Cases reported "Hemoptysis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Pulmonary hydatid cyst as a cause of recurrent haemoptysis and responding to treatment with albendazole.

    A 28 year old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent haemoptysis, fever, and multiple well defined masses on a chest x-ray and subsequently responded to treatment with albendazole is reported. Complete remission of the symptoms and improvement of chest x-ray findings was attained within 2 months of initiation of treatment. The unusual presentation of pulmonary hydatid cyst and the response to pharmacotherapy is briefly reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. hemoptysis secondary to pulmonary pseudoaneurysm 30 years after a gunshot wound.

    A 49-year-old man presented with intermittent hemoptysis from a traumatic pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm 30 years following a thoracic gunshot wound. The patient was asymptomatic for 28.5 years, when he began experiencing recurrent hemoptysis, chest pain, and a cough. A left lower lobe mass on chest x-ray film was investigated with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and pulmonary angiogram confirming a 1.5-cm pseudoaneurysm. Intraluminal coil embolization was attempted, but a left lower lobectomy was ultimately necessary to treat persistent hemoptysis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Just another hemoptysis or a fluke?

    Hemopytsis is commonly encountered in the daily practice of the pulmonary physician. Younger patients with normal chest x-rays frequently have acute or chronic bronchial disease accounting for their complaint. Occasionally parasitic disease is described as an unusual cause for a patient presenting with hemoptysis. Although pulmonary paragonimiasis is unusual in this country, because of the rapid growth in travel as well as immigration, physicians will need to be aware of this disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Endobronchial myofibroblastic sarcoma presenting with hemoptysis in a patient with a normal chest x-ray.

    hemoptysis is an important symptom in clinical practice. The diagnosis of the underlying cause is often difficult, particularly in patients presenting with a normal chest x-ray. We report a case of hemoptysis with a normal chest x-ray due to a rare endobronchial neoplasm: myofibroblastic sarcoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. Acute respiratory distress due to fibrosarcoma of the carina in a child.

    We report a 12-year-old boy with primary bronchopulmonary fibrosarcoma (PBPF). He was misdiagnosed a having asthma until he presented with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Chest x-ray showed atelectasis of the right lung. bronchoscopy performed to rule out foreign body inhalation revealed a friable mass obstructing the right main bronchus. Successful treatment was achieved with surgical resection of the lesion followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Follicular bronchiolitis, an unusual cause of haemoptysis in giant cell arteritis.

    The occurrence of follicular bronchiolitis (FB), lymphoid hyperplasia of the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue, is reported in association with several systemic rheumatic diseases. However, the occurrence of FB in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) is not described. A 64-year-old man with long-standing GCA subsequently presented with haemoptysis. A mass in the lower lobe of the left lung was seen on chest x-ray and computed tomography. A wedge resection was performed, and histological examination revealed bronchiectasis, granulation tissue and hyperplasia of peribronchiolar lymphoid aggregates, consistent with FB. FB should be included in the differential diagnosis of haemoptysis in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. hemoptysis: a manifestation of pulmonary disease confidently managed by military physicians.

    Military physicians can confidently manage hemoptysis with a systematic approach and optimal timing of consultation. Begin with a thorough history, physical examination, and chest x-ray. In our series of 177 cases, a cause for hemoptysis was found in 78% of those with abnormal chest x-rays but in only 21% of those with normal chest x-rays. All 36 cases of bronchogenic carcinoma were associated with an abnormal chest x-ray. A normal chest x-ray was associated with no cause found for the hemoptysis (44 cases) or bronchitis (25 cases), with no carcinomas developing upon a 2-year follow-up. hospitalization is indicated with excessive bleeding or to allay patient or physician) anxiety. Diagnostic bronchoscopy is usually indicated, especially to localize the bleeding in massive hemoptysis (greater than 600 cc per 24 hours) when surgery may be indicated. Prompt referral should be the rule with bleeding from a mycetoma, diffuse bronchiectasis, or with recurrent significant hemorrhage (greater than 200 cc). In an active-duty population, these instances are fortunately rare, and conservative management and elective referral are the norm.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Fatal hemoptysis: aortobronchial fistula as a preventable cause of death.

    hemoptysis as a result of leaking aortic aneurysms occurs rarely and has a high fatality rate. A case of chronic hemoptysis resulting from an aortobronchial fistula in a patient with an aortic prosthesis is reported. hemoptysis, even when chronic, should prompt investigation of the possibility of a leaking graft in patients with prosthetic aortic grafts. Chest x-ray and bronchoscopy usually yield nonspecific findings. aortography may demonstrate an aortic aneurysm and is the preferred diagnostic procedure; however, an aggressive surgical approach is often necessary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Blue bodies in cytology specimens in a case of pulmonary talcosis.

    Unusual extracellular birefringent laminated ovoid structures are seen in bronchial brushing, aspiration, and washing specimens in a 28-year-old woman who had histologic evidence of pulmonary talcosis. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis and microchemical studies have identified them to be calcium carbonate. These structures are known as pulmonary blue bodies and are seen mainly in histologic paraffin sections. Their occurrence in cytologic preparations and association with talcosis have not been reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. Erosion of implantable cardioverter defibrillator patch electrode into airways: an unusual cause of recurrent hemoptysis.

    A 74-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of recurrent hemoptysis. He had implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patch electrodes placed 4 years before. A chest x-ray film showed crinkling of his posteriorly placed ICD patch which also appeared to have separated from his ventricle on a CT scan of the chest. bronchoscopy localized the ICD patch electrode to the lower lobe of the left lung. He underwent a lobectomy and was treated with antibiotics at home. In patients with known ICD implantation, patch erosion into the airways should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent hemoptysis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hemoptysis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.