic progression?

    Barrett's esophagus--intestinal metaplasia within the tubular esophagus - is a premalignant histologic lesion and a marker of cancer risk. Strategies to prevent Barrett's-related esophageal cancer have focused on reversal of Barrett's using pharmacological or surgical antireflux therapies and endoscopically-induced injury. Currently, however, there is little compelling evidence to support the reversal of Barrett's through pharmacological or surgical therapy, and endoscopic reversal of Barrett's has not yet been validated. chemoprevention using intensive acid suppression and/or inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs remains a biologically plausible strategy that is supported by a rapidly growing body of scientific evidence. Data suggest that a combination of acid suppression with COX-2 inhibition might be the most effective chemopreventive strategy. Whether this approach is effective awaits the results of well-designed outcomes studies.
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2/9. air swallowing can be responsible for non-response of heartburn to high-dose proton pump inhibitor.

    Intraluminal electrical impedance is a novel technique, which is able for the first time to provide a qualitative assessment of refluxed material moving from the stomach to the oesophagus. In other words, the presence of air can be differentiated from that of liquid, because the former is characterised by high and the latter by low impedance compared with baseline. Moreover, the combined measurement of electrical impedance and pH-metry permits to distinguish acid from non-acid liquid reflux. One of the most important clinical applications of this method is to assess the reasons for poor response of GORD patients to high-dose proton pump inhibitors. This case report describes the results of impedance in the evaluation of a young woman, who did not respond to twice-daily doses of rabeprazole. She continued to complain of heartburn as major symptom and impedance allowed us to clarify that it was not related to acid or non-acid reflux, but to air swallowing. Therefore, this technique identified aerophagia to be responsible for persistent heartburn despite high-dose proton pump inhibitor and prevented the adoption of more aggressive, but probably unuseful therapies, such as the surgical one.
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3/9. heartburn and multiple-site foregut perforations as primary manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    SUMMARY: Crohn's disease may affect any segment of the digestive tract, more commonly the distal ileum, colon and/or perianal region. There is an increasing number of reports dealing with foregut Crohn's disease. We present the case of a patient with a history of heartburn and multiple spontaneous perforations of the esophagus, duodenum and jejunum as a primary manifestation of Crohn's disease who required emergency surgical and endoscopic procedures. Early detection of Crohn's disease may decrease the incidence of acute life-threatening complications provided that appropriate medical treatment is administered and a multidisciplinary approach is offered to these patients.
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4/9. Esophageal motility, heartburn, and gastroesophageal reflux: variations in clinical presentation of esophageal dysphagia.

    Dysphagia is a potentially important symptom, often leading to the finding of an anatomical or motility disorder of the esophagus. Dysphagia and heartburn represent two of the most common symptoms associated with esophageal motility disorders. To explore the relationship of symptomatic esophageal dysphagia and heartburn and their association with primary esophageal motor disorders, we have performed a retrospective assessment of 1035 patient evaluations performed at our gastrointestinal laboratory. A clear statistical association of symptomatic dysphagia and heartburn was established; however, no pattern diagnostic of a specific motility disorder was discernible. A sizable fraction of our patient population with dysphagia demonstrated normal esophageal motility. A significant portion of dyspeptic patients exhibited both normal motility and acid exposure. The differences observed between the incidence of subjective symptoms and objective dysfunction may be explained in part by an altered or increased esophageal sensitivity of these patients.
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5/9. Rumination, heartburn, and daytime gastroesophageal reflux. A case study with mechanisms defined and successfully treated with biofeedback therapy.

    A 31-year-old man with a 19-year history of rumination developed frequent episodes of heartburn and regurgitation associated with acid gastroesophageal reflux that occurred predominantly during the day. This reflux and its attendant symptoms resulted from abdominal muscle contractions at the time of gastroesophageal pressure equilibration (i.e., common cavity phenomena) consistent with the egress of air from the stomach to the esophagus. A voluntary pharyngeal maneuver unassociated with swallowing but simultaneous with the abdominal contraction resulted in a decrease in upper esophageal sphincter pressure. This lowered pressure facilitated acid esophagopharyngeal regurgitation at a velocity of 100 cm/s. Biofeedback therapy directed at relaxing the abdominal muscles during eating and avoiding the pharyngeal maneuver resulted in a decrease in reflux and marked improvement in symptoms.
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6/9. Barrett's esophagus in a patient with achalasia.

    Barrett's esophagus has been reported in patients with achalasia who have undergone esophagomyotomy. The condition was thought to be acquired from gastroesophageal reflux secondary to the iatrogenically produced incompetent sphincter. We present the case of a patient with Barrett's esophagus and achalasia without any previous surgical intervention.
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7/9. head and neck manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux.

    gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common condition with many manifestations which are of interest to the otolaryngologist. Factors predisposing to GER include anatomic abnormalities of the esophagus and pharynx, neurogenic disease and diet induced decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Three interesting cases are reported, including subglottic stenosis which has not previously been thought to be a complication of GER. A literature review of otolaryngologic symptoms, the problems of diagnosis, and a suggested treatment plan are presented.
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8/9. sialorrhea and gastroesophageal reflux.

    It is not unusual for patients who are pregnant or have a hiatal hernia to develop gatroesophageal reflux with the resultant symptoms of heartburn. This article reviews the role reflux plays in causing episodes of increased salivation. Stimulation of the esophagus by gastric acids excites and esophagosalivary reflex. A marked increase in salivary flow ensues, neutralizing the acid content of the esophagus. The dental practitioner is in a strategic position to be consulted about or recognize the existence of the esophagosalivary reflex and the consequent bouts of sialorrhea. Recognition mandates medical consultation.
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9/9. Esophageal anisakiasis accompanied by reflux esophagitis.

    A case with esophageal anisakiasis accompanied by reflux esophagitis is described. A 38-year-old man visited our hospital with complaints of heartburn and disturbance of food passage about seven hours after eating raw cuttlefish. The first esophagogastroscopy revealed an anisakis larva invading the squamocolumnar junction. Near the anisakis larva, a whitish exudate was demonstrated in the distal esophagus just proximal to the squamocolumnar junction. An anisakis larva was easily extracted from the esophagus by forceps. Reflux esophagitis with whitish exudative mucosal lesions and an area of linear erythema more than 5mm long were noted endoscopically 8 weeks after treatment with lansoprazole and cisapride. After six months the third endoscopic examination clarified that there was neither exudate nor erythema in the distal esophagus. Judging from the clinical course that he complained of newly experienced heartburn about seven hours after eating raw cuttlefish, and that whitish exudative mucosal lesions and an area of linear erythema did not disappear at three months after extraction of the anisakis larva. It was concluded that an anisakis larva enters the stomach first and then returns to the esophagus by gastroesophageal reflux.
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