Cases reported "Hepatic Encephalopathy"

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1/376. A case of primary lymphoma of the liver.

    A case of primary malignant lymphoma of the liver is described. Presenting with epistaxis, he died in hepatic encephalopathy with an intractable bleeding post-bulbar duodenal ulcer.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
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2/376. Resolution of adult respiratory distress syndrome after recovery from fulminant hepatic failure.

    adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) complicating the course of fulminant hepatic failure is nearly always fatal without orthotopic liver transplantation. We report the case of a 50-year-old woman with fulminant hepatic failure and ARDS that resolved after her recovery from the acute liver failure without liver transplantation. The pathogenesis is discussed, particularly with regard to liver-lung interactions.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hepatic
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3/376. Possible response of acute psychosis in hepatic encephalopathy to levodopa.

    A favorable response to levodopa in two episodes of hepatic encephalopathy, the latter presenting as acute psychosis, is described in a patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hepatic
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4/376. hepatic encephalopathy--a physostigmine-reactive central anticholinergic syndrome?

    This report describes an association between hepatic encephalopathy and central anticholinergic syndrome (CAS). A 60-year-old anaemic woman was admitted unconscious and with a delayed reaction to pain but with no focal neurological deficits. She had signs of portal hypertension and a history of non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis grade child B. Suspecting upper gastro-intestinal bleeding, she was intubated for gastro-duodenoscopy and a fibrin-covered ulcer was revealed. Raised intra-abdominal pressure resulting from ascites caused cardiopulmonary failure, which required mechanical ventilation for 24 h, but extubation was possible after drainage of the ascites and blood volume replacement therapy. However, her neurological state remained unchanged despite normal blood ammonia concentration and no sedation. CAS was considered and physostigmine injected with immediate effect. The patient opened her eyes immediately and was fully orientated to personal and medical history. We suggest that hepatic encephalopathy may trigger CAS, although the significance of physostigmine in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy remains to be addressed by controlled investigations.
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ranking = 3
keywords = hepatic
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5/376. Fulminant hepatic failure secondary to congestive heart failure.

    An elderly female with an acute episode of congestive heart failure, unaccompanied by any periods of hypotension, developed fulminant hepatic failure with an accompanying coagulopathy. Attempts to establish an etiology for her acute hepatic insufficiency, other than cardiac failure, proved negative. Fulminant hepatic failure as a consequence of congestive heart failure, without prolonged periods of hypotension preceding alteration in hepatic function, has not heretofore been described. Liver function is adversely effected in congestive heart failure. Hepatic ammonia clearance is impaired in cardiac failure and may be diminished to the point of resulting in hepatic encephalopathy. Coagulopathy is a frequent concomitant of fulminant hepatic failure. Establishing a clear etiology for a coagulopathy in the face of concomitant liver disease is difficult, thus making any therapeutic intervention fraught with peril.
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ranking = 10
keywords = hepatic
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6/376. Unexpected severe hypocalcemia during continuous venovenous hemodialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation.

    Citrate is known to induce acute hypocalcemia in patients undergoing liver transplantation during the anhepatic phase. We describe the case of a 71-year-old woman with fulminant hepatic failure secondary to hepatitis a, who was started on continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD) for acute renal failure. Because anticoagulation with heparin was untenable, regional anticoagulation was accomplished by trisodium citrate (46.7%) infusion. Unfortunately, severe hypocalcemia developed when citrate accumulated because of impaired hepatic metabolism. Because of chelation by citrate, the ionized calcium concentration declined to values as low as 2.72 mg/dL (normal, 4.5 to 5.6 mg/dL), whereas the total calcium concentration remained in the normal range. With an unusually high calcium chloride infusion rate via a central line (up to 140 mL/h of 10 mEq/dL CaCl2) and additional boli of CaCl2 (for a total of 190 mEq), the ionized calcium concentration could be maintained at target levels. Nevertheless, the ionized calcium concentration was maintained in the normal range, and the total calcium concentration increased to a value as high as 15 mg/dL. Thus, the total to ionized calcium ratio was 3.5:1. After 24 hours of treatment, trisodium citrate infusion was gradually reduced from 15 mL/h to 7 mL/h, and the calcium chloride infusion was decreased to 50 mL/h. Nevertheless, persistence of the elevated total to ionized calcium ratio (3:1) indicated citrate accumulation likely secondary to decreased hepatic metabolism. Using this approach, the patient was successfully maintained on CVVHD with regional citrate anticoagulation for a total of 11 days without any additional complications. We conclude that CVVHD with regional citrate anticoagulation can be used in patients with acute hepatic failure if increased CaCl2 requirements are anticipated and if citrate is infused at a lower rate compatible with decreased citrate metabolism. Citrate accumulation should be suspected in patients with an elevated total to ionized Ca ratio during CVVHD with citrate anticoagulation.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hepatic
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7/376. Case report: intrahepatic portal-hepatic venous shunts associated with a huge pelvic leiomyoma.

    We present a case of portal-systemic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic multiple portal-hepatic venous shunts. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of recurrent episodes of disturbed consciousness. She showed no clinical signs of portal hypertension. Liver function was normal, except for an indocyanine green retention rate of 34% at 15 min and blood ammonia level of 282 microg/dL. Portal venography revealed dilatation of the portal vein and multiple portal-hepatic venous shunts, and a liver biopsy specimen revealed almost normal liver. Further clinical examination revealed a huge pelvic tumour. At laparotomy, two dilated veins were seen to arise from the pelvic tumour with blood flow into the mesentery. The tumour was resected successfully and a histological diagnosis of leiomyoma was made. The blood ammonia concentration decreased to the normal range postoperatively. A follow-up portal venogram demonstrated decreased portal vein dilatation and minor portal-hepatic venous shunts, considered to be congenital in origin. It is concluded that hepatic encephalopathy was produced in this patient due to an excess portal blood flow from the huge pelvic leiomyoma via the mesentery, with portosystemic shunting through pre-existent (probably congenital) intrahepatic anastomoses.
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ranking = 14
keywords = hepatic
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8/376. A boy with fatal infectious mononucleosis suspected as the first Japanese case of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    We report a case of a 10-month-old boy who died of severe hepatic failure after a prolonged course of infectious mononucleosis. He also presented interstitial pneumonitis, meningoencephalitis and aplastic anaemia. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity had not been detected in his peripheral blood during the course of the illness. Studies of his mother revealed a severe reactivation pattern of anti-EBV antibodies and decreased EBV-specific CTL activity. An X-linked familial susceptibility to EBV infection such as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) might be associated with his fatal EBV infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
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9/376. Fulminant Wilsonian hepatitis unmasked by disease progression: report of a case and review of the literature.

    Among various hepatic manifestations of Wilson's disease, fulminant hepatic failure is the most uncommon entity and requires a detailed clinicopathological analysis for correct diagnosis. Left unrecognized and without proper therapy, in time the disease rapidly progresses to death. We describe a 24-year-old woman who died within five weeks of the onset of Wilson's disease, which presented with a dramatic course. Discriminating features of the disease are discussed with regard to the literature.
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ranking = 2
keywords = hepatic
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10/376. Long-term extracorporeal bilirubin elimination: A case report on cascade resin plasmaperfusion.

    Acute hepatic failure develops as a disease entity of rather diverse origin. With disease progression, toxic bilirubin levels may cause severe complications which include AV-nodal blockage, cardiac arrhythmia, impaired consciousness, generalized seizures, and status epilepticus. Treatment choices to prevent clinical deterioration comprise of costly and limited available orthotopic liver transplantation, utilization of extracorporeal bioartificial liver support devices and haemoperfusion/plasmaperfusion treatment with activated charcoal/anion exchange filters. Here, we present a patient with acute drug-induced cholestatic hepatitis. Excessively elevated bilirubin levels were accompanied by cardiac and cerebral complications. Extracorporeal resin perfusion treatment (Plasorba, BR-350) was successfully performed over a 50-day period without activation of the coagulation system or side effects. bilirubin levels were lowered to a minimum of 225 micromol/l, with concurrent clinical improvement. In conclusion, extracorporeal anion exchange plasmaperfusion may be a viable long-term treatment for hyperbilirubinaemic side effects in overt cholestatic hepatitis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
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