Cases reported "Hemangioma, Cavernous"

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1/149. Complete paraplegia due to multiple intracerebral and spinal cavernomas.

    We report on a 29-year-old male patient with multiple intracerebral and spinal cavernomas. Bleeding in the thoracic cord at admission and additional bleeding which occurred 12 days later in the cervical cord resulted in complete paraplegia below thoracic level 4 (Th4). Four years earlier multiple cerebral cavernomas had been diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Based upon reported cases in the literature multiple intracerebral and spinal cavernomas are exceptional. Additionally, the clinical presentation in our case is uncommon.
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keywords = cerebral
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2/149. Intraventricular cavernomas: three cases and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Cavernomas occur very rarely in the ventricular system. We report three cases of intraventricular cavernomas and review the literature. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 16-year-old female patient presented with a sudden distal deficit of the left superior limb. She had a voluminous tumor involving the two lateral ventricles, with radiological evidence of recent hemorrhage. A 30-year-old man presented with generalized seizures and a right hemiplegia related to a 4-cm-diameter cavernoma in the two lateral ventricles involving the interhemispheric scissure through the corpus callosum and left centrum ovale. The radiological appearance was not typical and did not allow the diagnosis. A 42-year-old man had a cavernoma in the third ventricle, which was responsible for his short-term memory loss. This cavernoma had been revealed by computed tomography that was performed after intracerebral hemorrhage related to another cavernoma in the right parietal lobe occurred. INTERVENTION: Stereotactic biopsies allowed the diagnosis of intraventricular cavernoma in the first case. Surgical removal via a right transcortical transventricular approach and a transcallosal approach in the first and second cases, respectively, was complete, resulting in good outcomes. Surgical removal via a right transcortical transventricular approach in the third case was partial. CONCLUSION: Intraventricular cavernomas are so uncommon that only 42 well-documented cases have been previously reported in the literature. It seems that their radiological diagnosis may be difficult because of their uncommon location in the ventricular system and their voluminous size. A wrong preoperative diagnosis has sometimes been the cause of inefficient therapy, such as radiotherapy, for these surgically curable benign lesions.
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ranking = 0.52977395094601
keywords = cerebral, ventricle
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3/149. noonan syndrome and cavernous hemangioma of the brain.

    We present two patients with multiple characteristics that occur in Noonan phenotype and cavernous hemangioma of the brain. The first patient, who had been diagnosed radiographically as having a cavernous hemangioma in the left basal ganglia at age 15 years, developed massive intracerebral hemorrhage, resulting in sudden death at home at 19 years. The second patient, who was diagnosed radiographically as having a cavernous hemangioma in the left parietal lobe at age 17 years, is being followed carefully (the patient is currently 18 years old). A review disclosed four cases of structural cerebrovascular abnormalities with or without subsequent hemorrhage. Neither these four patients nor our two patients had any severe anomalies in the heart or large vessels, which are frequently seen in patients with noonan syndrome. Cerebrovascular abnormalities might have a significant influence on the prognosis of patients with noonan syndrome, especially those having no severe abnormalities in the heart or large vessels.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = cerebral
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4/149. Surgery of angiomas in the brainstem with a stress on the presence of telangiectasia.

    This report deals with the surgery of angiomas other than arteriovenous malformation in the brainstem. The surgical cases were three cavernomas, two telangiectasias, and two venous malformations. We performed surgery when an angioma bled and the resulting hematoma was situated near the surface of the brainstem or the fourth ventricle. The cases were operated on at the subacute or chronic stages after hemorrhage. Although a magnetic resonance (MR) image showed a subacute or chronic localized hematoma with a low intensity rim, the case was not always a cavernoma, but a telangiectasia. Cavernomas could be totally removed, but telangiectasia could not. In the cases of medullary venous malformation the diagnosis was obtained radiologically, and when the hematoma was large, only hematoma evacuation was performed. In all cases the postoperative Karnofsky scores were improved or unchanged. Postoperative rebleeding in the hematoma cavity continued insidiously in a case of telangiectasia. The abnormal vessels of telangiectasia in the brainstem were preoperatively not visualized by cerebral angiography or MR imaging, but became visualized by enhanced MR imaging after evacuation of hematoma in two cases. It is stressed that an angioma with a hematoma intensity core surrounded by a low intensity rim on MR images is not always a cavernoma, but possibly is a telangiectasia.
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ranking = 0.2718294122201
keywords = cerebral, ventricle
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5/149. hemangioma calcificans. Case report of an intraparenchymatous calcified vascular hematoma with epileptogenic potential.

    A middle-aged woman, with a previous history of medically suppressed absence attacks, presented with mild changes in mental status and a skull film demonstrating several areas of mottled, granular, intracranial calcifications. These lesions, although readily visible on computerized tomography, appeared avascular during the course of cerebral angiography. At the time of surgery the masses, which were densely calcified and generally circular, demonstrated numerous areas of superficial, white, verrucous excrescences. Microscopic, pathological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of hemangioma calcificans. The literature describing this rare entity is briefly reviewed.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = cerebral
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6/149. Massive subependymal hemorrhage caused by an occult vascular malformation--two case reports.

    Two patients presented with massive subependymal hemorrhage caused by vascular anomalies occult to angiography, computed tomography (CT) scanning, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A 47-year-old male initially presented with a headache and became comatose 3 weeks later. CT and MR imaging demonstrated a massive hematoma in the right caudate head projecting into the lateral ventricle. A 60-year-old male sustained heaviness of his left extremities 8 days prior to admission and his condition gradually deteriorated. neuroimaging revealed a right thalamic hematoma adjacent to the lateral ventricle. cerebral angiography, CT, and MR imaging failed to detect any vascular anomaly. The hematomas increased in size gradually and were surgically explored. The histological diagnosis was arteriovenous malformation for the first case and cavernous angioma for the second case that had ruptured repeatedly. These cases were unique in the unusual location in the subependyma, and diagnostic neuroimaging modalities could not disclose the vascular anomalies, and the hematomas enlarged progressively to become critically symptomatic. Surgical intervention is mandatory for mass reduction and correct diagnosis of such lesions, with favorable outcome as long as the surgery is not delayed until too late.
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ranking = 0.25794453872591
keywords = ventricle
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7/149. Growing patterns of cavernous angioma in the fourth ventricle. Case report.

    Cavernous malformations are vascular lesions that occur in all parts of the central nervous system but most commonly in the cerebral hemispheres; unusually they may be found along the midline (basal ganglia, pineal region or brain stem), into the ventricle possibly encroaching upon the fourth and third ventricle. We report a case of midline cavernomas of the IV ventricle, that grew to large size in-time, demonstrating the capacity for rapid expansion.
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ranking = 1.0456630283978
keywords = cerebral, ventricle
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8/149. Diffuse liver angiosarcoma and cerebral cavernous angiomas in a young patient.

    A case of a thirty-nine year old woman with cerebral cavernous angiomas who developed anaemia and thrombocytopenia secondary to diffuse liver angiosarcoma is reported. This unique association of liver angiosarcoma and cerebral cavernous angiomas may suggest that this tumour may potentially develop from benign vascular lesions. Hematologic abnormalities in angiosarcomas are moreover reviewed based on recent literature search.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = cerebral
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9/149. Inhibitory simple partial (non-convulsive) status epilepticus after intracranial surgery.

    OBJECTIVES: To report on five patients who developed, 2 to 4 days after an intracranial neurosurgical procedure, new, persistent, focal neurological deficits which were due to inhibitory simple partial (non-convulsive) status epilepticus, and resolved with anticonvulsant treatment. methods: The age range of the five patients was 15-74 years. The operations were: aneurysm clipping (three patients) and resections of an oligodendroglioma and a cavernous haemangioma (one patient each). The new focal deficits were: right hemiparesis and aphasia (two patients), aphasia alone (two patients), and left hemiparesis (one patient). The deficits were not explained by CT (obtained in all patients) or cerebral angiography (performed in two). RESULTS: electroencephalography showed, in all patients, continuous or intermittent focal seizures arising from cortex regionally relevant to the clinical dysfunction. Subtle positive epileptic phenomena (jerking) occurred intermittently in three patients as a late concommitant. Administration of anticonvulsant drugs resulted in significant improvement within 24 hours in four patients, with parallel resolution of ictal EEG activity. The fifth patient improved more slowly. Two patients relapsed when anticonvulsant concentrations fell, and improved again when they were raised. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that inhibitory simple partial (non-convulsive) status epilepticus be considered in the differential diagnosis when a new unexplained neurological deficit develops after an intracranial neurosurgical procedure. An EEG may help to diagnose this condition, leading to definitive treatment.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = cerebral
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10/149. Neurocutaneous vascular hamartomas mimicking Cobb syndrome. Case report.

    The authors report the rare case of a patient with neurocutaneous vascular hamartomas mimicking Cobb syndrome. An 8-year-old boy was admitted to the authors' hospital with progressive urinary disturbance and upper back pain. Multiple skin nevi had been noted at the child's birth. Radiological examination revealed multiple cavernous angiomas in the spinal cord in the same metamere in which the skin nevi had been observed and also in the left cerebral hemisphere. His symptoms gradually improved without surgical intervention. Four years later he was readmitted because of a cerebral hemorrhage involving the left cerebral peduncle. Nonsurgical treatment was chosen because his symptoms promptly improved. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of multiple cavernous angiomas in the brain and spinal cord associated with skin nevi. The authors discuss this clinical entity and the significance of the disease.
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = cerebral
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