Cases reported "Hemangiosarcoma"

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1/246. Angiosarcoma. A rare secondary malignancy after breast cancer treatment.

    life-saving mastectomy and radiation therapy are established in the treatment of early stage breast cancer. Angiosarcoma, i.e. malignant angioendothelioma, is a rare tumor which can develop after several years of such treatment. The number of post-operative and post-irradiation angiosarcomas has increased in recent years. We report four cases of angiosarcoma which occurred after treatment of breast cancer and review the literature. In two of these cases the angiosarcoma developed on the irradiated breast skin after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy, in the other two cases the angiosarcoma appeared on a chronically edematous arm after radical mastectomy and radiation therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
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2/246. Intra-abdominal angiosarcomatosis after radiotherapy.

    BACKGROUND: We report a case of a 61-year-old Japanese woman who developed intra-abdominal angiosarcomatosis 20 years after receiving radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. methods AND RESULTS: The surgically resected portion of the ileum showed diffuse proliferating angiosarcoma, with irregular channels lined by atypical vascular endothelial cells. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the tumour cells were positive for factor viii-related antigen and ulex europaeus agglutinin 1. At autopsy, the tumour had disseminated to the peritoneum and invaded into the right thoracic cavity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings were compatible with radiation-induced angiosarcomatosis.
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ranking = 42.327285058746
keywords = radiation-induced
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3/246. Angiosarcoma of the chest wall.

    Angiosarcoma is a rare and highly malignant tumor of vascular origin. The causative factors include trauma, radiation, foreign bodies, thorium dioxide, and viral infections. We report a case of angiosarcoma occurring in a thoracotomy incision 17 years after operation for stage I lung cancer.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = cancer
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4/246. gliosarcoma with angiosarcomatous features: a case report.

    A surgical case of gliosarcoma in which the mesenchymal component showed angiosarcomatous features is reported. The neoplasm was extirpated from the right cerebral hemisphere of a 76-year-old man who presented with left hemiparesis and headache, and it was composed of both anaplastic astrocytomatous and sarcomatous elements. The sarcomatous element was composed of a proliferation of atypical endothelial cells that had pleomorphic, mitotically active nuclei and formed vascular lumina of irregular shapes or solid cellular sheets, and was accompanied by the deposition of collagenous matrix. The cytoplasm of some of the atypical endothelial cells was immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, factor viii-related antigen, CD 34, and thrombomodulin. The MIB-1 labeling index of the sarcomatous component was higher than that of the astrocytomatous component.
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ranking = 2.1547731416611
keywords = neoplasm
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5/246. Angiosarcoma of the testis.

    A primary angiosarcoma of the testis in a 74-year-old patient was a highly anaplastic epthelioid angiosarcoma, which was positive for endothelial markers immunohistochemically. The tumour was unrelated to testicular germ cell neoplasm; the patient had received no previous radiation or chemotherapy.
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ranking = 2.1547731416611
keywords = neoplasm
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6/246. Cardiac angiosarcoma: early diagnosis. A case report.

    Malignant tumours are rare and their diagnostic verification is more frequent at a post-mortem examination. We present a clinical case of a angiosarcoma of the atrium dextrum in a patient where the diagnosis was done precociously. The clinical case we are describing presents some characteristics not noted in literature. The patient did not present any other clinical signs other than giving assumption of the presence of neoplasm and/or secondary localization. The transthoracic echographic exam revealed the methodology to enable the removal of the neoplasm, the outline of which, was better defined with the transesophageal probe.
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ranking = 4.3095462833223
keywords = neoplasm
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7/246. Ruptured primary splenic angiosarcoma into the colon. Presentation as anal bleeding.

    A 71-year-old woman presented with a six month history of constipation and abdominal discomfort, with anal bleeding during the last days. ultrasonography and CT-scan of the abdomen showed a large heterogeneous mass that was located in the splenic region, but the nature and origin of the tumour could not be clearly established preoperatively. The clinical diagnosis was of abdominal tumour with colonic and splenic involvement, and a left hemicolectomy and splenectomy were performed. Pathologic examination revealed a primary angiosarcoma of the spleen with penetration and fistulization of the tumour into the large bowel. The patient received adjuvant radiation therapy, but she died of extensive metastastic disease from her primary angiosarcoma of the spleen nine months after surgery. In summary, splenic angiosarcoma is very difficult to diagnose preoperatively. This highly aggressive neoplasm has an overall poor prognosis, specially if it is associated with rupture and haemoperitoneum. As this case highlights, unusual forms of rupture may lead to atypical clinical presentations, increasing even more the difficulty in the diagnosis.
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ranking = 2.1547731416611
keywords = neoplasm
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8/246. Fine-needle aspiration cytologic features of pseudovascular adenoid squamous-cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Pseudovascular adenoid squamous-cell carcinoma (PASCC) is an epithelial malignancy with spindle-cell features that can mimic vascular neoplasms, particularly angiosarcoma, in its morphologic characteristics. There have been only a few surgical pathology reports of PASCC arising in the lung, skin, and breast. We describe the fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytologic and histologic features of a pulmonary PASCC in a 66-yr-old man. The aspiration yielded individually scattered and syncytial fragments of malignant epithelioid-appearing cells with oval to spindle shapes, prominent nucleoli, and a finely vacuolated amphophilic cytoplasm. The core needle biopsy specimen displayed these same cells lining pseudoluminal spaces, with intervening bundles of fibroconnective tissue simulating a vascular neoplasm. The neoplastic cells stained positively with cytokeratin (AE-1/3), epithelial membrane antigen, and vimentin and were nonreactive with S-100, muscle-specific actin, CD31, CD34, and carcinoembryonic antigen. These cytologic, histologic, and immunocytochemical features supported a diagnosis of PASCC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the FNA cytologic features of this pseudovascular variant of adenoid squamous-cell carcinoma. This FNA case illustrates that the cytologic impression was more accurate and, in fact, that the histologic features of PASCC can be misleading. The correct identification of PASCC and its distinction from angiosarcoma has important clinical ramifications for treatment and prognosis. FNA cytologic examination with ancillary studies is a minimally invasive procedure that can distinguish PASCC from sarcomatous lesions. Diagn. Cytopathol. 1999;21:265-270.
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ranking = 4.3095462833223
keywords = neoplasm
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9/246. Angiosarcoma of the scalp.

    An 82-year-old woman was seen at our dermatology Department for a plaque on the right parietal scalp that had recently increased in size, and bled. The lesion had been present for 3 months. The patient had a previous diagnosis of chronic bronchitis, noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, but no previous history of cancer. physical examination revealed a 7 x 10 cm plaque, composed of a central necrotic and bleeding surface, surrounded by small purple-red satellite nodules. A biopsy showed an ill-defined infiltrative intradermal mass with a pattern of hypercellular sheets of large cells alternating with areas of dilated, irregular, blood-filled channels, dissecting the collagen bundles. The endothelial cells lining these channels were plump and pleomorphic, surrounded by other spindle-shaped cells with pleomorphic and atypical nuclei. The diagnosis of angiosarcoma was made, and the patient was sent to an oncology center for further evaluation and treatment, where a computed tomography head scan was taken revealing no erosion of the skull. The patient refused surgery, so radiotherapy was proposed. One month later, she developed lymph node enlargement of the left anterior cervical nodes. A needle aspiration biopsy was consistent with sarcoma. Two weeks later, she was started on palliative radiotherapy: a programmed dose of 4500 cGy was proposed of which she only received 3000 cGy because of treatment withdrawal and loss to follow-up. During this time, she showed partial initial response, but despite treatment the disease relentlessly progressed, with hemorrhage and severe pain being the most striking features.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = cancer
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10/246. Primary uterine angiosarcoma.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the first case of primary uterine angiosarcoma described in a Hispanic American woman and to review the literature on uterine angiosarcomas. We review characteristic presenting symptoms, gross and microscopic pathologic findings, and treatment outcomes where available. methods: A case report is presented with a review of the English language literature via a medline search. The key phrases used in the search were uterine angiosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, hemangioendothelioma, and primary uterine neoplasm. RESULTS: Since the first report in 1902, there have been 19 reported cases of primary uterine angiosarcoma considered valid. Many early cases are questioned due to the lack of ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence available in later cases. Seventy-four percent (14 of 19) of these patients are perimenopausal with a mean age of 55 years (range 17-76 years). The common presenting findings are a pelvic mass, menorrhagia, and weight loss. Varying regimens of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been utilized with limited success. CONCLUSIONS: Primary uterine angiosarcomas tend to exhibit a highly malignant behavior. The predominant prognostic factor seems to be the size of the tumor at diagnosis and the presence of extrapelvic disease. recurrence occurs on average at 8.2 months. Of evaluable patients (n = 14), at 12 months the survival was only 43%. Although radiation and chemotherapy are options being utilized, no consensus exists for optimal therapy given the few cases from which to draw conclusions. Regardless of treatment, outcome is usually poor.
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ranking = 2.1547731416611
keywords = neoplasm
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