Cases reported "Hemorrhage"

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1/109. life-threatening bleeding in a case of autoantibody-induced factor vii deficiency.

    A male patient presented with life-threatening bleeding induced by autoantibody-induced factor VII (F.VII) deficiency. This patient had macroscopic hematuria, skin ecchymosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and a neck hematoma that was causing disturbed respiration. He developed acute renal failure and acute hepatic failure, probably due to obstruction of the ureters and the biliary tract, respectively. Although activated partial thromboplastin time was normal, prothrombin time (PT) was remarkably prolonged at 71.8 seconds compared to 14.0 seconds in a normal control. Both the immunoreactive level of F.VII antigen and the F.VII activity of the patient's plasma samples were < 1.0% of normal. Although an equal part of normal plasma was added to the patient's plasma, PT was not corrected. The patient's plasma inhibited F.VII activity. These findings suggested the presence of a plasma inhibitor for F.VII. After administration of large doses of methylprednisolone, PT was gradually shortened and plasma levels of F.VII increased over time. Bleeding, acute renal failure, and acute hepatic failure improved markedly following the steroid treatment. These observations suggest that life-threatening bleeding can be induced by autoantibody-induced F.VII deficiency and that immunosuppressive therapy using large doses of steroid can be successful in inhibiting the production of the autoantibody.
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keywords = obstruction
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2/109. Negative pressure pulmonary hemorrhage.

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema, a well-recognized phenomenon, is the formation of pulmonary edema following an acute upper airway obstruction (UAO). To our knowledge, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage has not been reported previously as a complication of an UAO. We describe a case of negative pressure pulmonary hemorrhage, and we propose that its etiology is stress failure, the mechanical disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane.
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ranking = 10.854153276996
keywords = airway obstruction, obstruction, airway
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3/109. Anesthetic management of a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis.

    A 73-year-old woman who suffered from progressive hoarseness for 6 years and dysphagia without pain for 1 year presented with a soft tissue deposition on the posterior region of the vocal cords and narrowing in the subglottic area. biopsy of this soft tissue and histological examination revealed laryngeal amyloidosis. A tracheostomy and partial removal of the amyloid were performed with general anesthesia. The airway was secured with a smaller diameter endotracheal tube, which was inserted atraumatically with Magill's forceps. The larynx is a rare site for amyloidosis. Laryngeal amyloidosis is fragile and hemorrhagic. Therefore, massive bleeding may occur during intubation. Anesthetists should take care in intubating the tracheas of these patients and be aware of other systemic diseases in laryngeal amyloidosis.
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ranking = 0.82355506434587
keywords = airway
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4/109. Aortopulmonary collateral artery embolization during postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after arterial switch procedure.

    Aortopulmonary collateral arteries sometimes complicate cyanotic congenital heart defects. Combined with a relevant left-right shunt, this could result in massive airway bleeding during and after corrective surgery. A preoperatively diagnosed 1.2 mm small aortopulmonary collateral artery in a newborn suffering from transposition of the great arteries caused life-threatening airway bleeding during surgery. Postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was necessary, and coil embolization was performed on ECMO to terminate pulmonary bleeding.
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ranking = 1.6471101286917
keywords = airway
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5/109. scalp laceration: an obvious 'occult' cause of shock.

    scalp lacerations are often present in patients requiring emergency care for blunt trauma. These injuries are most commonly seen in unrestrained drivers or occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes in which the victim is partially or totally ejected. patients with scalp lacerations often have associated injuries that redirect the clinician's attention to other injury sites. Some scalp lacerations are severe enough to cause hypovolemic shock and acute anemia. If the patient arrives in shock, the perfusion pressure may be low, and there may be minimal active scalp bleeding. Under such circumstances, the scalp wound may be initially dismissed as trivial and attention appropriately turned to assuring an adequate airway, establishing intravenous lines, initiating volume resuscitation, and searching for more "occult" sources of blood loss. However, as the blood pressure returns toward normal, bleeding from the scalp wound becomes more profuse and presents a hemostatic challenge to the clinician. A case presentation illustrates some of these issues and confirms the effectiveness of an often overlooked but simple technique to control scalp hemorrhage--Raney clip application.
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ranking = 0.82355506434587
keywords = airway
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6/109. Waldeyer's ring lymphoma presenting as massive oropharyngeal hemorrhage.

    A case report of a patient presenting with massive oropharyngeal hemorrhage originating from lymphoma of the tonsil and it's management is discussed. Locally advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma may manifest with massive oropharyngeal hemorrhage, however, it is unusual for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma to present in this fashion. Management of oropharyngeal malignancies presenting in this manner includes airway control, control of hemorrhage, and biopsy of the tumor. hemorrhage control is provided by surgical exploration or intraarterial embolization. Extranodal lymphoma of the head and neck is not uncommon and is thoroughly discussed in the medical literature. hemorrhage into the upper aerodigestive tract is occasionally observed in the patient with head and neck cancer. It usually occurs, however, in patients with squamous cell carcinoma that have been previously treated or in patients with locally advanced cancers. A comprehensive review of the literature has revealed no other reports of head and neck lymphoma presenting with massive oropharyngeal hemorrhage.
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ranking = 0.82355506434587
keywords = airway
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7/109. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis complicated by arterio-enteric fistula in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Gastrointestinal mucormycosis is a rare, often fatal, systemic infection found predominantly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of gastrointestinal mucormycosis in a 53-year-old female with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Following her first course of chemotherapy, bowel obstruction developed as a result of mucormycosis. Despite treatment with antifungal therapy, she required a laparotomy owing to severe haemorrhage caused by mucormycosal invasion of her iliac artery. With continued antifungal treatment and further chemotherapy, she ultimately underwent reversal of her Hartmann's procedure and remains disease-free.
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keywords = obstruction
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8/109. pancreatic pseudocyst as a cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and hemobilia. A case report.

    A case of hemobilia from a pancreatic pseudocyst which developed after cholecystostomy and aspiration of the pseudocyst, intended to relieve biliary obstruction, is discussed. These previously reported cases are briefly reviewed.
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keywords = obstruction
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9/109. trachea--innominate artery fistula following tracheostomy. Successful repair using an innominate vein graft.

    This report discusses the first recorded patient in whom a trachea--innominate artery fistula after tracheostomy was treated successfully by resection of the eroded segment of artery followed by graft replacement using the patient's left innominate vein. The mechanism of vessel erosion and its prevention are discussed. Also, suitable methods are presented for obtaining temporary control of the severe hemorrhage associated with a tracheoarterial fistula while simultaneously maintaining an adequate airway.
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ranking = 0.82355506434587
keywords = airway
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10/109. cystectomy for severe hemorrhagic cystitis in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    BACKGROUND: Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). In rare cases, it can be severe, inducing kidney failure and sepsis, and become life-threatening. methods: We report three cases of severe HC in stem cell transplant recipients. risk factors and the management of these patients were studied, as well as severe HC cases reported in the literature. RESULTS: All three patients received high-dose cyclophosphamide in addition to total body irradiation or busulfan in their preparative regimen. They underwent allogeneic SCT, one of them from unrelated cord blood. BK viruria was detected in two cases at the onset of hematuria. HC lasted for more than 3 months, resulting in urinary tract obstruction and sepsis. Ultimately, cystectomy was the last therapeutic procedure available to treat this life-threatening complication. CONCLUSION: We describe three patients, among a total of more than 1300 patients treated in our unit by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, in whom HC was severe and long lasting enough to require cystectomy as a life-saving procedure.
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keywords = obstruction
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