Cases reported "Hematoma"

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1/126. An infantile intraosseous hematoma of the skull. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    An infantile intraosseous hematoma of the right parietal bone is presented. This lesion appeared after birth trauma and persisted without any enlargement. It was diagnosed on the 25th day of life and the baby boy was operated on 2 weeks later. The clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological characteristics of this lesion are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = skull
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2/126. Clinical picture and management of subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit.

    A subperiosteal hematoma was seen in a 14-year-old boy following a blow to his head during a car accident. The involved orbit exhibited exophthalmus and inability of the eye to move above the horizontal. x-rays revealed a hairline fracture of the skull and a hemotympanum was found on the injured side. A subperiosteal hematoma of the orbital roof was suspected. Needle aspiration of the blood from the orbital hematoma resulted in an almost immediate cure of all orbital and occular problems.
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ranking = 3.2992741787136
keywords = fracture, skull
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3/126. Growing skull fracture of the orbital roof. Case report.

    Growing skull fractures are rare complications of head trauma and very rarely arise in the skull base. The clinical and radiological finding and treatment of a growing fracture of the orbital roof in a 5-year-old boy are reported, and the relevant literature is reviewed. The clinical picture was eyelid swelling. Computed tomography (CT) scan was excellent for demonstrating the bony defect in the orbital roof. Frontobasal brain injury seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the fracture growth. Growing skull fracture of the orbital roof should be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of persistent ocular symptoms. craniotomy with excision of gliotic brain and granulation tissue, dural repair and cranioplasty is the treatment of choice.
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ranking = 142.32445747129
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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4/126. Acute traumatic dissection and blunt rupture of the thoracic descending aorta: A case report.

    Rupture of the thoracic aorta following blunt trauma is increasing in incidence and remains a highly lethal injury. Blunt traumatic rupture and acute dissection of the thoracic aorta is very rare. A 50-year-old man involved in a motor vehicle accident on March 3, 1998 was admitted to our hospital one and a half hours following the accident. On admission, he was alert and his hemodynamics were stable. Chest roentgenogram demonstrated a widened mediastinum and multiple left-sided rib fractures. Enhanced chest CT revealed a periaortic hematoma just distal to the isthmus, dissection of the descending thoracic aorta and mediastinal hematoma. With the diagnosis of thoracic aortic rupture and acute DeBakey type IIIB dissection, an emergency operation was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram showed a mobile intimal flap and diminished caliber of the proximal descending aorta. Disruption and dissection of the descending thoracic aorta were found. Prosthetic graft interposition was accomplished with the aid of left atrium-left femoral artery bypass using a centrifugal pump and heparin-coated circuits and a blood collection device for blood conservation. The weak dissected aortic wall was glued and reapproximated with Gelatine-Resorcine-Formol glue. The postoperative course was uneventful.
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ranking = 3.0492741787136
keywords = fracture
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5/126. Seat-belt transection of the pararenal vena cava in a 5-year-old child: survival with caval ligation.

    Blunt traumatic disruption of the inferior vena cava is associated with high mortality and is rare in children. A seat-belted 5-year-old girl sustained, in a motor vehicle accident, pararenal caval transection, right renal vein transection, laceration of the right kidney, duodenal injury, and a second lumbar vertebral fracture. Damage-control surgery consisted of inferior vena caval and right renal vein ligation and temporary abdominal wall silo closure. She is alive and well 10 months after the accident, with no sequelae of caval ligation and with normal right renal function.
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ranking = 3.0492741787136
keywords = fracture
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6/126. Bilateral frontal extradural haematomas caused by rupture of the superior sagittal sinus: case report.

    A 26-year-old male sustained simultaneous massive bilateral frontal extradural haematomas following a head injury as a result of a large tear of the superior sagittal sinus, without fracturing of the skull vault.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = skull
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7/126. Delayed presentation of abdominal bleeding in a teenage boy after a fall.

    The delayed presentation of an abdominal bleed in a victim of a fall is a rare occurrence. In the multiple injured patients, even with an intact sensorium, competing pain from associated injuries may mask the pain from a occult injury. Although a rare occurrence of abdominal injury in an asymptomatic neurologically intact patient, in the patient requiring a computed tomography scan of a spinal fracture, it may be worthwhile to image the abdomen and pelvis as well to rule out a concomitant occult abdominal injury. Current literature regarding injuries associated with falls from height are discussed that support this position and the delayed manifestation of an abdominal bleed in a 17-year-old boy 1 day after a fall is presented.
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ranking = 3.0492741787136
keywords = fracture
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8/126. Intraosseous hematoma in a newborn with factor viii deficiency.

    We present an unusual case of an intraosseous hematoma in a newborn with a known bleeding disorder. This cephalohematoma was diagnosed shortly after birth, was entirely within the bony skull, and was in fact determined to be an intraosseous hematoma. The initial CT scans showed the unusual appearance and location of the lesion; later scans showed a significant amount of remodeling, with resolution of the hematoma. Although the coagulopathic diagnosis was independent of this finding, a bleeding disorder might be considered in other patients with similar CT findings.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = skull
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9/126. Infected cephalohematoma associated with sepsis and skull osteomyelitis: report of one case.

    osteomyelitis is rarely complicated by an infected cephalohematoma. We report a case of an infected cephalohematoma associated with escherichia coli sepsis and osteomyelitis of the skull. This 37-day-old boy had E. coli sepsis, which had a poor response to antibiotic treatment. An infected cephalohematoma was found when he was 43 days old. Cranial computed tomography (CT) scanning showed cephalohematoma with abscess formation and underlying bony destruction over the left parietal region. Antibiotics alone could not eradicate the infection. Extensive incision, drainage, and debridement of the necrotic bone resulted in prompt improvement. Three weeks of ceftizoxime administered intravenously, followed by 3 weeks of cefixime given orally completed the treatment course.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = skull
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10/126. Selective transvenous liquid embolization of a Type 1 dural arteriovenous fistula at the junction of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. Case report.

    The authors describe the case of a 51-year-old man with a Type 1 dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) located at the junction of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. The dural AVF developed after the patient underwent a craniotomy for an acute extradural hematoma. The patient suffered pulsatile tinnitus 3 months after surgery. After several attempts at transarterial embolization (TAE), the venous channel located close to the skull fracture was accessed via a transfemoral-transvenous approach and was embolized by administering a liquid nonadhesive agent. Successful embolization of the dural AVF was achieved both clinically and radiologically without causing considerable hemodynamic alterations. This procedure, either alone or combined with TAE, would seem to be an alternative treatment for dural AVFs in this location, without causing compromise of flow within the affected sinuses, when selective venous access is available.
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ranking = 22.662651518977
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
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