Cases reported "Hemoperitoneum"

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11/36. Nightmare of lumbar disc surgery: iliac artery injury.

    Intra-operative injuries of pelvic vessels are quite infrequent but serious complications of lumbar disc surgery. Injury may cause laceration of the vessel with acute life threatening retroperitoneal haemorrhage, formation of pseudoaneurysms or arteriovenous fistulae in the late phase. It is important for surgeons to be aware of these potentially fatal complications. Authors reported a case of major vascular injury recognised intra-operatively during posterior lumbar discectomy and repaired immediately.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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12/36. Haemoperitoneum secondary to spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma: CT diagnosis.

    In Western countries, haemoperitoneum following rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unusual. Three patients are presented in whom massive intraperitoneal haemorrhage secondary to spontaneous rupture of HCC was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). CT demonstrated a peripheral hepatic tumour and free intraperitoneal fluid with areas of high-attenuation, representing acute blood-clot, close to the tumour in every case. In our opinion, CT is a valuable imaging modality in the diagnosis of ruptured HCC.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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13/36. Haemoperitoneum due to rupture of an ovarian endometrioid cyst as a first symptom of acute leukaemia.

    We report the case of a 23-year-old woman admitted for a haemoperitoneum secondary to the rupture of an ovarian endometrioid cyst. Preoperative investigations revealed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia of M3 type complicated by severe thrombocytopenia. The patient eventually died of intracerebral haemorrhage. The rarity of acute abdomen by bleeding as the first sign of acute leukaemia is emphasized.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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14/36. A rare cause of intra-abdominal haemorrhage: spontaneous rupture of the splenic vein.

    Spontaneous rupture of the splenic vein is rare, and is associated with high mortality. Few cases have been documented, associated with pregnancy, with hepatic cirrhosis and diseases predisposing to portal hypertension. We report a rare case with no evident symptoms or signs of liver deficiency, which was manifested with sudden massive intraperitoneal haemorrhage. An urgent laparotomy was performed and a tear of the splenic vein which was massively bleeding was found. The patient underwent urgent splenectomy and a biopsy of the liver was taken. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. The histological examination documented the presence of micro-nodular liver cirrhosis. rupture of the splenic vein is a rare condition, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intra-abdominal haemorrhage in a cirrhotic patient and in pregnant women. Control of haemorrhage and ligation of the splenic vein with urgent splenectomy is the appropriate treatment.
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ranking = 7
keywords = haemorrhage
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15/36. Massive haemoperitoneum complicating metastasis in the liver.

    The rare phenomenon of gross intra-abdominal bleeding due to hepatic metastasis was seen in a young male who a short time before had undergone orchiectomy because of embryonal cell carcinoma. Following laparotomy, 4 liters of fresh blood were drained from the peritoneal cavity and the left lobe of the liver, containing a single large metastasis, was removed. It is stressed that when no other cause of such haemorrhage can be found in a patient known to have had malignancy, the possibility of bleeding from a metastasis should be considered and appropriate measures taken.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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16/36. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage.

    On the basis of a spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma in a 55-year-old female patient the diagnostic and therapeutical problems of such an emergency situation will be discussed. Due to the high incidence of malignant tumours as the bleeding source, radical surgery becomes the necessary treatment, which may be needlessly burdened by high operative risk in the acute phase. For that reason the mode of treatment chosen in this particular case was immediate embolization subsequent to arteriography along with consecutive extracapsular nephrectomy and removal of the haematoma.
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ranking = 4
keywords = haemorrhage
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17/36. Ruptured aneurysm of the omentum. Case report.

    A 61-year-old man was operated on for a ruptured aneurysm located on the free margin of the omentum. Such patients should have preoperative arteriography as the source of the haemorrhage can be difficult to find at operation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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18/36. Relative bradycardia: a sign of acute intraperitoneal bleeding.

    Acute intraperitoneal bleeding with hypotension may be accompanied by a relatively normal pulse rate instead of the tachycardia usually produced by blood loss. Four cases of intraperitoneal bleeding of diverse, though pelvic, origin, are described. In each patient, symptomatic hypotension occurred with a pulse rate less than 80 per minute, thereby initially confusing the diagnosis of internal bleeding. The hypotension and relative bradycardia responded to atropine followed by fluid replacement. Response to atropine implies that the reflex that produces bradycardia is mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system. It is concluded that relative bradycardia occurring with intraperitoneal haemorrhage may be the cause of both diagnostic difficulty and disproportionately severe hypotension.
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ranking = 1.2880388655306
keywords = haemorrhage, blood loss
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19/36. Scintigraphic detection of hemobilia and hemoperitoneum secondary to rupture of hepatic artery aneurysm.

    hemobilia frequently presents with variable gastrointestinal (GI) tract bleeding, biliary colic, and jaundice and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of obscure blood loss from the GI tract. Reported here is a case of a ruptured hepatic artery aneurysm that was diagnosed using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. Delayed images demonstrated both hemobilia and free intraperitoneal hemorrhage, which were subsequently confirmed by computed tomography and laparotomy. A similar case has not been previously reported in the scintigraphic literature.
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ranking = 0.28803886553059
keywords = blood loss
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20/36. Fatal intraperitoneal haemorrhage of hepatic origin.

    Eight cases of fatal haemoperitoneum due to liver bleeding are reported. Two followed trauma (liver biopsy and cholecystectomy). The remaining six were spontaneous, 5 being due to malignant liver disease. The sixth case due to polycystic liver disease appears to be unique. The aetiology and importance of spontaneous hepatic bleeding is discussed.
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ranking = 4
keywords = haemorrhage
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