Cases reported "Hemangioma, Cavernous"

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1/41. prenatal diagnosis of fetal cerebellar lesions: a case report and review of the literature.

    The fetal cerebellar structure, size and consistency are looked at in every system survey. Among the acquired cerebellar events that might change the cerebellar consistency are haemorrhage, infections in utero and neoplasia. Additional fetal malformations, if present, assist in making the final diagnosis. We present a case of an isolated echogenic mass in one of the cerebellar hemispheres along with the differential diagnosis.
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keywords = haemorrhage
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2/41. Multiple calvarial haemangiomas.

    Calvarial haemangiomas are rare benign tumours that may be suspected by their characteristic expansile 'sunburst' appearance. It is important to recognize them as such and to make the surgeon aware of haemorrhage after biopsy or resection.
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3/41. radiosurgery for hemangiomas of the cavernous sinus and orbit: technical case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Hemangiomas of neurosurgical interest are histologically benign vascular tumors that most often occur in the orbit or cavernous sinus. Hemangiomas can be diagnosed by their characteristic radiographic and angiographic appearance and their tendency to bleed excessively during attempted removal. Intracranial or intraorbital hemangiomas require treatment when they become symptomatic. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We report four hemangioma patients who presented with ocular symptoms or signs, such as orbital pain, ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, or impaired visual acuity. Before our evaluation, two patients had each had incomplete resections aborted because of excessive blood loss, one patient had undergone a nondiagnostic transsphenoidal biopsy, and one patient had had an unsuccessful embolization. INTERVENTION: All four patients were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Tumors received a minimal tumor dose that ranged from 14 to 19 Gy. Follow-up evaluations were performed 6 to 24 months after radiosurgery and revealed a reduction in tumor volume in three patients and no tumor progression in the fourth. All patients had symptomatic improvement, but one had persistent diplopia. CONCLUSION: In this early experience, stereotactic radiosurgery proved to be an effective management strategy that avoided the potentially serious complications associated with surgery or embolization of cavernous sinus hemangiomas.
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ranking = 2.4474777446685
keywords = blood loss
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4/41. Cavernous haemangioma of the retina and optic disc. A report of three cases and a review of the literature.

    We report characteristics of three cases of cavernous haemangioma of the retina, bringing to 37 the number now reported in the available literature. This rare, benign, congenital malformation is non-progressive, usually unilateral, somewhat more frequent in women, and rarely a source of intraocular haemorrhage. The fluorescein angiographic features include a normal arterial and venous supply, extraordinarily slowed venous drainage, no arterio-venous shunting, no disturbances of vascular permeability, and no secondary retinal exudation. Almost always, isolated clusters of vascular globules with plasma/erythrocyte sedimentation surround the main body of the malformation. These findings differentiate the anomaly from other retinal vascular diseases. Therapeutic intervention is seldom necessary.
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keywords = haemorrhage
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5/41. Bleeding from a cavernous angioma mimicking rupture of a middle cerebral artery aneurysm.

    Cavernous angiomas and aneurysms may both present with acute cerebral haemorrhage. We present a case in which the coexistence of an unruptured aneurysm obscured the diagnosis of cerebral haemorrhage from a cavernous angioma. Although this association was presumably coincidental, this case demonstrates that obvious pathology (an angiographically proven aneurysm at the site of haemorrhage) may reduce awareness of other, possibly more common, causes of cerebral haemorrhage.
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ranking = 4
keywords = haemorrhage
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6/41. Cerebral cavernous haemangiomas or cavernomas. incidence, pathology, localization, diagnosis, clinical features and treatment. review of the literature and report of an unusual case.

    Reviewing the literature and adding one unusual case the features of 164 cerebral cavernous haemangiomas are described with special reference to incidence, localization, diagnosis and clinical findings. Cavernomas may be found in every age group including the neonatal period. The sex incidence is equal. In 126 cases (76.8%) the cavernomas were of supratentorial, in 34 cases (20.7%) of infratentorial site, and in 4 more cases (2.5%) there was multiple occurence of supratentorial and posterior fossa cavernous haemangiomas. A specific clinical syndrome could not be defined: but the course is usually acute or subacute, and initial symptoms are commonly epileptic fits, acute headache and subarachnoid or intracerebral haemorrhage. Macroscopic calcifications of cerebral cavernomas were found only in 18 cases (11%). cerebral angiography was done in 31 cases (18.9%). In 9 cases angiography was totally normal, and in 11 cases the cavernoma presented only as an avascular mass. In the remaining cases there was no conformity in the angiographic appearance of cerebral cavernous haemangiomas. Operative extirpation is the treatment of choice if a solitary lesion is favourably located. In addition to our patient there are now 21 cases (12.8%) in which cavernomas were treated successfully by operative extirpation.
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keywords = haemorrhage
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7/41. Controversies in the management of brainstem cavernous angioma: report of two cases.

    Two cases of cavernous angioma involving the medulla oblongata are presented. Both cases underwent surgical excision with excellent outcome. The use of surgery via craniectomy is contrasted with stereotactic radiosurgery in light of the known natural history of the lesions. As a result, it is suggested that surgical excision provides immediate protection from the risks of recurrent haemorrhage, establishes a tissue diagnosis, allows complete removal at the primary intervention, avoids complications of radiation-induced damage and is performed more easily in these vascular anomalies due to the presence of a capsule with surrounding gliotic tissue. Additionally, it is implied that the natural history of lesions in this region is still unclear. For these reasons, it is suggested that surgical excision should be the primary therapeutic intervention for cavernous angiomata that involve the brainstem.
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keywords = haemorrhage
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8/41. Cavernous haemangioma of the temporal bone.

    Cavernous haemangioma of the temporal bone is a rare lesion and nearly always of limited extent. A case of a large and rapidly progressive temporal bone haemangioma in a child is presented. Negative angiography led to biopsy at which profuse and troublesome haemorrhage was encountered. Subsequent Red blood Cell labelled scan demonstrated blood pooling in the lesion. The combination of positive RBC labelled scan and negative angiography can only occur in lesions in which blood pooling takes place, enabling biopsy with its hazards to be avoided. The tumour was resected using a skull base, infratemporal approach. morbidity was minimal. There was no evidence of recurrence at a 15 month follow-up.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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9/41. Pyogenic abscess complicating a resolving cerebral haematoma secondary to a cavernous haemangioma: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    A case is discussed of a brain abscess complicating an intracerebral haemorrhage occurring in a cavernous haemangioma. A young child presented with focal seizures as a result of a large intracerebral haemorrhage, occurring in a cavernous haemangioma. The only clue to the underlying vascular malformation was the presence of an associated developmental venous anomaly. The case was complicated by the development of a brain abscess at the site of the intracranial haematoma. The CT and MRI findings are discussed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = haemorrhage
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10/41. Cavernous hemangioma: diffuse enlarged venous spaces within the myometrium in pregnancy.

    BACKGROUND: Diffuse enlarged vessels throughout the myometrium are very rare. This case illustrates the diagnosis and clinical management of a pregnancy complicated by large vessels diffusely distributed throughout the myometrium. CASE: A primigravida measured large for dates at 27 weeks gestation. ultrasonography demonstrated tubular echolucent spaces throughout the myometrium. No flow could be detected within them by color or spectral Doppler. During cesarean delivery blood loss was 1,700 mL, but the uterus was successfully closed with 3 suture layers. A biopsy specimen showed myometrium containing large vascular spaces thought to be veins, consistent with a hemangioma. CONCLUSION: Enlarged vascular spaces diffusely distributed throughout the myometrium proved to be a cavernous hemangioma. Cesarean delivery in the present case produced some additional bleeding that was easily controlled, and the uterus was closed without incident.
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ranking = 2.4474777446685
keywords = blood loss
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