Cases reported "Hepatitis A"

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1/7. Autoimmune complications associated with hepatitis a virus infection in children.

    hepatitis a virus infection is usually a self-limited disease during childhood. Autoimmune manifestations are rarely reported among patients. We describe two children with acute hepatitis A infection who developed immune thrombocytopenia and hepatic venous thrombosis during the course of acute infection. Antiphospholipid antibodies were increased in both of them during the thrombocytopenic and thrombotic complications and decreased during the resolution of these events.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombocytopenic
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2/7. thrombocytopenia and emperipolesis in a patient with hepatitis a infection.

    lmmune thrombocytopenia is a benign, self-limiting disease in children, responding well to treatment and generally associated with viral infections. A 13-year-old girl was admitted to a hospital with the epistaxis and purpura after an attack of jaundice 6 weeks before. The diagnosis of hepatitis a virus (HAV)-induced thrombocytopenia was made. Furthermore, erythrophagocytosis by megakaryocytes was demonstrated in the bone marrow of the patient. Although hematologic complications following hepatitis b and C viruses are commonly reported, the association of hepatitis a virus and thrombocytopenia has rarely been described.
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ranking = 0.26953261915811
keywords = purpura
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3/7. Acute infantile haemorrhagic oedema associated with hepatitis A.

    Acute infantile haemorrhagic oedema (AIHO) is characterised by purpura, ecchymosis and inflammatory oedema of the face and extremities. It is seen in children aged 4-24 months. The atiology is not known. We report a case of AIHO diagnosed by skin biopsy demonstrating leukocyte-elastic vasculitis. Laboratory studies showed positive hepatitis A IgM and IgG antibodies. The liver function tests were normal, indicating subclinical hepatitis. Cryoglobulinaemia was detected, suggesting that the disease was related to hepatitis A.
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ranking = 0.26953261915811
keywords = purpura
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4/7. Relapsing hepatitis A. review of 14 cases and literature survey.

    We have reviewed our experience with 14 cases of relapsing hepatitis A (RH-A), as well as 68 cases reported in the literature. Relapse occurs in 3 to 20% of patients with acute hepatitis A, and rarely takes the form of a polyphasic disease (multiple relapses). After a stage of typical hepatitis A, remission phase ensues, with partial or complete resolution of clinical and biochemical manifestations. Relapse usually occurs after a short period (usually less than 3 weeks). Relapse is usually clinically milder than the first phase, with variable liver function abnormalities and a tendency toward more marked cholestatic features. Not uncommonly, immune manifestations occur during this phase, including purpura, nephritis, and arthralgia, with common laboratory findings of rheumatoid factor as well as false-positive reaction to HCV-EIA tests. The clinical course in relapsing hepatitis A is almost always benign, and uneventful recovery is the rule with few exceptions. Steroid treatment, first reported in the present series, resulted in marked clinical improvement. Preliminary results suggest that R-HA is associated with a continuing viremia as well as shedding of virus in stools during the relapse phase. The pathogenesis of R-HA probably involves an interaction between persistent viral infection and immune mechanisms responding to the continuing antigenic stimulation.
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ranking = 0.26953261915811
keywords = purpura
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5/7. Thrombocytopenic purpura as initial presentation of acute hepatitis A.

    Extrahepatic immune manifestations are rare in hepatitis a virus infection. We report a 4 1/2-year-old girl who presented with thrombocytopenic purpura as initial manifestation of hepatitis a virus infection. She responded to steroid therapy.
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ranking = 2.3476630957905
keywords = thrombocytopenic, purpura
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6/7. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with hepatitis A.

    A 23-year-old man developed thrombocytopenic purpura at the end of the second week of the clinical evolution of hepatitis A confirmed by viral markers. The bone marrow of this patient showed megakaryocytic hyperplasia. Circulating in his serum immune complexes were demonstrated by solid phase conglutinin enzymo-immunoassay. Platelet-reactive serum factors were also detected by an indirect immunofluorescence test using fresh donor platelets as targets. The evolution of both the hepatitis and the purpura were benign with no therapy other than bedrest. platelet count normalized within five weeks of the onset of purpura, and IgM antibodies against hepatitis a virus as well as circulating immune complexes dropped to normal levels. It is postulated that the thrombocytopenia of this case was caused by nonspecific deposition of immune complexes at the platelet surface.
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ranking = 6.8867283341067
keywords = thrombocytopenic, purpura
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7/7. Thrombocytopenic purpura as a manifestation of acute hepatitis A.

    Extrahepatic autoimmune manifestations are rare in patients with acute hepatitis A infection. We describe a 34-year-old man in whom severe autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura developed as the manifestation of acute hepatitis A infection. Thrombocytopenic purpura is rarely described in association with hepatitis A, but to our knowledge has never been reported as a manifestation of acute hepatitis A.
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ranking = 2.6171957149486
keywords = thrombocytopenic, purpura
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