Cases reported "Hemangioma"

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1/98. A rare case of intramuscular haemangioma in a six-year-old boy--a diagnostic dilemma.

    Intramuscular haemangiomas are uncommon tumours of the head and neck, occurring mainly in adults and usually located in the region of the masseter muscle and parotid gland. We report the case of a child with an intramuscular haemangioma over the left maxilla, which caused some diagnostic confusion in view of its atypical location combined with the unusual age and inflammatory mode of presentation.
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2/98. Intramuscular haemangioma of head and neck region.

    Intramuscular haemangiomas are rare benign haemangiomas occurring within the skeletal muscle. These are uncommon tumours in the head and neck region and occur most frequently on the trunk and extremities. Fewer than 80 cases of intra-muscular haemangioma in the head and neck region have been reported in the literature. A case of intramuscular haemangioma of the sternocleidomastoid muscle is presented. The review of occurrence and natural history of such tumours is described and clinical and radiological presentation, histological classifications and treatment modalities are discussed.
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3/98. Intramuscular hemangioma of the masseter muscle.

    Intramuscular hemangiomas (IMH) are uncommon tumors of the head and neck, but often occur in the trunk and extremities. When present in the head, the masseter muscle is the most frequently involved site, although constituting only 0.8% of all hemangiomas. Accurate preoperative diagnosis is uncommon without cytology or biopsy. A case of IMH of the masseter muscle in a 24-year-old Turkish woman is presented. Clinical, radiologic and histologic findings and treatment modalities are reviewed.
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4/98. Echo-enhancing sonography of a large-vessel hemangioma of the neck.

    Because of the slow flow in the venous spaces of large-vessel hemangiomas, demonstration of color flow signals with conventional color Doppler or power Doppler sonography may be difficult. We report the case of a 22-year-old female patient with a soft tissue tumor containing multiple fluid-filled spaces in the right supraclavicular region. Gray-scale, color, and power Doppler sonography could not differentiate between cystic lymphangioma and large-vessel hemangioma. The intravenous echo-enhancing contrast agent Levovist was administered, and a significant echo-enhancing effect on color and power Doppler imaging was demonstrated in the fluid-filled spaces and lasted for about 3 minutes. Histopathologic study of the excised tumor confirmed the sonographic diagnosis of hemangioma. Levovist appears useful in depicting slow flow in a large-vessel hemangioma.
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5/98. External jugular vein hemangioma occurring as a lateral neck mass.

    hemangioma is an extremely frequent tumor, accounting for 7% of all benign neoplasms. In contrast, hemangioma arising in blood vessels is rare and should be differentiated from other neoplasms of vascular origin, such as hemangioendothelioma, hemangiopericytoma, hemangiosarcoma, and leiomyosarcoma. The case we report has the peculiarity of occurring as a lateral neck mass in which color-coded duplex sonography contributed significantly to diagnosis.
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6/98. Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    We describe the case of a 5-year-old boy found to have an enlarging mass of the posterior neck. The patient underwent an uneventful excision of the mass, and pathologic examination revealed it to be an angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. This case report presents a review of the recent literature of this rare soft tissue tumor.
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7/98. Temporoparietal fascial flap in orbital reconstruction.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the success of the temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF) in the primary or secondary reconstruction of difficult orbital defects and to review the surgical techniques. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: Tertiary medical center. patients: Nine patients with diverse orbital cavity or periorbital soft tissue and bony defects due to trauma, benign or malignant neoplasms, and radiation treatment. INTERVENTIONS: Temporoparietal fascial flap anatomy and techniques of harvest and inset are reviewed in detail. Four cases are presented to illustrate possible variables in orbital reconstruction. Variables examined include the location of defects, the success of flap survival in orbital cavities after primary or secondary reconstruction, the effects of prior irradiation on flap survival, and the possibility of concurrent osteointegrated implant placement with TPFF reconstruction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Functional and aesthetic outcomes were determined by physical examination and preoperative and postoperative photographs. RESULTS: All patients had successful transfer of TPFF grafts without flap compromise. Temporoparietal fascial flap was a viable option for subtle orbital and malar contour defects. In chronically inflamed wounds such as with osteoradionecrosis and orbitoantral fistula, TPFF successfully restored vascularity, obliterated the defects, and enabled the placement of osteointegrated implants. The TPFF also supported the concurrent placement of a free calvarial bone graft. Finally, split-thickness skin grafted onto a pedicled TPFF showed 100% survival. CONCLUSIONS: The TPFF is one of the most reliable and versatile regional flaps in the head and neck for orbital reconstruction. This study presents the use of TPFF in a variety of orbital defects, from lateral bony rim defects to total exenteration. Timing of repair in this study spans from immediate reconstruction to reconstruction delayed more than 50 years after the initial injury. In all cases, reconstruction with TPFF resulted in improved bony and soft tissue contours, and incurred minimal morbidity.
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8/98. Prenatal MRI in a fetus with a giant neck hemangioma: a case report.

    We report a fetus with a giant neck hemangioma which was examined by MRI in utero. The initial diagnosis was made by ultrasonography. The sonolucent aspect of the mass, together with the presence of pulsating Doppler flow signals, was highly suggestive of a fetal hemangioma. In late pregnancy, fetal MRI revealed the location, size and characteristics of the neck tumor. Following prenatal corticosteroid treatment and premature delivery of the pregnancy due to fetal cardiac failure, the newborn received angiography and coil embolization of the tumor vessels. Despite vigorous treatments, the newborn died 12 h after birth. Evaluation of a fetal neck hemangioma by MRI is recommended late in pregnancy for precise information on the tumor and adjacent organs since the image is valuable for planning optimal perinatal treatment.
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9/98. Fine needle aspiration cytology of cellular hemangioma of infancy. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Cellular hemangioma is a common benign vascular neoplasm of infants and children. The lesion typically occurs within the superficial dermis, where it is recognized as a strawberry nevus. Occasionally, this neoplasm is situated within deep soft tissues of the head or neck, with a particular predilection for the parotid gland region. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of cellular hemangioma involving the parotid gland has been reported previously, but never confirmed by cytologic findings alone. We report the first case of infantile cellular hemangioma with sufficient characteristic cytologic features to be diagnosed by FNAC. CASE: A 3-month-old male presented with a rapidly enlarging, sensitive, solid, supraparotid mass. Ultrasound and computed tomography were performed but were nondiagnostic. Subsequent FNAC of the mass demonstrated a highly cellular specimen composed predominantly of elongated spindled cells arranged in three-dimensional coils and arcades. immunohistochemistry demonstrated the endothelial origin of the spindled cells and confirmed the diagnosis of cellular hemangioma. CONCLUSION: Deeply situated cellular hemangiomas may pose a difficult diagnostic challenge to the clinician as well as to the radiologist. The infantile variant of this tumor enlarges rapidly, simulating an aggressive malignant tumor, and is occasionally accompanied by substantial compressive symptoms. Radiographic presentation of the lesion may be that of a solid tumor mass, unlike most other hemangiomas. Precise cytologic diagnosis of infantile cellular hemangioma can be rendered on aspirated material and is crucial in planning conservative medical treatment.
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10/98. Thyroid hemangioma.

    A case is presented of a fifty-six year old man with a thyroid hemangioma presenting as a neck mass with tracheal deviation and unilateral vocal cord paralysis. A standard thyroid scan yielded equivocal findings. The diagnosis was determined preoperatively by the use of a 99m-technetium angiogram that disclosed the vascular nature of the lesion. Subsequent arteriography demonstrated the main arterial supply of the mass to be from both inferior thyroid arteries. Operative removal of the mass was accomplished through a standard transverse cervical incision. Pathologic study revealed that the vascular tumor involved both the surrounding normal thyroid parenchyma and also a microfollicular adenoma. This case points out the value of utilizing all available diagnostic means in atypical cases of thyroid disease.
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