Cases reported "Hematoma, Subdural"

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21/65. Bilateral subdural hematomas diagnosed with technetium-99m-HMPAO brain SPECT.

    An elderly patient with a complex history of organic dementia but a normal neurologic examination had a 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene-amine-oxime (HMPAO) brain scan for a suspected cerebrovascular accident or space-occupying lesion. The study showed no perfusion abnormality in the brain parenchyma, but bilateral flattening and inversion of the normal hemispheric convexities, with separation from the skull was identified. Bilateral subdural hematomas (SDH) were suspected and the patient had a computed tomographic scan that confirmed the diagnosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = skull
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22/65. Evaluation of minor head trauma in children younger than two years.

    The recent medical literature emphasizes the limitations of skull films in the evaluation of minor head trauma. However, the emergency medicine literature places little emphasis on the particular risks in children younger than 2 years old with blunt head injury. These children have immature bone and unfused sutures that may increase risk of cranial injury and delayed complications. A case is presented to illustrate this point. Unlike severe head trauma, where evaluation is directed toward computed tomography, the literature continues to be controversial regarding the indications for skull radiographs and computed tomography in minor head trauma. The authors recommend a low threshold for radiographic imaging in blunt heat injuries in children younger than 2 years.
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ranking = 2
keywords = skull
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23/65. hematoma in the posterior fossa secondary to a tangential gunshot wound of the occiput: case report and discussion.

    The case of 16-year-old boy who incurred a subdural hematoma in the posterior fossa an intracerebellar hematoma after a tangential civilian gunshot wound is reported. The skull was not fractured, and yet surgically significant clots required removal. The patient recovered. The discussion centers on the mechanism of injury and seriousness of tangential gunshot wounds and traumatic hematomas in the posterior fossa.
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ranking = 1.484579854248
keywords = skull, fracture
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24/65. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematomas: "Spat-Apoplexie". Report of two cases.

    Two patients who suffered a head trauma experienced sudden clinical deterioration more than 1 week after their injury. The initial computerized tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a small hematoma underlying a depressed skull fracture in one patient and a small interhemispheric subdural hematoma in the other. Both patients had made a complete recovery and follow-up CT scans were normal when clinical deterioration suddenly occurred. Both patients developed a large intracerebral hematoma and underwent emergency evacuation of the mass. The first patient recovered with the exception of a moderate hemiparesis and dysphasia, but the second patient died. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematomas have been described in the literature. Since the advent of CT scanning, the incidence of this phenomenon has been estimated as between 1.7% and 7.4% of closed head injuries. In 1891, Otto Bollinger described four patients who suffered head injury, followed days to weeks later by death from an apoplectic event. His criteria for diagnosis of "traumatische Spat-Apoplexie" included the absence of preexisting vascular disease, a definite history of trauma, an asymptomatic interval of at least several days, and an apoplectic episode. These two cases reemphasize the existence of Spat-Apoplexie as a rare clinical condition. In the presence of CT findings of even small traumatic intracerebral or extracerebral hematomas, the possibility of this late complication should be kept in mind.
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ranking = 58.827108614487
keywords = skull fracture, skull, fracture
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25/65. Tangential low-velocity missile wound of the head with acute subdural hematoma: case report.

    Tangential missile wounds of the head without skull fracture are a known entity. Usually, references in the literature indicate that this type of injury results from a high-velocity missile impact. We present a case of a tangential missile head wound caused by a low-velocity missile. As the range of fire was short, the quantity of energy that might be released could be equated with that released by a high-velocity missile fired from a much longer range. This possibility should be brought to the attention of clinicians as an essential element in this pre-treatment clinical evaluation. We propose a pathomechanical explanation for the development of the clinical state.
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ranking = 58.827108614487
keywords = skull fracture, skull, fracture
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26/65. Ocular and associated systemic findings in suspected child abuse. A necropsy study.

    We reviewed complete ocular and systemic necropsy findings of 10 consecutive children who died of suspected child abuse. All 10 children had evidence at necropsy of blunt head trauma, although external signs of blunt trauma occasionally were covert. Ocular injuries were observed in 7 of the 10 cases and when present always included retinal, vitreous, and subdural optic nerve hemorrhages. In 5 cases, intrascleral hemorrhage from the circle of Zinn occurred at the sclera-optic nerve junction. In 4 cases, traumatic retinoschisis or tractional retinal folds were present. Anterior segment findings were uniformly consistent with blunt trauma. hemosiderin, indicating old hemorrhage, was present in 3 cases. Intracranial hemorrhage, present in all cases with abnormal ocular findings, was always accompanied by signs of direct head trauma, such as subgaleal hemorrhage, skull fracture, cerebral contusion, or external contusions, which are sometimes subtle or hidden beneath the hair.
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ranking = 58.827108614487
keywords = skull fracture, skull, fracture
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27/65. A case of subdural hematoma and temporal bone fracture as complications of chiropractic manipulation.

    We present a case of subdural hematoma and temporal bone fracture as a complication of chiropractic manipulation. Subdural hematoma in the elderly may follow insignificant, often forgotten, trauma and may develop slowly and progress. Our patient presented with a complaint of headache three days after forceful chiropractic manipulation, but denied any history of trauma. Computed tomography confirmed the presence of a subdural hematoma and a temporal bone fracture and the patient underwent successful surgical treatment. Our experience identifies a previously unreported mechanism of injury in patients with subdural hematoma presenting to the emergency department with a complaint of headache.
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ranking = 2.9074791254881
keywords = fracture
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28/65. arachnoid cysts with intracystic and subdural haematoma.

    Two cases of arachnoid cysts with acute intracystic and subdural haematomas are described. CT examination was performed in both cases, and showed a hyperdense expansion with thinning of the inner table of the skull. The different ways in which subdural haematomas associated with arachnoid cysts may be seen on CT are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = skull
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29/65. Growing fractures: an unusual complication of head injuries in pediatric patients.

    Authors analyze three cases of growing fractures they observed in infants under the age of one year. It is noticeable that in two cases, even if the lesion was already present when babies underwent the first procedure, no specific treatment was adopted, thus resulting in a progressive enlargement of the extracranial mass. Surgical treatment must be performed quickly after the diagnosis of growing fracture is done due to the necessity of an early repair of the bone defect to avoid the eventual onset of neurological deficits since they are not reversible.
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ranking = 2.9074791254881
keywords = fracture
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30/65. Calvarial erosion after scalp expansion.

    A case is described of tissue expansion of the scalp with resultant erosion of the outer table and diploe of the calvaria. This resorption may have resulted from a prolonged period of expansion, excessive tension from inflation, and/or the nature or location of the defect. In cases of scalp expansion where the loose areolar space has become obliterated, periodic limited computed tomographic scanning may be useful to monitor the integrity of the skull. Postexpansion protective headgear may be indicated in selected patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = skull
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