Cases reported "Hematologic Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Microbiological, immunological and genetic factors in family members with periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease, associated with hematological disorders.

    The microflora, immunological profiles of host defence functions, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) findings are reported for a mother, son and daughter who were diagnosed as having 'periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases, associated with hematological disorders'. Examinations were made of the bacterial flora from the periodontal pocket, neutrophil chemotaxis, neutrophil phagocytosis, and the genotypes (DQB1) and serotypes (DR locus) of HLA class II antigens. Phenotypic analyses of the peripheral lymphocytes were also conducted. The subgingival microflora from the mother was dominated by Gram-negative rods, especially porphyromonas endodontalis, prevotella intermedia/prevotella nigrescens and fusobacterium nucleatum. Subgingival microflora samples from the son and daughter were dominated by gram-positive cocci and gram-positive rods. Through the use of polymerase chain reaction, campylobacter rectus and capnocytophaga gingivalis were detected in all subjects, whereas porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, and treponema denticola were not detected in any subjects. All three subjects showed a remarkable level of depressed neutrophil chemotaxis to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, although their phagocyte function levels were normal, in comparison to healthy control subjects. Each subject had the same genotype, HLA-DQB1*0601, while the mother had HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR8, and the son and daughter had HLA-DR2 only. In summary, the members of this family showed a similar predisposition to periodontitis with regard to certain host defence functions. It is suggested that the depressed neutrophil chemotaxis that was identified here could be a significant risk factor for periodontitis in this family.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gingival
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Recurrent recalcitrant gingival hyperplasia and plasminogen deficiency: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Recurrent gingival hyperplasia due to plasminogen deficiency is a rare condition due to fibrin deposition in the connective tissue. Only eight cases have previously been reported in the English literature, and all cases were diagnosed before the age of 35 years. This paper presents an older patient with recurrent gingival hyperplasia due to plasminogen deficiency (hypoplasminogenemia). methods: A 59-year-old woman presented with recurrent gingival swelling of 6 years' duration. Multiple biopsies performed at various time periods were histologically reported to be gingival hyperplasia with chronic inflammation. Routine hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) staining and direct immunofluorescence were performed. RESULTS: H & E-stained sections showed subepithelial, eosinophilic, amorphous, acellular deposits. Direct immunofluorescence showed positive staining for fibrin, immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, and IgM. Functional plasminogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 assays were done and found to be deficient. A diagnosis of gingival hyperplasia due to plasminogen deficiency (hypoplasminogenemia) was rendered. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent gingival hyperplasia due to plasminogen deficiency (hypoplasminogenemia) is a newly recognized and rare condition. H & E staining, direct immunofluorescence, and assessment of functional plasminogen levels are essential to differentiate this condition from other conditions in which subepithelial, eosinophilic, amorphous materials are deposited.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 946.46916534747
keywords = gingival hyperplasia, gingival, hyperplasia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Destructive membranous periodontal disease (ligneous periodontitis): a case report and 3 years follow-up.

    Destructive membranous periodontal disease is a rare, destructive and poorly defined entity, which is the part of a systemic disease due to plasminogen deficiency and fibrin deposition. The disease is characterised by gingival enlargement and periodontal tissue destruction that leads to rapid tooth loss despite treatment attempts. biopsy is essential to rule out other periodontal disease in the differential diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = gingival
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. Systemic and cutaneous plasmacytosis with multiple skin lesions and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia: significant serum interleukin-6 levels.

    We report two patients who developed benign plasmacytosis with multiple skin lesions. The cases were characterized by hyperplasia of mature plasma cells, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia. One patient had hyperplasia of mature plasma cells not only in the skin, but also extensively in lymph nodes and the retroperitoneal areas around the ureters. The other had plasma cell hyperplasia limited to the skin. Extensive investigations failed to reveal any clinical or laboratory evidence suggesting the presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinaemia and/or plasma cell proliferation, such as chronic infectious disease, collagen disease or other chronic inflammatory disorder. Clinically and histologically, the first patient showed features compatible with a diagnosis of systemic plasmacytosis and the second with a diagnosis of cutaneous plasmacytosis. Significant serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were detected in both patients, suggesting that IL-6 may be involved in the pathogenesis of these conditions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.65533802143646
keywords = hyperplasia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver in hematologic disorders: a possible response to obliterative portal venopathy. A morphometric study of nine cases with an hypothesis on the pathogenesis.

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was found in nine patients who had hematological disease including polycythemia vera, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, primary thrombocythemia, rheumatoid arthritis with thrombocytosis, multiple myeloma, and erythrocytosis associated with polycystic renal disease. Portal hypertension was suspected in three and features of hypersplenism were present in four. 2. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia occurred in livers which had widespread obliteration of portal vein radicals (obliterative portal venopathy). Morphometric analysis indicated that the portal vein lesions were predominately located in veins up to 0.2 mm in diameter and were significantly more frequent than similar lesions occurring in elderly persons. 3. The following pathogenesis of nodular regenerative hyperplasia is proposed: Thrombi, perhaps largely composed of platelet aggregates formed in the portal venous circulation or spleen, embolize to the liver and results in obliterative vascular lesions. atrophy and regenerative nodule formation occur in response to the interruption of the portal blood supply.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5291220500184
keywords = hyperplasia
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Hematologic Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.