Cases reported "Hemangioma, Cavernous"

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1/59. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, multiple focal nodular hyperplasias, and cavernous hemangiomas of the liver.

    Malignant vascular neoplasms of the liver are uncommon. We report the case of a young woman who developed an epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the liver associated with multiple focal nodular hyperplasias and hepatic cavernous hemangiomas. Such an unusual association is probably not fortuitous and could support the theory that focal nodular hyperplasia is a reaction to an abnormal vascular supply rather than a true neoplasm.
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keywords = neoplasm
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2/59. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists.
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3/59. hemobilia, intrahepatic hematoma and acute thrombosis with cavernomatous transformation of the portal vein after percutaneous thermoablation of a liver metastasis.

    A 53-year-old-man underwent US-guided percutaneous thermal ablation with a cooled-tip needle of three liver metastases from gastric cancer. Six days later, the patient was re-admitted for melena, scleral jaundice, and anemia. Abdominal US disclosed echogenic material in the gallbladder lumen (hemobilia) and a focal lesion with mixed echotexture in segment III (hepatic hematoma). On day 5 portal cavernomatosis was diagnosed at US and confirmed by color Doppler and a helical CT exam. The case described emphasizes that radio-frequency interstitial hyperthermia may cause not only traumatic injury of the liver parenchyma but also thermally mediated damage of vascular structures.
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ranking = 0.0059598733380592
keywords = cancer
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4/59. Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the orbit.

    PURPOSE: Primary orbital intraosseous hemangioma is a rare, benign neoplasm presenting most frequently in patients in their fourth or fifth decade of life. We describe an elderly patient affected by this tumor. methods: Case report. RESULTS: A 75-year-old man presented with a slowly growing, bony mass in the left orbital rim inferolaterally. He had a history of nephrectomy because of a renal carcinoma. Computed tomography showed a bony lesion with internal radiating trabeculations. A biopsy was performed. Histopathologically, the tumor was an intraosseous cavernous hemangioma. CONCLUSION: Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the orbit may infrequently affect elderly patients. One indication for surgical removal of these tumors in the absence of visual disturbances is to rule out metastatic disease in patients with a history of malignancy.
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keywords = neoplasm
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5/59. Calvarial hemangiomas: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Primary hemangiomas of the bone are uncommon tumors, accounting for less than 1.0% of all bone neoplasms. These tumors are mostly found in vertebral bodies. Hemangiomas are rarely seen in the calvarium, where their frequency is 0.2% of all bone neoplasms. Because of their infrequent appearance in the skull, vague symptoms, and absence of prototypical radiological findings, these tumors can be missed in many cases or may be misinterpreted as more ominous lesions like multiple myeloma or osteosarcoma. CASE DESCRIPTION: We report two cases of calvarial hemangiomas: one with a single mass on the right sphenoid wing, and another with two similar lesions on the right occipital and left parietal bones. The diagnoses could be established only by histopathologic analysis. CONCLUSION: Histopathologic confirmation of the tumor is the definitive method for diagnosis of intraosseous hemangiomas. Radiological findings are not always characteristic for calvarial hemangiomas. Due to possible complications and the possibility of effective treatment, this lesion should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of skull lesions.
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keywords = neoplasm
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6/59. radiation-induced cavernous angioma mimicking metastatic disease.

    patients with carcinoma of the lung typically have a limited life expectancy especially after developing metastatic disease in the brain. New enhancing lesions in the brain are usually felt to represent new areas of metastasis. Recently, there have been several case reports of cavernous angiomas appearing years after radiation to the brain, typically in children. We present a case of a 41-year-old gentleman with carcinoma of the lung with metastasis to the brain who received postoperative radiation. Five-and-a-half years later he presented with a new enhancing lesion of the brain with surrounding vasogenic oedema, thought to represent a metastatic tumour. It proved is the a radiation-induced cavernous angioma.
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keywords = radiation-induced
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7/59. Cancer of the thyroid following radium application to the neck.

    A young patient, suffering from thyroid carcinoma 24 years after radium treatment of the neck, is presented. The cancer appeared in the area which has been irradiated. In the present case, the thyroid was exposed to a relatively low dose of radiation. The importance of ionizing radiation and its carcinogenic effect in the juvenile thyroid are discussed.
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ranking = 0.0059598733380592
keywords = cancer
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8/59. Cavernous haemangioma of the internal auditory canal.

    Cavernous haemangioma is a rare neoplasm that can be easily misdiagnosed as acoustic neuroma when it occurs in the internal auditory canal (IAC) or cerebello-pontine angle. A right cavernous haemangioma is reported in a 61-year-old male. The lesion was associated with non-pulsative tinnitus, deteriorating hearing loss and facial nerve dysfunction (House and Brackmann grade IV). A T1-weighted Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced MRI scan demonstrated a small hyperintense lesion confined to the right IAC. The tumor was completely resected via a retrosigmoidal approach. Histologic examination demonstrated a vascular tumor composed of an irregular, dilated vascular space with collagenous walls lined by a vascular endothelium. facial nerve function remained unchanged and the patient remained well with no evidence of recurrence 2 years after surgery. We conclude that progressive hearing loss associated with facial nerve dysfunction, particularly when the lesion in the IAC is small, should raise the possibility of cavernous haemangioma.
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keywords = neoplasm
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9/59. MRI diagnosis of brainstem cavernous angiomas presenting as tumours.

    We report experience with 11 patients misdiagnosed for years, on the basis of computed tomography (CT) and angiography, as harbouring brainstem tumours in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated cavernous angiomas. Seven had undergone external irradiation, 2 had a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, 2 developed aseptic femur necrosis following corticosteroid treatment, 1 had undergone a biopsy with a pathological diagnosis of glioma. CT had depicted ill-defined, hyperdense, faintly enhancing lesions. angiography was normal, or showed an avascular mass or subtle venous pooling. MRI delineated discrete lesions, typical of cavernous angiomas, with a mixed hyperintense, reticulated, central core surrounded by a hypointense rim. Six patients subsequently underwent stereotactic radiosurgery without changes in clinical status or lesion. Although hemorrhagic neoplasms may mimic the clinical course and MRI appearance of cavernous angiomas, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of brainstem cavernous angiomas and should be performed in patients with suspected brainstem tumours.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = neoplasm
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10/59. Controversies in the management of brainstem cavernous angioma: report of two cases.

    Two cases of cavernous angioma involving the medulla oblongata are presented. Both cases underwent surgical excision with excellent outcome. The use of surgery via craniectomy is contrasted with stereotactic radiosurgery in light of the known natural history of the lesions. As a result, it is suggested that surgical excision provides immediate protection from the risks of recurrent haemorrhage, establishes a tissue diagnosis, allows complete removal at the primary intervention, avoids complications of radiation-induced damage and is performed more easily in these vascular anomalies due to the presence of a capsule with surrounding gliotic tissue. Additionally, it is implied that the natural history of lesions in this region is still unclear. For these reasons, it is suggested that surgical excision should be the primary therapeutic intervention for cavernous angiomata that involve the brainstem.
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ranking = 50.554568595055
keywords = radiation-induced
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