Cases reported "Hematoma"

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1/41. Dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus.

    The largest series of patients (n = 10) with dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is described. The typical features, chest pain with odynophagia or dysphagia and minor haematemesis are usually present but not always elicited at presentation. If elicited, these symptoms should suggest the diagnosis and avoid mistaken attribution to a cardiac origin for the pain. precipitating factors such as a forced Valsalva manoeuvre cannot be identified in at least half the cases. Early endoscopy is safe, and confirms the diagnosis when an haematoma within the oesophageal wall or the later appearances of a longitudinal ulcer are seen. Dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus has an excellent prognosis when managed conservatively.
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2/41. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the esophagus.

    Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the esophagus (SIHE) is a rare condition, usually presenting with severe acute chest pain. vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, and hematemesis may appear later. We herein report a case of this disease in a patient treated with low doses of aspirin, and review the literature for possible etiologies for this condition. In addition, we compare the utility of the various diagnostic modalities in this uncommon condition.
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keywords = esophagus
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3/41. Intramural hematoma of the esophagus: a complication of carbon tetrachloride intoxication with acute renal failure.

    Following a period of prolonged severe vomiting, an intramural esophageal hematoma could be demonstrated by endoscopy and by X-ray in a 21 year old patient with hepatic and renal failure after exposure to carbon tetrachloride. The hematoma resolved spontaneously. The intramural hematoma is thought to have developed from a microdissection of the esophageal wall in the presence of a hemorrhagic diathesis.
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keywords = esophagus
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4/41. Esophageal tubular duplication complicated with intraluminal hematoma: a case report.

    Esophageal tubular duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. We experienced a patient with esophageal tubular duplication who presented with a swallowing difficulty which was aggravated after a gastrofiberscopic examination. Preoperative diagnosis was intramural hematoma of the esophagus due to trauma caused by endoscopy. Surgical specimen revealed that hematoma was located within a duplicated lumen of the esophagus. The radiologic and endoscopic findings are discussed in correlation with its pathology.
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keywords = esophagus
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5/41. Endoscopic and radiological features of intramural esophageal dissection.

    A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of chest pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia after an upper respiratory tract infection and nasogastric tube insertion. An upper endoscopy showed a large submucosal bulge along the posterior wall from the upper esophagus with mucosal tears and bridge formation, extending down to the lower esophagus. A barium esophagogram revealed a "double-barreled" esophagus, and chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed eccentric thickening of the esophageal wall. The diagnosis of intramural esophageal dissection (IED) was made and the patient was managed conservatively with nothing by mouth and intravenous hydration. The clinical course was uneventful; the patient was discharged later and up to the time of writing has been completely asymptomatic, with normal swallowing function.
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keywords = esophagus
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6/41. Two cases of submucosal haematoma of the oesophagus and Mallory-Weiss tear.

    Submucosal haematoma of the oesophagus is an uncommon condition which may be under-recognised. Presentation may be with chest pain, dysphagia or haematemesis. endoscopy, CT scan, barium meal or a combination of these modalities makes the diagnosis. Most patients make a full recovery.
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keywords = esophagus
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7/41. Retroesophageal hematoma caused by fish bone perforation of the esophagus.

    A 39-year-old man complained of acute dysphagia and dorsal pain while eating fish. Radiologic and endoscopic studies revealed a retroesophageal mass, which was later shown to be a hematoma.
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8/41. Esophageal obstruction due to intermuscular hematoma following pneumatic dilatation.

    A case of incomplete esophageal perforation with an intermuscular hematoma is presented. Unlike previously described submucosal or intramural perforations, this case involved mucosa, submucosa, and the inner circular muscle layer but was limited by the outer longitudinal layer. Nonsurgical treatment was followed when the clinical picture of an incomplete perforation without mediastinal soilage was considered. Surgery was done when evidence of impending extension of the process outside the esophagus developed.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = esophagus
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9/41. Penetrating aortic atherosclerotic ulcer complicated by periesophageal hematoma.

    Penetrating aortic atherosclerotic ulcers have been recently recognized as an entity among the acute aortic syndromes with a potentially fatal outcome. We describe the case of a patient presenting with severe chest pain who died as a result of a thoracic-aorta penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer complicated by a intramural hematoma of the esophagus and stomach, leading to exsanguination. To our knowledge this is the first case reported in the literature of such a complication from penetrating aortic atherosclerotic ulcers.
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keywords = esophagus
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10/41. Spontaneous retropharyngeal hematoma of a parathyroid cyst: report of a case.

    A 41-year-old woman presented with severe and sudden anterior neck swelling, pain, and dysphagia. Computed tomography (CT) scan and ultrasound of the neck showed a giant mass in the retropharyngeal space, displacing the trachea and esophagus anteriorly. Aspiration cytology was done, following which extensive cervical and chest ecchymosis occurred and her symptoms immediately improved. A repeat CT scan demonstrated that the cervical giant mass had vanished, but there was a residual mass in the left paratracheal space. Exploratory surgery of the neck revealed a parathyroid cyst with severe adhesion to the surrounding tissues. We considered that a ruptured parathyroid cyst had induced massive hemorrhage into the cervical tissues and mediastinum, but that the hemorrhage had been absorbed. Extracapsular hemorrhage from a parathyroid adenoma or cyst is rare, especially from a parathyroid cyst. In fact, to our knowledge, this represents only the third case of symptomatic spontaneous bleeding of a parathyroid cyst. Nevertheless, this entity should still be considered in the differential diagnosis of all rapidly progressing retropharyngeal masses.
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keywords = esophagus
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