Cases reported "Hemiplegia"

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11/86. Wide clinical variability in a family with a CACNA1A T666m mutation: hemiplegic migraine, coma, and progressive ataxia.

    We report a Japanese family carrying a T666M missense mutation of CACNA1A. Affected members demonstrated a strikingly wide clinical spectrum including migraine, hemiplegia, coma, and progressive cerebellar ataxia. Despite such variability of the clinical features, they demonstrated similar magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrating cerebellar atrophy predominantly of the cerebellar vermis. These magnetic resonance images appeared not to correlate with clinical severity. Our findings should indicate that a T666M mutation of CACNA1A may be associated with more variable clinical features and that paroxysmal hemiplegic migraine attacks and progressive cerebellar atrophy should have distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = migraine
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12/86. Hemiplegic migraine with prolonged symptoms: case report.

    Hemiplegic migraine is defined by the occurrence of migraine during attacks of unilateral weakness. Neurologic symptoms last for 15 to 60 minutes in most cases. Attacks usually start in childhood, adolescence, or early adulthood. diagnosis may be delayed if there is no relevant family history. A 16-year-old girl who was diagnosed with hemiplegic migraine presenting with prolonged left hemiparesis is reported. The importance of this case is that the pediatrician will also consider migraine in the differential diagnosis of a child presenting with hemiparesis even if there is no previous headache and family history.
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ranking = 1.3364477721878
keywords = migraine, headache
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13/86. basilar artery migraine in young children.

    Eight children with recurrent attacks of neurologic dysfunction referable to the brainstem and cerebellum are reported. The episodes occur suddenly, clear completely, and leave the patient without residua. The most frequent signs are ataxia, alternating hemipareses, and vertigo. The majority of patients are girls, and most have the onset of the condition prior to the age of 4 years. Headache was definitely present in three children, and possibly present in four. A striking history of migraine was found in seven families, accounting for 16 affected relatives. Fifteen of these were female and 14 were on the maternal side. Follow-up of the children has not provided any evidence for progressive neurologic disease. The patient followed for the longest period of time has developed classic migraine.
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ranking = 1
keywords = migraine
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14/86. Hemiplegic cluster.

    We report four cases of a new variant of cluster headache associated with hemiparesis. Clinical similarities with hemiplegic migraine suggest that hemiplegic cluster, too, may be a channelopathy. One of our patients had a family history suggestive of an autosomal dominant inheritance.
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ranking = 0.16978110552114
keywords = migraine, headache
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15/86. Multimodal functional imaging of prolonged neurological deficits in a patient suffering from familial hemiplegic migraine.

    The case of a patient with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) suffering from prolonged right sided hemiparesis and aphasia that persisted for more than 10 days is reported. The symptoms were accompanied by slowing of the magnetoencephalogram over the left hemisphere, which normalized parallel to the clinical improvement. Positron emission tomography obtained on the 6th day revealed glucose-hypometabolism (hemispheric difference > or =10%) in left hemisphere's fronto-basal cortex, caudate nucleus, and thalamus. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging including perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging was normal and did not show significant alterations of cortical perfusion or water mobility during the episode. We hypothesize that this finding provides evidence for a primary neuronal dysfunction causing the prolonged neurological deficits in FHM.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = migraine
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16/86. Treatment of sporadic hemiplegic migraine with calcium-channel blocker verapamil.

    Gene mutations within the P/Q type neuronal calcium channel in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) suggest a therapeutic role for calcium-channel blockade. The authors have previously reported abortive therapy of FHM with IV verapamil. Here the authors describe four cases of sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) responsive to verapamil, administered either orally or IV. The findings indicate that verapamil is effective therapy for both SHM and FHM.
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ranking = 1
keywords = migraine
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17/86. Subarachnoid haemorrhage with "Ecstasy" abuse in a young adult.

    Abuse of the drugs like amphetamine, cocaine and "Ecstasy" may be complicated by intracerebral, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Contrary to historical opinion, drug-related intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is frequently related to an underlying vascular malformation. We report the case of an 18-year-old man with a history of Ecstasy abuse preceding the onset of severe occipital headache. Cerebral computed tomography revealed right-sided subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral angiography showed right-sided middle cerebral artery aneurysm of 1 cm diameter. The patient was treated surgically with aneurysm clipping. Three weeks after onset of intracranial haemorrhage, neurological examination demonstrated normal findings. A history of severe headache immediately after using amphetamine, Ecstasy, or cocaine should alert doctors to the possibility of intracerebral haemorrhage. Arteriography should be part of the evaluation of most young patients with stroke or non-traumatic ICH.
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ranking = 0.0062288777089384
keywords = headache
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18/86. Cerebral arterial dolichoectasia with seizure. Case report.

    cerebral angiography, performed after a seizure in a patient with a life-long history of typical hemiplegic migraine, disclosed markedly dolichoectatic anterior and middle cerebral arteries. No abnormality of the adjacent capillary or venous structures was present. A positive brain scan was attributed to ischemia induced by vasospasm rather than to the corresponding large tortuous anterior and middle cerebral arteries. There were no permanent sequelae and the patient has been free of seizures on Dilantin and phenobarbital over a 3-year follow-up period. Angiographic demonstration or description of a similar ectatic set of anterior and middle cerebral arteries could not be found in the literature. The concurrence of seizures and hemiplegic migraine adds to the peculiarity of this case.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = migraine
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19/86. A case of hemeplegic migraine with leptomeningeal angiomatosis.

    A 43 year old man with thirty years history of recurrent hemiplegic migraine, consistently occurring on one side (left sided paresthesia and weakness of less than forty five minutes followed by right sided headache) and lately increasing to once in three days was investigated. CT head and carotid angiogram showed gyral calcification with prominent medullary and subependymal veins confirming the diagnosis of leptomeningeal angiomatosis. Management and followup is discussed.
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ranking = 0.8364477721878
keywords = migraine, headache
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20/86. Ipsilateral hemiplegia in a lateral medullary infarct--Opalski's syndrome.

    A 42-year-old man was admitted complaining of the sudden onset of headache, vomiting, vertigo, and gait disturbance. The authors found hemiparesis of his right limbs, right Homer's syndrome, and decreased pain and temperature sensation of his right face and left limbs. diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed an acute small infarct located on the right side of the lateral lower medulla. This is the first report of Opalski's syndrome with lower medullary infarction detected by DWI.
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ranking = 0.0031144388544692
keywords = headache
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