Cases reported "Hepatitis, Viral, Human"

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1/181. Fatal herpetic hepatitis in adult following short corticotherapy: a case report.

    herpes simplex virus hepatitis (HSV hepatitis) is an uncommon and severe complication of HSV type 1 and HSV type 2 infection. HSV hepatitis affects mostly immunocompromised patients. We report the case of a young man without any previous known immunodeficiency who developed fatal HSV hepatitis in the first 8 days of oral corticotherapy given for ulcerative colitis. A prompt diagnosis was possible because HSV was recovered from peripheral blood leukocytes.
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keywords = virus
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2/181. Possible association between serum gb virus c rna level and disease activity in fulminant hepatitis type G.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Whether gb virus c causes serious liver diseases remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is an etiological relationship between gb virus c and fulminant hepatitis. methods: The level of gb virus c rna in the sera of three patients with fulminant hepatitis was quantitatively determined using the newly developed real-time detection polymerase chain reaction method, which is based on Taq Man chemistry. The NS 3 region of the viral genome isolated from the sera was sequenced at several time points to confirm whether the same virus was responsible for fulminant hepatitis during the patients' clinical courses. RESULTS: The sensitivity of the PCR was comparable to that of nested PCR and a linear relationship between rna copy number and threshold cycle was observed for 10(1) and 10(6) rna copies/ml (r = 0.99). The serum level of gb virus c rna closely paralleled that of ALT in all patients. sequence analysis of the NS3 region isolated from the patients' sera revealed that the same gb virus c strain infected the patients during their entire clinical courses, despite plasma exchange therapy. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that gb virus c may be etiologically associated with fulminant hepatic failure, and is not merely an inactive bystander introduced by therapeutic plasma exchange.
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keywords = virus
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3/181. Fulminant herpes hepatitis in a healthy adult: a treatable disorder?

    Hepatitis due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a potentially fatal disorder that is often not considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hepatitis. This disease occurs most often in patients with impaired immunity and is very uncommon in healthy patients. HSV hepatitis presents with a wide clinical spectrum, and the clinical diagnosis is difficult. We describe a case of disseminated herpes virus infection with fulminant hepatitis mimicking an acute human immunodeficiency virus infection in a 33-year-old healthy man. Preliminary studies suggest that early treatment of HSV hepatitis with acyclovir may be beneficial in these patients. A high index of suspicion and the availability of early diagnostic tools, such as HSV dna detection, may dramatically improve the clinical outcome of severe HSV hepatitis.
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keywords = virus
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4/181. herpes simplex hepatitis in pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    Fulminant hepatic dysfunction in the third trimester of pregnancy accompanied by fever may result from disseminated herpes simplex virus. Since 1969, 24 cases of herpes simplex hepatitis, including the current case, have been reported. Mucocutaneous lesions are present in only half of cases; therefore, suspicion for diagnosis of this disease is low. Twenty-five percent of cases were not diagnosed until autopsy. Maternal and perinatal mortality are high, approaching 39 percent for both mother and fetus. Early recognition with initiation of antiviral therapy appears to be most important in maximizing survival.
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keywords = virus
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5/181. Hepatitis G virus infection as a possible causative agent of community-acquired hepatitis and associated aplastic anaemia.

    Aplastic anaemia complicating hepatitis is a rare but well-documented phenomenon; however in many patients the cause remains unknown. We present a 24-year-old man with a well-defined community-acquired hepatitis, probably due to hepatitis G virus (HGV), who developed severe aplastic anaemia. In this case, the absence of other agents likely to cause the clinical manifestations, and the detection of HGV rna at the time of illness, clearly point to this agent as being responsible for both the hepatitis and the aplastic anaemia. Further studies in serial serum samples and meticulous evaluation of the disorders associated with the infection will be needed to prove or dispute a causal association of HGV and aplastic anaemia.
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keywords = virus
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6/181. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with subendothelial deposits (type 1) associated with hepatitis G virus infection in a renal transplant recipient.

    BACKGROUND: Infection with hepatitis b virus (HBV) or hepatitis c virus (HCV) is a well-known etiology for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) with subendothelial deposits (MPGN type 1). MATERIAL AND methods: The newly discovered hepatitis G virus (HGV) is currently under active investigation. We report the first case of de novo MPGN type 1 associated with HGV infection in a young male renal transplant recipient who manifested glomerulonephritis (GN) with proteinuria 7 years after transplant, and whose original disease was chronic obstructive pyelonephritis secondary to nephrolithiasis. RESULTS: serum markers for HBV and HCV infections were negative. HGV infection was detected by specific double-nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in sera (positive HGV viremia) 2.5 years after renal transplantation. By specific in situ RT-PCR, the presence of the HGV genome was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in the kidney biopsy (glomeruli and tubules), but not in the liver. CONCLUSION: This report adds new information on the role of HGV infection in the occurrence of de novo GN (MPGN type 1) in renal transplantation.
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ranking = 7
keywords = virus
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7/181. Acute cholestatic hepatitis by cytomegalovirus in an immunocompetent patient resolved with ganciclovir.

    We report a case of acute cholestatic hepatitis in an immunocompetent young male with cytomegalovirus (CMV) primoinfection episode. The severity of the clinical symptoms led to a high-dose treatment with parenteral ganciclovir, with an immediate response and total resolution of symptoms. Therapeutic options are discussed, particularly the use of ganciclovir, even in immunocompetent patients when the severity of the symptoms could demand it.
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ranking = 5
keywords = virus
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8/181. hepatitis c virus but not gb virus c/hepatitis G virus has a role in type II cryoglobulinemia.

    OBJECTIVE: hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection is associated with type II cryoglobulinemia. HCV is specifically concentrated in type II cryoglobulins and has been implicated in the cutaneous vasculitis associated with the disease. In contrast to HCV, a role for hepatitis G virus (HGV) in type II cryoglobulinemia has not been defined, although prevalences as high as 43% of HGV infections in type II cryoglobulinemia have also been reported. methods: We studied 34 patients with type II and 29 patients with type III cryoglobulinemia associated with HCV infection, 6 patients with essential mixed cryoglobulinemia (EMC; all with type II), 50 hospital control patients, and 125 normal individuals. serum HCV and HGV rna were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In coinfected sera, HCV and HGV were quantitated by competitive RT-PCR assays. One coinfected patient was studied longitudinally for 6 years. RESULTS: Two (5.9%) of 34 patients with HCV-infected type II cryoglobulinemia, none of 29 patients with type III cryoglobulinemia, and none of 6 patients with EMC were positive for HGV rna, for an overall prevalence of 3.0% in mixed cryoglobulinemia. None of the control populations were positive for HGV. No statistical difference was seen between the prevalence in patients with type II cryoglobulinemia and the other populations studied. In coinfected sera, HCV, but not HGV, was concentrated in cryoglobulins, and HCV, but not HGV, correlated with cryoglobulinemia in a longitudinal study. CONCLUSION: There is a low prevalence of coinfection with HGV in patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia and HCV infection in the united states. HCV is selectively precipitated by type II cryoglobulins in coinfected sera. HGV infection does not appear to have a role in mixed cryoglobulinemia.
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ranking = 14
keywords = virus
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9/181. Analysis of immune cells in a patient with post-transfusion hepatitis caused by human cytomegalovirus.

    Cellular immune responses are associated with the pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) hepatitis. We investigated a patient with post-transfusion HCMV hepatitis. A 9 year-old girl was involved in a traffic accident and suffered from traumatic damage to the left kidney and diaphragm and received a pelvic bone fracture. At emergency surgery she was transfused with 1200 ml of fresh whole donor blood. Abnormal liver function was observed in the 10 days after surgery. Titers of serum anti-HCMV IgG and IgM antibodies were elevated at 11, 17 and 25 weeks after operation. We analyzed the surface markers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained 21 weeks after surgery. The CD4/CD8 ratio and the number of CD16 CD56 decreased. We detected HCMV immediate early (IE) dna in the fractionated peripheral blood cells (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, CD2 , CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes) by polymerase chain reaction. The histology of liver biopsy at 23 weeks after operation showed the findings of acute hepatitis and the absence of HCMV IE antigen. It was considered that the immunosuppressive condition associated with the trauma, operation or transfusion itself induced the reactivation of HCMV or that transfused blood cells infected with HCMV caused reinfection. It was also speculated that HCMV hepatitis was not only due to the direct damage of hepatic cells by HCMV, but also due to the cellular immune responses associated with HCMV infection.
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ranking = 5
keywords = virus
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10/181. budd-chiari syndrome complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma with no evidence of infection with hepatitis virus: a case report.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in patients with budd-chiari syndrome. However, the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma accompanied with budd-chiari syndrome has not been elucidated. We report a case of budd-chiari syndrome with membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma in an 80 year-old man. There was no evidence of co-infection with hepatitis a, B, C, D, E, and G virus. Histologically, the non-cancerous liver tissue showed chronic venous congestion with no evidence of hepatitis virus-associated liver cirrhosis. This case suggests that chronic venous congestion of the liver may be one of the pathologic conditions that occurs in hepatocellular carcinoma.
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ranking = 6
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