Cases reported "Hematoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/119. Multiple postoperative intracerebral haematomas remote from the site of craniotomy.

    A postoperative haemorrhage is a common and serious complication of a neurosurgical procedure. It usually occurs at the site of the surgery, but on occasion a postoperative haematoma is found at a distance from the previous craniotomy. Multiple postoperative haemorrhages are extremely rare. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, operated on for the removal of a supratentorial astrocytoma, who developed in the early post-operative period multiple bilateral intracerebral haematomas without involvement of the surgical bed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/119. Spontaneous subcapsular renal haemorrhage presenting with pleuritic chest pain.

    We present an unusual case of spontaneous renal subcapsular haematoma in a normal kidney presenting with pleuritic chest pain and mimicking pulmonary embolism. The literature suggests that the majority of these cases occur in association with renal tumours and that the diagnosis can best be made by computed tomographic scanning. Treatment is expectant but because of the high incidence of tumours, nephrectomy is usually necessary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/119. Clinical efficacy and recovery levels of recombinant FVIIa (NovoSeven) in the treatment of intracranial haemorrhage in severe neonatal FVII deficiency.

    The use of replacement FVII is critical to the successful treatment of life-threatening bleeds in newborns and infants with severe FVII deficiency (<1%). However, the clinical efficacy, optimum dosage and pharmacologic recovery of rFVIIa in such children has not been studied systematically. This report is a case of an infant with severe FVII deficiency (FVII:C at 0%) and massive intracranial haemorrhage in which successful use of rFVIIa (NovoSeven) was carefully monitored. The drug was administered by intravenous bolus through a central line every 4 h at each of three dose levels: 15 microg kg-1, 22 microg kg-1 and 30 microg kg-1. FVII:C was >100% between 30 and 180 min after each infusion with mean trough levels above 25% for all three dose levels. There was no evidence of hyper-coagulation as indicated by measurements of the platelet count, D-dimer, plasma protamine paracoagulant and fibrinogen levels in spite of high FVII:C concentration. In this infant, rFVIIa was well-tolerated, maintained effective haemostasis with good clinical outcome, and produced consistent therapeutic mean trough levels above 25% FVII:C even at 15 microg kg-1 every 4 h.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/119. meningioma manifesting intracerebral haemorrhage: a possible mechanism of haemorrhage.

    We present a possible mechanism of intracerebral peritumoural haemorrhage in meningioma based on the clinical data of three of our cases. A meningioma manifesting intracerebral haemorrhage is uncommon and some sporadic case reports have been presented, but without any proven mechanisms. We are presenting three cases of convexity meningioma manifesting spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage with apoplectiform onset. All three patients had no evidence of bleeding tendency or other predisposing factors for haemorrhage. Preoperative radiological studies showed a solid mass attached to the dura with intracerebral peritumoural haematoma. Total removal of the tumour and haematoma could be achieved in every case. Histological investigation revealed extensive tumour infarction in two cases and fibrosis related to pre-existing ischaemia in the other case. The diagnoses were atypical meningioma in two cases and transitional type in one case. We suggest that extensive tumour infarction might be a cause of spontaneous intracerebral peritumoural haemorrhage in our series of patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/119. Haemorrhagic lumbar synovial cyst. A cause of acute radiculopathy.

    A total of 254 cases of synovial cysts of the spine have been reported in the English literature, but only eight have been associated with haemorrhage. We describe a 55-year-old man with acute radiculopathy resulting from haemorrhage involving a synovial cyst at a lumbar facet joint. Traumatic factors could have caused bleeding around or into the synovial cyst. Treatment by resection of the cyst and evacuation of the haematoma led to complete neurological recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/119. Posterior-fossa haemorrhage after supratentorial surgery--report of three cases and review of the literature.

    We present clinical details of three patients with posterior fossa haemorrhage after supratentorial surgery and discuss possible pathomechanisms of this rare complication. All patients were males of advanced age. Two patients presented with a history of hypertension. In all patients the occurrence of haemorrhage was associated with loss/removal of large amounts of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) either intra-operatively (one patient undergoing aneurysm surgery) or postoperatively (all three patients: drainage of subdural hygromas or chronic subdural haematomas in two, external ventricular drainage in one patient). Treatment consisted in haematoma evacuation and/or external ventricular drainage. Two patients died, one patient recovered completely. Although haematomas distant from a craniotomy site are a well known entity, a review of the literature identified only 25 published cases of posterior fossa haemorrhage after supratentorial procedures in the CT era. Most often disturbances of coagulation, positioning of the patient and episodes of hypertension have been associated with this complication. Only one author described the occurrence of a haemorrhage after drainage of a supratentorial hygroma. We suggest that the loss of large amounts of CSF intra-operatively and post-operatively may lead to parenchymal shifts or a critical increase of transmural venous pressure with subsequent vascular disruption and haemorrhage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/119. Giant cephalhaematoma in a 17-year-old boy with ehlers-danlos syndrome.

    We report a case of giant cephalhaematoma in a 17-year-old boy with ehlers-danlos syndrome. This haematoma occurred after a minor head injury. It increased in size, immediately after needle aspiration and was responsible for considerable blood loss. Possible physiopathological mechanisms and treatment modalities are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.093418024937755
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/119. wiskott-aldrich syndrome: life-threatening haemorrhage from aneurysms within the liver, small bowel mesentery and kidney, requiring both surgical and radiological intervention.

    wiskott-aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare, generally X-linked recessive condition, originally described by Wiskott in 1937 as a triad of discharging ears, eczema and thrombocytopoenia. Aldrich included bloody diarrhoea in his report of 1954, with severe immunodeficiency and predisposition to malignancy being recognised subsequently. The incidence currently quoted is approximately 4 per million live male births, although there is some regional variation. We report the case of a long-term survivor who had massive haemorrhage from an intrahepatic aneurysm and, on a separate occasion, the right kidney.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/119. Recombinant VIIa concentrate in the management of bleeding following prothrombin complex concentrate-related myocardial infarction in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors.

    prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) and, more recently, activated prothrombin complex concentrates (APCCs), are widely used for the treatment of active bleeding in haemophiliacs with inhibitors. myocardial infarction (MI), associated with the use of these concentrates, is a well-recognized, but uncommon, complication. We review the 14 previous cases published in the literature and describe two additional patients. MI related to the use of activated and non-activated PCCs predominantly affects young patients who often have no preceding history of, or risk factors for, MI and tends to be associated with large cumulative doses of concentrate. The most frequent pathological finding is myocardial haemorrhage, with no evidence of coronary artery atheroma or thrombosis. The management of further bleeding in these patients is difficult. We have safely used recombinant factor viia to treat bleeding in the immediate and long-term period following PCC-related MI.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/119. A renal metastasis from primary peripheral chondrosarcoma presenting as spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma.

    The authors describe a case of renal metastasis from chondrosarcoma originating from the rib, with acute clinical onset characterised by serious anaemia secondary to retroperitoneal perineal haemorrhage. No similar cases have been reported in the literature. The interest of this case lies in both the symptoms of onset and in the metastatic site. From a diagnostic point of view an intraoperative ultrasound scan was useful, revealing the presence of a roundish neoformation, irregularly hypogenic, with a different appearance from anything observed by the authors in the other intraoperative ultrasound examinations of renal masses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hematoma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.