Cases reported "Hemorrhage"

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1/238. Intrahepatic hemorrhage after use of low-molecular-weight heparin for total hip arthroplasty.

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) has become a popular agent for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and thromboembolic disease after total joint arthroplasty. LMWH allows for consistent dosing in postoperative patients without the need for laboratory monitoring. hemorrhage is an uncommon but documented adverse reaction when using LMWH; however, intrahepatic hemorrhage has not been previously reported in conjunction with LMWH therapy. We report the case of a woman who suffered intrahepatic hemorrhage presenting with acute abdominal pain and vomiting after the use of enoxaparin for total hip arthroplasty.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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2/238. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in the antiphospholipid syndrome: spectrum of disease and treatment.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and treatment of patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who develop diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. methods: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an occasionally reported manifestation of the APS. The diagnosis, however, may be overlooked or manifestations attributed to another disease process. Seven episodes in 5 patients with primary APS were identified and retrospectively reviewed for presenting symptoms and signs, laboratory findings, and response to treatment. RESULTS: The severity of the condition varies, and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage may be the initial manifestation of APS. patients may present with symptoms ranging from cough, dyspnea, and fever with or without hemoptysis, to symptoms of acute respiratory failure. Hypoxemia and anemia are usually present. Other causes need to be excluded. bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage with or without biopsy often aid in confirming the diagnosis. The pathologic abnormality appears to be microvascular thrombosis with or without capillaritis. Treatment with corticosteroids usually leads to marked improvement. CONCLUSION: patients with APS may present with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage resulting in mild to life threatening symptoms. Prompt and thorough evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and treatment with corticosteroids usually leads to rapid improvement. The clinical setting will dictate whether other therapies such as immunosuppressive agents or intravenous immunoglobulin are required.
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ranking = 0.59909188881456
keywords = thrombosis
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3/238. Extensive spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage: an unusual complication of heparin anticoagulation during pregnancy.

    A 27-year-old patient at 13 weeks' gestation maintained on subcutaneous heparinization due to hemoglobin S and hemoglobin c (SC) sickle cell disease and previous splenic vein thrombosis presented with spontaneous acute onset of severe left lower abdominal and groin pain. The pain, which radiated to the anterior aspect of the thigh, was associated with nausea and vomiting and was exacerbated by extension of the left lower extremity. The patient was hemodynamically stable, yet during the first 24 h of hospitalization a marked decrease in hematocrit from 29% to 22% occurred. Contrast computed tomography (CT) revealed an extensive abdominal-pelvic, retroperitoneal hematoma extending approximately 15 cm in length from above L5 cephalad to below the greater trochanter of the left femur caudally. The retroperitoneal hemorrhage self-tamponaded and did not require surgical management. The dosage of heparin was decreased and maintained with appropriate activated partial prothrombin (aPTT) levels. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage complicating heparin anticoagulation in pregnancy. Unusual hemorrhagic complications of anticoagulation therapy are discussed.
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ranking = 0.7031138169181
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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4/238. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report.

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage.
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ranking = 0.036672613106528
keywords = vein
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5/238. Massive intraperitoneal bleeding from tryptic erosions of the splenic vein. Another cause of sudden deterioration during recovery from acute pancreatitis.

    Acute bleeding is a rare, but frequently fatal complication of pancreatitis. Bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract may occur owing to gastric or duodenal erosions, peptic ulcers, or varices in the esophagus, stomach, or colon following splenic vein thrombosis, or intraperitoneally from eroded vessels in pancreatic pseudocysts or expanding pseudoaneurysms. We report a novel case of massive intraperitoneal bleeding owing to tryptic erosions of the splenic vein in a patient recovering from acute pancreatitis. diagnosis of the bleeding was made by ultrasound and ultrasound-guided blood aspiration. The source of the bleeding was identified intraoperatively, and a left-sided pancreatectomy and a splenectomy were performed.
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ranking = 0.88647688245074
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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6/238. radiation-related arterial disease.

    Arterial occlusive disease has been recognized in association with radiation arteriopathy and, rarely, with spontaneous arterial disruption. This association results from the greater role of radiation therapy in the current management of malignant diseases coupled with longer patient survival and the lengthy latency period between radiation and clinical manifestations of radiation arteriopathy. Experience with six patients having radiation-associated arterial disease was retrospectively reviewed. There were four men and two women, with a mean age of 51 years (range, 36-74). arteries exposed to radiation include two carotids, three subclavians, one coronary, and one femoral. The time from radiation therapy until clinical arterial disease was a mean of 14.3 years (range, 4-30). Operative repairs with polytetrafluoroethylene and saphenous vein bypass grafts were performed in four patients, stent placement in one patient, and one patient had spontaneous carotid disruption that ultimately was treated with ligation. In conclusion, elective bypass can be performed safely and successfully for arterial occlusive disease in a previously irradiated artery. In contrast, life-threatening arterial disruption secondary to radiation arteriopathy usually requires concomitant exposure to a source of bacterial contamination, and ligation may be the best choice to prevent recurrent hemorrhage.
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ranking = 0.036672613106528
keywords = vein
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7/238. Coexisting renal vein thrombosis and bilateral adrenal hemorrhage: renoscintigraphic demonstration.

    A rare case of simultaneous renal vein thrombosis and bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is presented, showing the utility of Tc-99m DTPA and DMSA renal scans to identify the condition and to assess renal function. The characteristic appearances of suprarenal tracer-free areas encircled by peripheral radioactive rims over the inferiorly displaced kidneys on a Tc-99m DTPA renal scan, and that of the flattened upper poles of the kidneys on a Tc-99m DMSA scan, were pathognomonic and strongly indicative of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage. These two scans also showed markedly diminished tracer uptake in the poorly functioning right thrombosed kidney. Follow-up imaging using these two renal scans well demonstrated the functional and morphologic alterations and recovery of the kidneys.
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ranking = 3.5155690845905
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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8/238. Catastrophic outcomes of noncardiac surgery soon after coronary stenting.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical course of patients who have undergone coronary stent placement less than six weeks before noncardiac surgery. BACKGROUND: Surgical and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty revascularization performed before high-risk noncardiac surgery is expected to reduce perioperative cardiac morbidity and mortality. Perioperative and postoperative complications in patients who have undergone coronary stenting before a noncardiac surgery have not been studied. methods: Forty patients who underwent coronary stent placement less than six weeks before noncardiac surgery requiring a general anesthesia were included in the study (1-39 days, average: 13 days). The records were screened for the occurrence of adverse clinical events, including myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, peri- and postoperative bleeding and death. RESULTS: In 40 consecutive patients meeting the study criteria, there were seven myocardial infarctions (MIs), 11 major bleeding episodes and eight deaths. All deaths and MIs, as well as 8/11 bleeding episodes, occurred in patients subjected to surgery fewer than 14 days from stenting. Four patients expired after undergoing surgery one day after stenting. Based on electrocardiogram, enzymatic and angiographic evidence, stent thrombosis accounted for most of the fatal events. The time between stenting and surgery appeared to be the main determinant of outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Postponing elective noncardiac surgery for two to four weeks after coronary stenting should permit completion of the mandatory antiplatelet regimen, thereby reducing the risk of stent thrombosis and bleeding complications.
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ranking = 1.7972756664437
keywords = thrombosis
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9/238. A tale of two syndromes: ovarian hyperstimulation and abdominal compartment.

    Abdominal compartment syndrome complicated severe ovarian hyperstimulation in a 35 year old woman with multiple bowel resections due to Crohn's disease. Pain from ovarian enlargement necessitated hospital admission. Despite intravenous fluid administration and heparin prophylaxis, ilio-femoral deep vein thrombosis developed. Treatment by intravenous heparin was complicated by repeated intra-ovarian bleeding, anaemia and acute renal failure requiring haemodialysis. Intra-abdominal pressures were elevated. After placement of an inferior vena caval filter and discontinuation of heparin, there was slow spontaneous recovery without surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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10/238. Genitourinary complications of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    A 14-year-old African-American girl was diagnosed with antiphospholipid-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in July 1994. The course was complicated by nephrotic syndrome, sepsis, hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, saphenous vein thrombosis, cutaneous vasculitis, mesenteric vasculitis, appendicitis, hemorrhagic cystitis, and avascular necrosis of the hips. In August 1997, she developed ovarian and fallopian tube complications secondary to SLE. Genitourinary complications of SLE, however, are uncommon, and ovarian vasculitis has not previously been reported as a complication of SLE. This report describes the course of an adolescent patient with SLE and focuses specifically on her genitourinary complications.
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ranking = 0.7031138169181
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)
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