Cases reported "Hepatitis E"

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1/54. HBsAg carrier with simultaneous amebic liver abscess and acute hepatitis E.

    hepatitis e virus (HEV) infection and amebiasis are waterborne diseases that are endemic in india. However, their co-occurrence has never been described. We report a patient who presented with fever, jaundice and tender hepatomegaly and on investigation was found to have coexisting acute hepatitis E and amebic liver abscess. Incidentally, he was also an HBsAg carrier.
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keywords = hepatitis, b
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2/54. Acute pancreatitis associated with viral hepatitis: a report of six cases with review of literature.

    association of hepatitis viruses with acute pancreatitis in the setting of nonfulminant viral hepatitis is rare. We report six cases of nonfulminant viral hepatitis complicated by acute pancreatitis, including the first documented case of hepatitis e virus (HEV) associated acute pancreatitis. The other five patients had acute viral hepatitis caused by hepatitis A infection. Besides features of viral hepatitis, the presence of typical abdominal pain, high serum amylase, and ultrasound or CT scan features suggested the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. This complication generally developed in the initial phase of the hepatitic illness. All of the patients had mild to moderate pancreatitis that recovered uneventfully with conservative treatment.
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ranking = 2.1999977911707
keywords = hepatitis, b
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3/54. Sporadic acute hepatitis E in the united kingdom: an underdiagnosed phenomenon?

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E (HEV) is the primary cause of enterically transmitted non-A non-B hepatitis worldwide. case reports of HEV in individuals in the United Kingdom relate to travel to endemic areas or contact with individuals who have visited these areas. case reports: Four individuals presented with acute hepatitis to a hepatology clinic in a teaching hospital. serology confirmed acute hepatitis E in all four. Investigation by the communicable disease control Department established no links between the cases, no travel to an endemic area, and no contacts. CONCLUSION: Contrary to current belief, community acquired hepatitis e virus infection occurs sporadically in the United Kingdom and should be considered as a cause of seronegative hepatitis.
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ranking = 1.7999984744776
keywords = hepatitis, b
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4/54. dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome with coexisting acute hepatitis E.

    A 14-year-old girl presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, skin rash and hepatitis after starting dapsone. All abnormalities reversed with institution of prednisolone therapy after discontinuation of dapsone. The hepatic involvement was of hepatocellular type; it was associated with IgM anti-HEV antibodies, suggesting coexisting acute hepatitis E. We believe a causal link between the hepatotrophic viruses and dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome could exist.
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ranking = 1.1999989829851
keywords = hepatitis, b
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5/54. plasmodium falciparum and hepatitis e virus co-infection in fulminant hepatic failure.

    Acute hepatitis E and falciparum malaria can each present with fulminant hepatic failure and are common in tropical countries. However, co-existence of these two conditions has not been reported. We report a 20-year-old girl who presented with fever and altered sensorium. Peripheral smear was positive for plasmodium falciparum, and IgM anti-HEV was positive. She died despite antimalarial drugs and supportive management. Postmortem liver tissue showed changes suggestive of acute viral hepatitis.
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ranking = 1.1999987446222
keywords = hepatitis, b
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6/54. Acute hepatitis caused by a novel strain of hepatitis e virus most closely related to united states strains.

    A unique hepatitis e virus (HEV) strain was identified as the aetiological agent of acute hepatitis in a united states (US) patient who had recently returned from vacation in thailand, a country in which HEV is endemic. Sequence comparison showed that this HEV strain was most similar, but not identical, to the swine and human HEV strains recovered in the US. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this new HEV isolate was closer to genotype 3 strains than to the genotype 1 strains common in asia. The fact that this HEV was closely related to strains recovered in countries where HEV is not endemic and was highly divergent from Asian HEV strains raises the questions of where the patient's infection was acquired and of whether strains are geographically as localized as once thought.
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ranking = 1.9999981725513
keywords = hepatitis, b
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7/54. Acute hepatitis e virus infection presenting as a prolonged cholestatic jaundice.

    hepatitis e virus (HEV) is an enteric virus that usually causes a self-resolving hepatitis; although, it may be fatal, especially in pregnant women. Although HEV is endemic in israel, there have been no recent local outbreaks. We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with painless jaundice. Ultrasound and abdominal computed tomography scan revealed gallstones, with no evidence of cholecystitis and no dilatation of the intra-or extrahepatic bile ducts. An open cholecystectomy was performed with intraoperative cholangiography. There was no evidence of choledocholithiasis. A subsequent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was normal. His bilirubin level subsequently increased to a maximum of 25 mg/dL, and his gamma-glutamyl-transferase level reached 1,400 U/L. There was no evidence of any autoimmune or metabolic disease, and routine viral serology was normal except for immunoglobulin g to hepatitis a virus. A liver biopsy revealed an acute cholestatic picture. The jaundice resolved slowly after a period of 6 months. hepatitis e virus rna was isolated from the acute-phase serum and was not detectable in the convalescent serum. This case is a unique example of chronic cholestatic jaundice that we think is caused by acute HEV infection.
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ranking = 1.199999777528
keywords = hepatitis, b
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8/54. Partial sequence analysis of indigenous hepatitis e virus isolated in the United Kingdom.

    The first nucleotide sequences of hepatitis e virus (HEV) acquired in the United Kingdom are described. The sequences are novel and are related most closely to HEV isolated from greece (greece 2 strain), consistent with their having been derived from an indigenous European virus. HEV was assumed until recently to be rare in the United Kingdom and other industrialised countries and, consequently, hepatitis E may be under-diagnosed in industrialised countries.
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ranking = 1.1999989829851
keywords = hepatitis, b
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9/54. Severe acute pancreatitis in acute hepatitis E.

    We report an 18-year-old boy with severe acute pancreatitis developing during acute hepatitis E and complicated by sepsis and acute renal failure. The patient recovered on supportive management.
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ranking = 0.99999904654849
keywords = hepatitis, b
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10/54. Typhoid, hepatitis E, or typhoid and hepatitis E: the cause of fulminant hepatic failure--a diagnostic dilemma.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of hepatitis E-induced fulminant hepatic failure associated with typhoid fever, diagnosed with the Widal test. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Eight-bed medical/surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. PATIENT: A 15-yr-old, 50-kg male with grade IV hepatic encephalopathy was admitted to the intensive care unit for ventilatory support. On admission to the intensive care unit he had had fever associated with loss of appetite and nausea for 15 days, jaundice for 4 days, and altered sensorium for 2 days. INTERVENTION: He was intubated and kept on elective ventilation. Tracheal aspirate, blood, urine, and stool were sterile. Anti-coma measures were instituted in the form of 20 degrees head elevation; mannitol, lactulose, and ampicillin through a nasogastric tube; and bowel wash. The mainstay of fluid therapy was 20% dextrose. Viral marker was positive for hepatitis E. He showed a favorable recovery but continued to have high-grade fever (39-40 degrees C). On investigation, peripheral blood smear was negative for malarial parasite, and Widal was positive. Fever responded to treatment with ceftazidime. RESULT: The patient recovered with anti-coma and anti-typhoid therapy. CONCLUSION: In viral hepatitis, fever is usually present in the prodromal phase but subsides before appearance of the icteric phase. In endemic areas, if fever is present in the icteric phase of hepatitis, typhoid also should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever, even in the absence of positive cultures for salmonella typhi. The Widal test may be helpful in reaching a diagnosis.
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ranking = 2.3999984426959
keywords = hepatitis, b
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