Cases reported "Hemorrhage"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/84. Acute extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient with extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage and review the signs and symptoms of this condition. methods: We report a case of extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and present an overview of previously reported cases. RESULTS: A 48-year-old woman with documented primary hyperparathyroidism, who was awaiting surgical intervention, had acute onset of a neck mass, neck pain, and dysphagia. She was found to have sustained a spontaneous extracapsular hemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma. hypercalcemia persisted, and she subsequently underwent curative parathyroidectomy for the primary hyperparathyroidism. We also identified 15 previously reported cases of extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage and summarized the most common manifestations-most notably, a neck mass or swelling, ecchymoses of the neck and chest, dysphagia, neck pain, hoarseness, and dyspnea. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should be aware of the potential for occurrence of extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. When this condition occurs, severe hypercalcemia or acute hypocalcemia may be present. hypercalcemia is often persistent; however, autoinfarction of the parathyroid adenoma is possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/84. Spontaneous rupture of a parathyroid adenoma presenting as a massive cervical hemorrhage: report of a case.

    We report an unusual case of spontaneous rupture of a parathyroid adenoma causing cervical hemorrhage. A 60-year-old woman presented to our hospital after the sudden development of extensive ecchymosis of her neck and upper anterior chest wall. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed a hematoma in the left retrotracheal space, and laboratory examinations revealed significant hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and a high level of intact parathyroid hormone. Primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed, but it was not until the hematoma had subsided, 4 months after her initial presentation, that a parathyroid adenoma was revealed by CT. An operation was performed, and a parathyroid adenoma with hemosiderin deposition was histologically diagnosed. Although this phenomenon is unusual, all endocrine surgeons should be well aware of the possibility of its occurrence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/84. Spontaneous supraglottic haemorrhage in a patient receiving warfarin sodium treatment.

    A case of spontaneous, isolated supraglottic haemorrhage in a patient recently started with warfarin sodium treatment is described. The symptoms of sore throat, dysphonia, stridor, dysphagia or a neck swelling in a patient taking anticoagulants should alert the clinician to the possibility of this rare but potentially fatal complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/84. Gelastic seizures in clusters in a case of West syndrome after perinatal hypothalamic hemorrhage.

    We describe a 4-month-old Japanese infant with West syndrome with gelastic seizures in clusters. Smile developed around 3 months and gradually increased in frequency and intensity. Positron emission tomography showed hypoperfusion in bilateral hypothalamus. Interictal electroencephalogram (EEG) showed hypsarrythmia. Simultaneous video/EEG monitoring was performed. At first, a smile-like episode developed every several seconds, gradually increased to an abrupt flexion of the neck and extremities, and gradually decreased to a smile-like episode at the end. Ictal EEG revealed desynchronization. ACTH was effective. Smiles are common emotional responses in infancy. However, EEG and neuroimaging should be considered in a case of perinatal asphyxia and delayed development.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/84. Laryngeal crepitus: an aid to diagnosis in non-fatal strangulation.

    Examination of victims exposed to strangulation is well known in clinical forensic medicine. Not all cases show the objective signs to be found at the examination, e.g. petechial haemorrhages in the eyes and face as well as bruises and abrasions on the neck. In cases without objective signs especially, examination of the laryngeal crepitus might be an aid to diagnosis in strangulation. Laryngeal crepitus is felt by the examiner when the larynx is moved from side to side with a slight posterior pressure. When absent, it is a clinical sign of a mass in the retrolaryngeal space or hypopharynx, probably due to a laryngeal trauma. This paper describes three cases of strangulation where the clinical examinations showed a temporary absence of laryngeal crepitus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/84. Internal carotid artery hemorrhage after irradiation and osteoradionecrosis of the skull base.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical presentation and management of internal carotid artery rupture after irradiation and osteoradionecrosis of the skull base. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective review of the patients in an otorhinolaryngology-head and neck secondary and tertiary referral center. METHODOLOGY: From January 1993 to December 1996, patients with hemorrhage from internal carotid artery as a complication of irradiation and osteoradionecrosis of skull base were reviewed and analyzed. RESULTS: Four patients with internal carotid arterial rupture were included in this study. angiography was performed in all cases. Embolization of the aneurysm was performed on 2 patients and the remaining 2 patients underwent occlusion of their internal carotid arteries. Three of the 4 patients did not survive. The fourth is currently alive and well 18 months after embolization of 1 internal carotid artery. CONCLUSION: skull base osteoradionecrosis with bleeding from internal carotid artery is a potentially fatal complication of irradiation. angiography was the mainstay of diagnosis with embolization of the aneurysm and embolization or ligation of the internal carotid artery being the management options. Internal carotid artery occlusion is the definitive treatment provided cross circulation is adequate. SIGNIFICANCE: The advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options are discussed and a management protocol is proposed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/84. Superselective embolization as palliative treatment of recurrent hemorrhage in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck.

    We report a case of recurrent major hemorrhage in a patient with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Before and between the bleeding episodes, the functional level of the patient was remarkably high. Therefore, an attempt at bleeding control with superselective embolization with Ethibloc was made. Because of its specific characteristics, this substance is almost ideal for the purpose of palliative embolization. The material used and the technique of application are described in detail. After the procedure, no hemorrhage occurred for more than 4 months. We recommend superselective embolization, preferably with Ethibloc, for minimally invasive control of recurrent bleeding as palliative treatment in selected patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma, since significant benefit in terms of the quality of life may result.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/84. Anaesthetic management of splenectomy in Evan's syndrome during pregnancy with pregnancy induced hypertension.

    The management of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) during pregnancy, especially with ongoing bleeding diathesis, has not been highlighted sufficiently in the literature. Aortocaval compression and reduction in uteroplacental circulation resulting in foetal hypoxia and acidosis, Mendelson's syndrome due to gravid uterus, trauma to airway with resultant haemorrhage and aspiration into lungs, compromised airway due to short neck, anasarca and heavy breast, limitation in using invasive monitoring and regional anaesthesia and uncontrolled bleeding leading to placental hypoperfusion and foetal hypoxia are some of the important risks. In the present case report, anaesthetic management for splenectomy during pregnancy complicated with pregnancy induced hypertension and bleeding diathesis secondary to ITP is described with reference to above risks.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/84. hemorrhage from a right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: endovascular treatment with a coronary stent-graft.

    PURPOSE: To report a novel case demonstrating the successful endovascular treatment of a right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm using a balloon-expandable coronary stent-graft. CASE REPORT: A 60-year-old woman underwent surgical treatment for a Klatskin tumor, but her postoperative course was complicated by serious blood loss. An emergent celiac angiogram through a right transfemoral approach demonstrated a small iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm in the proximal right hepatic artery. A 7-F guiding catheter was positioned at the origin of the celiac trunk, and a Jostent coronary stent-graft mounted on a 2.7-F, 4-mm x 30-mm balloon catheter was successfully placed across the aneurysm neck. The final angiogram demonstrated total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm with preservation of the arterial lumen. The hemodynamic condition of the patient became stable. At 12-month follow-up, duplex scanning confirmed regular right hepatic artery patency and absence of thrombotic tissue or signs of infection around the stent-graft. CONCLUSION: For hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms, endovascular repair using small covered stents may be a viable alternative to transcatheter embolization. The use of coronary instruments facilitates treatment of vascular lesions in small caliber visceral vessels.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/84. Driver and front seat passenger fatalities associated with air bag deployment. Part 1: A Canadian study.

    Real world motor vehicle collision research of injuries due to deployment of "first-generation" air bags has been conducted by Transport canada since 1993. Fifty-three fatal crashes (36 frontal impacts; 17 side collisions) involving 48 drivers and 10 right front passengers were reviewed. In the Canadian data, air bag deployment in five of nine low severity frontal crashes (delta-V (deltaV) < 25 km/h or 15 mph) was linked to five deaths, four of whom were autopsied (four adults with craniocervical (basal skull and C2 fracture with brainstem avulsion; "closed head injury"--no autopsy) or chest trauma (aortic or pulmonary artery tears); one child with atlanto-occipital dislocation). An occupant who is close ("out-of-position") to the air bag at the time of deployment is at risk for injury. In 27 high severity frontal impacts, unusual (e.g., pulmonary "blast" hemorrhage in one autopsied case) or isolated potentially survivable injuries (e.g., clinically documented ruptured right atrium; probable flail chest observed during the autopsy on a decomposed body) localized to the head, neck or chest in three possibly out-of-position drivers pointed to the deployed air bag as a source of injury. In one of 17 side collisions an out-of-position driver sustained a radiographically confirmed C1-C2 dislocation in a minimally intruded vehicle.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hemorrhage'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.