Cases reported "Hematoma"

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1/151. Dural arteriovenous malformation in the anterior cranial fossa.

    Two cases of dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM) at the base of the anterior cranial fossa are described. In both cases an intracerebral hematoma following the rupture of the AVM was the first indication of the disease. In one case, the malformation was supplied both by the anterior ethmoidal artery and frontopolar artery draining into the superior sagittal sinus. In the second case, the right anterior ethmoidal artery with draining veins into the superior sagittal sinus and sphenoparietal sinus was the feeding vessel. Surgical evacuation of the hematoma and excision of the malformation was performed on both patients. The typical clinical signs and radiological findings are described. A review of the pertinent literature is given.
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2/151. Two faces of orbital hematoma in intranasal (endoscopic) sinus surgery.

    Orbital hematoma and blindness can occur during or after sinus surgery. All orbital hematomas in 3500 endoscopic sinus ethmoidectomies were identified and evaluated for type, treatment, and sequelae. Fifteen orbital hematomas were identified, with 1 case of temporary blindness and no cases of permanent blindness. Two types of orbital hematoma were identified-slow (venous) and fast (arterial)-which differ in management. The venous type results from penetration of the lamina papyracea and disruption of veins. The arterial hematoma is caused by anterior or posterior ethmoid artery injury. The treatment approach to each is different, with blindness more likely occurring from a fast (arterial) hematoma. Of the 2 types of orbital hematoma that can occur during sinus surgery, surgical decompression and hemorrhage control are more likely with the fast arterial hematoma, which has not been the subject of any prior presentation. Cause and management of each will be discussed.
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3/151. Endovascular management of axillary artery trauma.

    A 17-year-old man was seen with an expanding false aneurysm of the right axillary artery. This was treated by an intraluminal covered-stent introduced through the brachial artery via an 11F sheath. The covered-stent was constructed from a segment of great saphenous vein anchored in the axillary artery by a 29 mm Palmaz stent. Postoperative arteriography and duplex scanning confirmed normal flow through the axillary artery with complete exclusion of the aneurysm. Postoperative recovery was uneventful.
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keywords = vein
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4/151. life-threatening airway obstruction caused by a retropharyngeal haematoma.

    We present the case of a 68-year-old woman who had a large cervicomediastinal haematoma that caused life-threatening airway obstruction. Retropharyngeal haematoma may occur in any age group and following a variety of causes. Retropharyngeal haematomas must be considered as a cause of airway obstruction following common injuries such as blunt cervical trauma or internal jugular vein cannulation. A high index of suspicion and early lateral neck X-ray is essential for safe management of this rare but potentially life-threatening injury.
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keywords = vein
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5/151. Seat-belt transection of the pararenal vena cava in a 5-year-old child: survival with caval ligation.

    Blunt traumatic disruption of the inferior vena cava is associated with high mortality and is rare in children. A seat-belted 5-year-old girl sustained, in a motor vehicle accident, pararenal caval transection, right renal vein transection, laceration of the right kidney, duodenal injury, and a second lumbar vertebral fracture. Damage-control surgery consisted of inferior vena caval and right renal vein ligation and temporary abdominal wall silo closure. She is alive and well 10 months after the accident, with no sequelae of caval ligation and with normal right renal function.
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ranking = 2
keywords = vein
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6/151. Sequential retroperitoneal venous hemorrhage and embolism of an angio-seal puncture closure device complicating iliac artery angioplasty.

    PURPOSE: To present a case of iatrogenic puncture closure device embolization complicating surgery for retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RPH) secondary to angioplasty-induced common iliac vein trauma. methods AND RESULTS: A 78-year-old woman with rest pain underwent successful kissing balloon dilation of her aortoiliac bifurcation for a calcified ostial stenosis of the left common iliac artery. Hemostatic puncture closure devices (Angio-Seal) were used to secure both femoral punctures. A right-sided retroperitoneal hematoma developed, and during surgical exploration of the right groin, the Angio-Seal device was removed. The only bleeding site found was the external iliac artery puncture and it was repaired. She again became hypovolemic 18 hours later and was returned to surgery, where bilateral groin explorations and laparotomy by the vascular surgical team found a tear in the left common iliac vein. After repair, the patient was stable for 48 hours when the left leg became critically ischemic. angiography detected a new high-grade stenosis in the left profunda femoris artery; embolectomy retrieved a footplate from the left puncture closure device. The patient died 11 days later from multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS: RPH should be considered early as an occult cause of hypovolemic shock developing soon after even technically straightforward iliac angioplasty. Interventionists should be aware that using the Angio-Seal device risks acute limb ischemia if footplate embolization occurs.
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ranking = 2
keywords = vein
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7/151. Hepatic subcapsular hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones.

    We present a patient with complication of huge hepatic subcapsular hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic lithotripsy. The hematoma measured 78-110mm. angiography showed a subcapsular hematoma, rather than a hematoma in the liver. In the arterial phase, the distal end of the small vessel showed spotty opacification similar to microaneurysma, suggesting that it was an injury caused by separation of the liver and its capsule, caused by the shock waves. The portal vein and hepatic vein were normal. After 8 weeks of conservative therapy, the hematoma was gradually absorbed and the patient was discharged. Eight months after the accident, the hematoma had decreased to 40mm in size. After 20 months, it was completely absorbed. The reported rate of renal subcapsular hematoma after ESWL for renal or ureter stones is 0.1%-0.7%. To date, however, only five cases of hepatic subcapsular hematoma after right renal stone disintegration have been reported. This is the first report of hepatic subcapsular hematoma after ESWL for pancreatic stones.
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8/151. Computerized tomography: abnormal intracerebral collections of blood in children.

    Three children with unusual abnormal intracerebral collections of blood were examined by computerized tomography. These cases demonstrate the complementary relationship of this technique with other neuroradiological diagnostic methods. An intracerebral aneurysm and an arteriovenous malformation of the vein of Galen are demonstrated on computerized tomograms.
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keywords = vein
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9/151. hemobilia, intrahepatic hematoma and acute thrombosis with cavernomatous transformation of the portal vein after percutaneous thermoablation of a liver metastasis.

    A 53-year-old-man underwent US-guided percutaneous thermal ablation with a cooled-tip needle of three liver metastases from gastric cancer. Six days later, the patient was re-admitted for melena, scleral jaundice, and anemia. Abdominal US disclosed echogenic material in the gallbladder lumen (hemobilia) and a focal lesion with mixed echotexture in segment III (hepatic hematoma). On day 5 portal cavernomatosis was diagnosed at US and confirmed by color Doppler and a helical CT exam. The case described emphasizes that radio-frequency interstitial hyperthermia may cause not only traumatic injury of the liver parenchyma but also thermally mediated damage of vascular structures.
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ranking = 54.230606634889
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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10/151. Computed tomography (CT) findings of gastric rupture after blunt trauma.

    A 49-year-old carpenter was hit by timber around his upper abdomen 1 hour after breakfast. Immediate computed tomography was taken, followed by emergency laparotomy showing gastric rupture accompanied with hemorrhage from the superior mesenteric vein. hemostasis and distal partial gastrectomy followed by Billroth-I anastomosis reconstruction was performed. Here, we report the abdominal computed tomography findings from a patient with gastric rupture after blunt trauma. The present case, which is only the second such case reported in English literature, suggested that computed tomography is useful for assessing associated injuries in gastric rupture patients, for detecting intraperitoneal free air which can be missed by x-rays, and for locating the laceration of the rupture.
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keywords = vein
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