Cases reported "Hematemesis"

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1/36. Jejunogastric intussusception presented with hematemesis: a case presentation and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Jejunogastric intussusception (JGI) is a rare but potentially very serious complication of gastrectomy or gastrojejunostomy. To avoid mortality early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. CASE PRESENTATION: A young man presented with epigastric pain and bilous vomiting followed by hematemesis,10 years after vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer. Emergency endoscopy showed JGI and the CT scan of the abdomen was compatible with this diagnosis. At laparotomy a retrograde type II, JGI was confirmed and managed by reduction of JGI without intestinal resection. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. CONCLUSIONS: JGI is a rare condition and less than 200 cases have been published since its first description in 1914. The clinical picture is almost diagnostic. endoscopy performed by someone familiar with this rare entity is certainly diagnostic and CT-Scan of the abdomen could also help. There is no medical treatment for acute JGI and the correct treatment is surgical intervention as soon as possible.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/36. Bouveret's syndrome presenting as upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage without hematemesis.

    A 74-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease diagnosed by endoscopy after presentation with an episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding returned 6 1/2 weeks later with a 5-day history of nausea and vomiting without associated symptoms. An ultrasound was nondiagnostic except for a large gallstone and a poorly visualized gallbladder. Repeat endoscopy revealed a hard mass that was presumed to have formed secondarily to an ulcer-induced stricture, and a 6-cm filling defect just proximal to the duodenal bulb was seen on a preoperative upper gastrointestinal series. At laparotomy the mass was actually a large gallstone and two smaller stones, which had eroded into and become impacted in the duodenal bulb creating a gastric outlet obstruction. The stones were extracted via a duodenotomy, and the remaining portion of the gallbladder was removed with repair of the cholecystoduodenal fistula. The patient was discharged home after an uncomplicated postoperative course. gastric outlet obstruction by a duodenal gallstone is a condition known as Bouveret's syndrome, which is a rare complication of gallstone disease. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is an especially rare form of presentation.
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keywords = operative
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3/36. Malignant duodenal stromal tumor: the first case report in thailand and review of the literature.

    The authors presented a middle aged Thai patient with malignant duodenal stromal tumor identified at a tertially care centre in thailand. The patient presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the small bowel endoscopy revealed a bleeding tumor mass at the fouth part of the duodenum. The patient underwent segmental duodenectomy with end to end anstosomis. The histopathology of the tumor composed of interlacing bundles of spindle cells with oval to elongated pleomorphic nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. The immunohistochemistrical study confirmed the diagnosis of malignant stromal tumor with smooth muscle differentiation. The computer tomography scan (CT scan) of the abdomen showed no evidence of metastasis. Postoperatively, the patient's clinical condition showed continuous improvement without further gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient has remained healthy up to present (six months of follow-up). A high level of suspicion to detect this malignant tumor especially in a patient presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and effective surgical treatment allow better clinical outcome in this rare and fatal malignancy.
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keywords = operative
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4/36. Brief clinical report: duodenal laceration presenting as massive hematemesis and multiple intraabdominal abscesses after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    SUMMARY: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered the gold standard for gallstone disease. Nevertheless, possible severe complications must not be underestimated. Bowel injuries are uncommon, but they are one of the most lethal technical complications of laparoscopic surgery. These injuries were commonly unrecognized at the time of procedures and were diagnosed later when the patients experienced sepsis, peritonitis, intraabdominal abscess, or enterocutaneous fistula. Although duodenal lacerations have been reported with laparoscopic cholecystectomies, they seem to be rare; approximately 30 such cases have been documented previously in the English literature. We report the case of a patient with thermal duodenal injury caused by elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy at an outside center presenting as massive hematemesis and multiple intraabdominal abscesses on the ninth postoperative day. The diagnosis and management of this rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy are described, and the literature is reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/36. Arterio-portal shunt in liver rescued by hepatectomy after arterial embolization.

    Arterio-portal shunts are generally treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, as a therapeutic measure for bleeding of esophageal varices. However, transcatheter arterial embolization is frequently associated with reestablishment of arterio-portal shunts. We now report our experience with partial hepatectomy to remove the arterio-portal shunt associated with esophageal varices, which recurred after transcatheter arterial embolization. The patient was a 60-year-old female, who had massive hematemesis caused by rupture of esophageal varices. Doppler sonography and arteriography demonstrated an arterio-portal shunt in the right anterior superior segment of the liver. Temporary hemostasis was achieved with transcatheter arterial embolization, however, hemorrhage recurred one month later. The second transcatheter arterial embolization failed to manage the shunt and varices. The patient developed hepatic coma. After recovery from coma, she was referred to our hospital. We carried out partial hepatectomy, which provided remarkable hemodynamic improvement; the portal vein flow changed from hepatofugal to hepatopetal. Esophageal varices and hepatic coma have totally disappeared. This patient has had no complaint and has remained free of esophageal varices, for 3 years postoperatively. She is having a normal life. The partial hepatectomy to remove the arterio-portal shunt induced complete resolution of the arterio-portal shunt, as well as dramatic improvement in portal flow and hepatic coma. Our experience in the present case suggests that partial hepatectomy should be considered as a radical therapy for arterio-portal shunt, without insistence on transcatheter arterial embolization.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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6/36. Aortoesophageal fistula associated with tuberculous mediastinitis, mimicking esophageal Dieulafoy's disease.

    Aortoesophageal fistula is a rare and lethal disorder that may result from primary diseases of aorta or esophagus, aortic bypass graft, ingestion of foreign body, trauma, surgical procedure or instrumentation. Tuberculous fistula is extremely rare. We present a 27-yr-old female patient with aortoesophageal fistula associated with tuberculous mediastinitis. The patient experienced massive hematemesis and esophagoscopy revealed a small mucosal defect with exudate-coated blood vessel like Dieulafoy 's lesion on about 25 cm from the incisor teeth. Despite two sessions of endoscopic hemostatic procedures, active massive hemorrhage recurred and was controlled effectively with a prompt insertion of Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. The patient underwent open thoracotomy, which revealed aortoesophageal fistula. Numerous white-yellowish, millet seed-like tubercles were scattered in pleural and abdominal cavity. Division of fistular tract and esophageal resection with Ivor-Lewis anastomosis were performed. Histopathologic study confirmed tuberculous pleuritis and peritonitis. The patient died of postoperative pulmonary complication.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/36. Arterioesophageal fistula: a rare complication of retroesophageal subclavian arteries.

    Formation of a fistula between a retroesophageal subclavian artery and the esophagus is a rare cause of hematemesis that is usually fatal. Several etiologies have been described. The purpose of this report is to describe a case involving successful surgical repair of an arterioesophageal fistula induced by prolonged nasogastric intubation. A preoperative CT scan under emergency conditions allowed tentative diagnosis. Arteriography in the operating room confirmed the presence of a fistula and also allowed temporary hemostasis by tamponade. On the basis of a review of the literature, this case demonstrates the importance of screening patients requiring prolonged nasogastric intubation to rule out the possibility of an aberrant aortic arch system.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/36. Enterogastric intussusception: a rare postoperative complication.

    The authors present a case of postoperative enterogastric intussusception after previous Billroth II-gastrectomy, associated with a Braun's W-anastomosis of the efferent small bowel loop. Loss of viability of the incarcerated jejunal loop required segmental small bowel resection. Total recovery was obtained. literature is reviewed concerning diagnosis and treatment of adult intestinal intussusception.
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ranking = 5
keywords = operative
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9/36. A rare cause of digestive hemorrhage: an aneurysm of the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery rupturing into the duodenal stump of a Billroth II partial gastrectomy.

    We report herein a case of an iatrogenic superior pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysm which ruptured into the duodenal stump of a Billroth II partial gastrectomy. Superselective angiography was used for the diagnosis, and successful embolization performed nonoperatively. A review of the literature revealed both the etiology and site of rupture in this case to be extremely uncommon.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/36. Prolapsed hyperplastic gastric polyp causing gastric outlet obstruction, hypergastrinemia, and hematemesis in an infant.

    An infant presented with hematemesis and gastric outlet obstruction. Preoperative diagnosis of duodenal duplication cyst was based on a collaboration of radiological studies. At exploration the patient was found to have a gastric polyp that had intussuscepted into the duodenum leading to obstruction and hypergastrinemia secondary to gastric mucosa in the duodenal alkaline environment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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