Cases reported "Hemangioma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/69. Haemangioma of bone with radiographic appearances simulating a giant cell tumour.

    A case is described of haemangioma of the proximal end of the humerus which simulated a giant cell tumour on radiography. An attempt at biopsy, carried out elsewhere, had failed because of severe haemorrhage from the tumour during operation. It was treated by en bloc resection and endoprosthesis with a good result after one year.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/69. A case of intra-abdominal multiple lymphangiomas in an adult in whom the immunological evaluation supported the diagnosis.

    A 60-year-old patient with intra-abdominal lymphangiomatosis is described. He presented with anaemia due to enteric haemorrhage, hypoproteinaemia with heavy hypogammaglobulinaemia and T-cell lymphopenia. Duodenal biopsy showed lymphangiectasia while a small bowel study revealed several filling defects in the terminal ileum. On exploratory laparotomy, numerous inoperable lymphangio-haemangiomata were found, involving the small and large intestine, appendix, mesenterium, gallbladder and main biliary tract. The importance of T-cell lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinaemia in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal lymphangiomatosis with lymphangiectasia is stressed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/69. Diagnostics and surgical treatment strategy for rectal cavernous hemangiomas based on three case examples.

    A 20-year-old man with a congenital vascular malformation extending from the anal canal into the distal sigmoid had had recurrent perianal blood loss as a neonate. A hemangioma was diagnosed for the first time in 1978. The patient received regular and frequent gastroenterological treatment until admission. Decisive for the indication for surgery was the patient's need for blood infusions and shorter bleeding intervals in June 1998. Surgical therapy consisted of deep anterior rectosigmoid resection with coloanal pouch anastomosis. In a second case of a 27-year-old woman a sigmoid hemangioma was diagnosed in conjunction with emergency sigmoid resectioning. Because of recurrent hemorrhages a coloanal pouch was also established here in a second step. The third case involved a 19-year-old woman with a 12-year history of repeated perianal hemorrhages. After sigmoid discontinuity resection we carried out proctectomy with descendostoma creation due to renewed severe intractable perianal bleeding. The histological examination revealed a rectal hemangioma that had caused the repeated perianal hemorrhages. Surgical reconstruction was then achieved by coloanal pouch anastomosis. In view of the good functional and perioperative results, current surgical therapy should aim at preserving continuity and continence by coloanal pouch anastomosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.7082096742692
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/69. Solitary osseous hemangioma outside the spinal and craniofacial bones.

    Bone hemangioma is mainly seen in the skull and spine, and rarely occurs in other bones. We report herein four cases of osseous hemangioma arising in rare sites: In two cases, on a rib; a faintly painful mass in one case located on the scapula; and progressive pain in one case located on the ischium. The tumors presented clinically as incidental lesions on radiographs. All cases had an aggressive appearance, such as defect of the cortex, a soft-tissue mass, and a sunburst-like appearance. Markedly high signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images was a characteristic finding. Open biopsy resulted in severe blood loss, but needle biopsy was performed safely under computed tomography guidance. It is important to note that bone hemangiomas may be misdiagnosed as malignant tumors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.7082096742692
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/69. Hemangiomas of the cecum. Colonoscopic diagnosis and therapy.

    Five cases of hemangiomas of the cecum and gastrointestinal bleeding are presented. All were demonstrated by colonscopy after more conventional diagnostic methods failed. The hemangiomas were bright red, flat lesions clearly seen through the colonscope. They were successfully treated by electrocoagulation. All patients in this series had some type of associated cardiac or vascular disease. These patients may represent a syndrome of gastrointestinal blood loss of obscure cause, hemangiomas of the cecum, and cardiovascular disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.7082096742692
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/69. Cavernous haemangioma of the retina and optic disc. A report of three cases and a review of the literature.

    We report characteristics of three cases of cavernous haemangioma of the retina, bringing to 37 the number now reported in the available literature. This rare, benign, congenital malformation is non-progressive, usually unilateral, somewhat more frequent in women, and rarely a source of intraocular haemorrhage. The fluorescein angiographic features include a normal arterial and venous supply, extraordinarily slowed venous drainage, no arterio-venous shunting, no disturbances of vascular permeability, and no secondary retinal exudation. Almost always, isolated clusters of vascular globules with plasma/erythrocyte sedimentation surround the main body of the malformation. These findings differentiate the anomaly from other retinal vascular diseases. Therapeutic intervention is seldom necessary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/69. Enteroscopy as a tool for diagnosing gastrointestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion.

    iron-deficiency anemia secondary to gastrointestinal blood loss is a common cause of hospitalization. In many cases, the bleeding site cannot be defined despite thorough routine examination of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to evaluate push enteroscopy as a diagnostic tool in patients with severe anemia, secondary to recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, that required management by transfusion. Thirty-five consecutive push enteroscopy investigations were performed in 1998 and 1999 on 25 patients (15 men, 10 women). Mean age was 57 /- 16 years (range, 33-83). All patients had received blood transfusions because of pronounced anemia secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding. Before push enteroscopy, all patients had been investigated with esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, and small-bowel radiography using the double contrast technique; no bleeding site was found. In addition, 10 of 25 patients had been investigated beforehand with 99mTc-labelled red blood cell scintigraphy, and 5 of 25 with scintigraphy for meckel diverticulum. Two patients were also investigated with angiography before the push enteroscopy, and in six patients an additional total intraoperative enteroscopy was performed, preceded by a new colonoscopy, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and push enteroscopy. A bleeding site was disclosed in 15 of 25 (60%) patients. In 7 of 25 patients (28%) the bleeding site was found in the stomach or esophagus. even though the patients had undergone one or two esophagogastroduodenoscopies earlier with normal findings. Total intraoperative enteroscopy identified a bleeding site in four of six (67%) patients studied. Two patients had bleeding hemangiomas that were resected surgically. Two patients had small intestinal adenomas, one with adenocarcinoma in situ. Push enteroscopy performed with an overtube inserted under fluoroscopic guidance is an important diagnostic tool in patients in whom conventional examinations do not disclose bleeding sites. Interestingly, 28% of patients had bleeding within reach of the gastroscope, indicating that a new upper endoscopy should be recommended before push enteroscopy is performed. When no positive findings are seen on push enteroscopy and the patient is affected by severe, recurrent iron-deficiency anemia, total intraoperative enteroscopy should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.7082096742692
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/69. liver transplantation for massive hepatic haemangiomatosis causing restrictive lung disease.

    A 34-yr-old man with hepatic haemangiomatosis presented for orthotopic liver transplantation. His massively distended abdomen caused thoracic compression and severe restrictive lung disease. Respiratory failure was the principal indication for transplantation. Increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension caused by aorto-caval compression, and blood loss, complicated the intra-operative anaesthetic management. weaning from mechanical ventilation was impaired by acute and chronic metabolic alkalosis, and diaphragmatic laxity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.7082096742692
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/69. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome and gastrointestinal haemorrhage: which treatment?

    PURPOSE: To describe a paediatric case of "Blue rubber Bleb nevus syndrome" (BRBNS) or Bean's syndrome, a rare systemic disorder characterised by cutaneous and gastrointestinal vascular malformations that often lead to overt life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding or occult blood loss with severe anaemia and iron deficiency. CASE REPORT: A 6-year-old girl with multiple characteristic cutaneous vascular lesions was admitted for a massive rectal bleeding. A few months previously she was endoscopically treated for gastric angiomas which developed into melaena. Preoperative investigations revealed the recurrence of gastric lesions. At laparotomy, more than 25 angiomas of the GI tract were found. Multiple intestinal resections were carried out. RESULTS: No intraoperative or postoperative problems occurred and the girl is completely healthy without further bleeding after a follow-up period of three years. CONCLUSIONS: BRBNS belongs to the group of vascular venous malformations. Most of the time it occurs sporadically, but it can be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Recent analysis identified a locus on chromosome 9 responsible for venous malformations. BRBNS patients present typical skin lesions, with some lesions having a rubber-like nipple appearance; the number of skin and GI lesions and the severity of anaemia are correlated. Treatment is dependent on the extent of gut involvement and the severity of the clinical picture. In the absence of massive bleeding, a conservative treatment will be sufficient; otherwise resections are mandatory, but additional lesions may subsequently develop. Management with electrocautery or laser photocoagulation are usually not effective even if some reports recommend them. Pharmacological treatment is useless. prognosis of BRBNS is unknown.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 11.708209674269
keywords = blood loss, haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/69. Different types of embolization before surgical excision of haemangiomas of the face.

    The management of hemangiomas of the face depends on several clinical factors. Many treatments have been recommended for the management of patients with hemangiomas. However, most of them have not shown good results in terms of post-treatment morphology and function of the organs. Surgery of these benign lesions can at times be disfiguring, especially when the lips, muscles, or the maxilla are involved. In addition, by the very nature of these lesions, surgical treatment may be associated with excessive intra and perioperative blood loss. As an alternative to surgical excision, different types of embolization treatments have been developed for all types of hemangiomas. In many instances the procedure was performed preoperatively or intraoperatively. The various therapeutic embolizations, if performed correctly, lead to a significant reduction in the blood flow within the angiomatous mass. Different types of embolization of the lesions and subsequent surgical extirpation can be considered the method of choice in the treatment of voluminous hemangiomas of the face.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.7082096742692
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hemangioma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.