Cases reported "Hematemesis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/36. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization.

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/36. Cholecystogastric fistula presenting with haematemesis: diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.

    The case is reported of a 72-year-old woman suffering from morbid obesity, who presented with haematemesis while on anti-coagulant therapy. The source of the bleeding proved to be the gastric exit of a cholecystogastric fistula. Subsequent cholangitis was successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) while simultaneously the extent of the fistula was established. cholecystectomy and closure of the fistula was contraindicated because of her morbid obesity. She remained well for 6 months but then presented with a gallstone ileus while another stone was found to be escaping from the gastric fistula. Her morbid obesity resulted in surgical procrastination, which eventually proved fatal. This patient experienced both of the most common types of complication in cholecysto-enteral fistulation, cholangitis and gallstone ileus. Although cholecysto-enteral fistulas (CEF) are probably less common than several decades ago, they are now most likely to be diagnosed during ERC. Gastroenterologists therefore need to be aware of their potential to contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of this surgical condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/36. Gastric sarcoidosis presenting with haematemesis.

    sarcoidosis is a very rare disease in singapore. Sarcoid granuloma involving the stomach alone is even more rare, and only about 21 cases have been reported in the literature up to 1953 (Scott et alii, 1953). In a review of the literature, Wadina and Melamed (1966) found 34 cases of granulomatous involvement of the stomach, all purporting to be sarcoidosis. However, on closer examination of the evidence, many of these 34 cases of so-called sarcoidosis of the stomach were subject to doubt. Bleeding from gastric sarcoidosis is also rare, and only about eight cases have been reported in the literature up to 1970. The present report presents a further example of this rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and attempts to review the significance of sarcoid granulomas in the stomach.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/36. Haematemesis resulting from ischaemic strangulating intestinal obstruction.

    Although bleeding into the intestinal lumen may occur in strangulating intestinal obstruction, haematemesis is infrequently encountered. We report on a patient who presented with haematemesis and who had, in addition, clinical and radiological features of small bowel obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy did not locate the source of bleeding. At laparotomy, which was performed because of clinical deterioration, gangrenous strangulated small bowel secondary to adhesive obstruction was found. In a patient with non-resolving intestinal obstruction, a deterioration in the condition is a clear indication for exploration. Haematemesis occurring concurrently may be a marker of intestinal strangulation, adds strength to the indication and highlights the urgency of the need for exploration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/36. Duodenal leiomyoma--a rare cause of haematemesis.

    leiomyoma of the duodenum is a rare tumour. Small intestinal tumours contributing to upper gastrointestinal bleed is still rare. They usually present with malena and anaemia, rarely hematemesis. We report a case of leiomyoma of duodenum diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound that presented with massive haematemesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/36. splenectomy in a case of splenic vein thrombosis unmasks essential thrombocythemia.

    We report a patient with splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) in whom splenectomy resulted in the unmasking of essential thrombocythemia (ET). He had portal hypertension with haematemesis, resulting in anaemia requiring repeated blood transfusions. Investigations revealed SVT. Following splenectomy, he suffered a transient ischaemic attack episode, associated with persistent thrombocytosis (> 2000 x 10(9)/l). Other myeloproliferative disorders were excluded and a diagnosis of ET was established. He responded to hydroxyurea but, due to financial constraints, he discontinued treatment and subsequently relapsed. The association of ET with SVT is rare and the diagnosis of ET was missed initially as the platelet count was normal prior to splenectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/36. Case report: severe mercuric sulphate poisoning treated with 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulphonate and haemodiafiltration.

    INTRODUCTION: Inorganic mercury poisoning is uncommon, but when it occurs it can result in severe, life-threatening features and acute renal failure. Previous reports on the use of extracorporeal procedures such as haemodialysis and haemoperfusion have shown no significant removal of mercury. We report here the successful use of the chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulphonate (DMPS), together with continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), in a patient with severe inorganic mercury poisoning. CASE REPORT: A 40-year-old man presented with haematemesis after ingestion of 1 g mercuric sulphate and rapidly deteriorated in the emergency department, requiring intubation and ventilation. His initial blood mercury was 15 580 microg/l. At 4.5 hours after ingestion he was started on DMPS. He rapidly developed acute renal failure and so he was started on CVVHDF for renal support and in an attempt to improve mercury clearance; CVVHDF was continued for 14 days. methods: Regular ultradialysate and pre- and post-filtrate blood samples were taken and in addition all ultradialysate generated was collected to determine its mercury content. RESULTS: The total amount of mercury in the ultrafiltrate was 127 mg (12.7% of the ingested dose). The sieving coefficient ranged from 0.13 at 30-hours to 0.02 at 210-hours after ingestion. He developed no neurological features and was discharged from hospital on day 50. Five months after discharge from hospital he remained asymptomatic, with normal creatinine clearance. DISCUSSION: We describe a patient with severe inorganic mercury poisoning in whom full recovery occurred with the early use of the chelating agent DMPS and CVVHDF. There was removal of a significant amount of mercury by CVVHDF. CONCLUSION: We feel that CVVHDF should be considered in patients with inorganic mercury poisoning, particularly those who develop acute renal failure, together with meticulous supportive care and adequate doses of chelation therapy with DMPS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/36. Bleeding from an epiphrenic oesophageal diverticulum.

    A 49-year-old woman with a 2-month history of mild dysphagia and three episodes of haematemesis was found at endoscopy and barium swallow to have an epiphrenic oesophageal diverticulum containing an ulcerating crypt, but no ectopic gastric epithelium. Diverticulectomy and lower oesophageal myotomy gave a good result.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/36. Massive upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a young man: a case of Dieulafoy's syndrome.

    A 23-year-old man was admitted following a massive haematemesis. Dieulafoy's syndrome was diagnosed and the treatment was a partial proximal gastrectomy and pyloroplasty. The diagnosis and approach to surgical management of Dieulafoy's syndrome are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/36. Gastric epithelioid haemangioendothelioma: a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Vascular tumours of the stomach are rare, representing 0.9%-3.3% of all gastric neoplasms. A 58 year old man was admitted as an emergency with a one day history of haematemesis and melaena. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for a tumour in the lesser curve of the stomach. The tumour showed the characteristic histological and immunohistochemical features of epithelioid haemangioendothelioma. Surgery in the form of wide excision seems to be the treatment of choice for this rare neoplasm. This case highlights the difficulty in diagnosing this rare tumour preoperatively and emphasises the need for long term follow up in view of its uncertain metastatic potential.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hematemesis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.