Cases reported "Hematoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/58. Primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty performed for acute myocardial infarction in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    A 72-year-old female with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) complained of severe chest pain. electrocardiography showed ST-segment depression and negative T wave in I, aVL and V4-6. Following a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), urgent coronary angiography revealed 99% organic stenosis with delayed flow in the proximal segment and 50% in the middle segment of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Subsequently, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for the stenosis in the proximal LAD was performed. In the coronary care unit, her blood pressure dropped. Hematomas around the puncture sites were observed and the platelet count was 28,000/mm3. After transfusion, electrocardiography revealed ST-segment elevation in I, aVL and V1-6. Urgent recatheterization disclosed total occlusion in the middle segment of the LAD. Subsequently, PTCA was performed successfully. Then, intravenous immunoglobulin increased the platelet count and the bleeding tendency disappeared. A case of AMI with ITP is rare. The present case suggests that primary PTCA can be a useful therapeutic strategy, but careful attention must be paid to hemostasis and to managing the platelet count.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/58. Complications of lumbar puncture with injection of hydrosoluble material.

    We report two cases of severe disorders after spinal puncture with injection of hydrosoluble material. The first case concerned a 36-year-old woman with intrathecal injection of 125 ml of hydrocortisone acetate. An intracranial occipital hematoma developed. The second case concerned a 26-year-old man with intrathecal injection of contrast media and hydrocortisone. A chemical meningitis occurred. In both cases the natural course was favorable. Both complications are well known but rare. A review of the literature is made with description of the mechanisms. Preventive therapeutic measures are reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/58. Extradural haematoma complicating lumbar puncture following a craniotomy. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: This case report illustrates the development of an intracranial extradural haematoma (EDH) as an uncommon complication of a lumbar puncture. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 10-year-old girl operated for intra-third ventricular cysticercosis developed postlumbar puncture headache after a drainage lumbar puncture (LP) on the 7th postoperative day. CT scan revealed a right frontal EDH away from the operative site. INTERVENTION: The child was managed conservatively in view of her preserved sensorium. RESULTS: The child had an uneventful recovery. Follow-up CT scans showed resolution of the haematoma. CONCLUSIONS: LP, though considered to be a safe procedure, may rarely be associated with a potentially lethal intracranial haematoma, which can be managed successfully if diagnosed at an early stage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/58. Sequential retroperitoneal venous hemorrhage and embolism of an angio-seal puncture closure device complicating iliac artery angioplasty.

    PURPOSE: To present a case of iatrogenic puncture closure device embolization complicating surgery for retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RPH) secondary to angioplasty-induced common iliac vein trauma. methods AND RESULTS: A 78-year-old woman with rest pain underwent successful kissing balloon dilation of her aortoiliac bifurcation for a calcified ostial stenosis of the left common iliac artery. Hemostatic puncture closure devices (Angio-Seal) were used to secure both femoral punctures. A right-sided retroperitoneal hematoma developed, and during surgical exploration of the right groin, the Angio-Seal device was removed. The only bleeding site found was the external iliac artery puncture and it was repaired. She again became hypovolemic 18 hours later and was returned to surgery, where bilateral groin explorations and laparotomy by the vascular surgical team found a tear in the left common iliac vein. After repair, the patient was stable for 48 hours when the left leg became critically ischemic. Angiography detected a new high-grade stenosis in the left profunda femoris artery; embolectomy retrieved a footplate from the left puncture closure device. The patient died 11 days later from multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS: RPH should be considered early as an occult cause of hypovolemic shock developing soon after even technically straightforward iliac angioplasty. Interventionists should be aware that using the Angio-Seal device risks acute limb ischemia if footplate embolization occurs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 9
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/58. enoxaparin associated with hugh abdominal wall hematomas: a report of two cases.

    enoxaparin is a low-molecular-weight heparin used for prophylaxis against deep venous thrombosis. Indications include hip and knee replacement surgery, risk of deep venous thrombosis during abdominal surgery, and prevention of ischemic complications of unstable angina and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction. Its efficacy in the prevention of the above complications has been previously studied; however, the liberal use of enoxaparin is not without incident. Complications of enoxaparin include hemorrhage, thrombocytopenia, and local reactions. Since 1993 there have been more than 40 reports of epidural or spinal hematoma formation with the concurrent use of enoxaparin and spinal/epidural anesthesia or spinal puncture. Herein reported are two cases of abdominal wall hematomas in patients receiving prophylaxis with enoxaparin. Both patients sustained an unexplained fall in the hematocrit and abdominal pain. A CT scan confirmed the diagnosis. One patient recovered uneventfully; however, the other patient, on chronic hemodialysis, became hemodynamically unstable and hyperkalemic and sustained a fatal cardiac arrhythmia. An extensive review of the literature revealed no similar cases of abdominal wall hematomas associated with enoxaparin although other complications, including spinal and epidural hematomas, psoas hematomas, and skin necrosis have been reported. The extended use of enoxaparin as an anticoagulant requires the physician to be vigilant of these rare complications. Bleeding can occur at any site during therapy with enoxaparin. An unexplained fall in the hematocrit or blood pressure should lead to a search for a bleeding site.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/58. liver hematoma following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

    We report the case of an 81-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for choledocholithiasis. A diagnosis of infected hematoma was made. A CT-guided puncture produced bloody matter that grew citrobacter freundii. A catheter was left in place for 3 weeks before the patient could be discharged from hospital. We hypothesize that the hepatic parenchyma had been torn by the guide used during the ERCP. This case represents the first report of this type of iatrogenic injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/58. Reversed portal vein pulsatility on Doppler ultrasound secondary to an iatrogenic mediastinal haematoma.

    The Doppler ultrasound pattern of reversed pulsatile flow (RPF) of the portal vein (PV) is strongly associated with high atrial pressure. Tricuspid regurgitation is considered to be the main cause of RPF in patients with chronic heart disease, but the precise pathomechanism of this PV flow pattern has not yet been resolved. We describe for the first time a RPF of the PV in a young patient with a mediastinal haematoma after inadvertent puncture of the subclavian artery. In this patient, transcutaneous echocardiography demonstrated normal valves without any tricuspid regurgitation as well as normal diameters of the cardiac cavities. The RPF of the PV in this patient resolved spontaneously within 7 days. An increased hepatic outflow resistance with transmission of hepatic artery pulsations across arterioportal communications seems the most likely pathomechanism to explain our finding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/58. Multiple persistent circumscribed pulmonary hematomas due to a blunt chest trauma.

    A case of multiple sharply circumscribed pulmonary hematomas ("coin" lesions) following blunt, non-penetrating thoracic trauma, is reported. The finding mimicked cancerous "cannon ball" metastatic deposits. A computed tomographic scan combined with puncture biopsy provided the correct diagnosis. Spontaneous complete resolution of the hematomas took 3 years.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/58. Needling renal cysts and tumours: cytology and radiology.

    Renal masses found by intravenous urography, ultra-sound scanning, and arteriography were needled in 102 patients. Simple renal cysts containing clear fluid and no cytological abnormalities were found in 85 patients. Two unsuspected renal cell carcinomas were found on puncture; cytological examination showed malignant cells in the aspirate. Another five renal tumours were needled deliberately before nephrectomy, and a firm preoperative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma was made on aspiration cytology in three. Benign cysts which had bled were particularly hard to diagnose. With care, radiology and cytology in combination can provide the firm diagnostic base needed for sound clinical management. The radiology-cytology team must be alert to the unusual finding that indicates a complex lesion, such as an unsuspected renal tumour.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/58. Tight Sylvian cisterns associated with hyperdense areas mimicking subarachnoid hemorrhage on computed tomography--four case reports.

    Four patients with supratentorial mass lesions (two chronic subdural hematomas, one acute epidural hematoma, and one acute subdural hematoma) showed hyperdense sylvian cisterns on computed tomography (CT). association of subarachnoid hemorrhage was suspected initially, but was excluded by intraoperative observation or postoperative lumbar puncture. CT showed disappearance of the hyperdense areas just after evacuation of the mass lesions. The hyperdense areas are probably a result of the partial volume phenomenon or concentrations of calcium deposits rather than abnormally high hematocrit levels, which were not found in these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hematoma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.