Cases reported "Hernia, Hiatal"

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1/82. Esophageal ulcer and alendronate.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of esophageal ulcer associated with the use of alendronate. CASE REPORT: This is the fifth case ever described in the literature according to our bibliographic review. In our patient, the association between the drug and the esophageal lesions was masked by the presence of a hiatal hernia, potentially a cause of the esophageal lesion. The persistence of the lesions despite high doses of anti-reflux therapy called attention to the possibility of the relationship. The esophageal lesion healed soon after suspension of alendronate. DISCUSSION: The authors present a review of the literature and point to the need for diagnostic investigation, to suspend such a drug from patients who experience dyspeptic symptoms while using it.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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2/82. pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic antireflux surgery: a case report and review of the literature.

    Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are concerning causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing general surgical procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has gained rapid acceptance in the past several years and is now a commonly performed procedure by most general surgeons. Multiple anecdotal reports of pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been reported, but the true incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery is not known. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia. The literature is then reviewed regarding the incidence of pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic surgery, the mechanism of deep venous thrombosis formation, and the recommendations for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in patients undergoing laparoscopic procedures.
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ranking = 4
keywords = reflux
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3/82. Transient left vocal cord paralysis during laparoscopic surgery for an oesophageal hiatus hernia.

    A 45-year-old male, with symptoms of many years standing of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, was subjected, under general anaesthesia, to laparoscopic fundoplication. Tracheal intubation yielded no problems but great difficulties were encountered during tube insertion into the oesophagus. After surgery, aphonia developed. Laryngological examination demonstrated paralysis of the left vocal cord. voice strength returned to the pre-operative status after 3 months, and laryngological examination confirmed normal mobility of both cords. The possible cause of the complication was damage to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve which occurred during insertion of the tube into the oesophagus. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease causing 'acid laryngitis' can create conditions favouring this type of complication.
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ranking = 2
keywords = reflux
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4/82. Acute intrathoracic incarceration of the stomach after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

    A rare case of paraesophageal hernia with complete intrathoracic incarceration of the stomach after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is described. An 85-year-old woman who had undergone laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease presented 14 months later with nausea and vomiting. Esophagogastroendoscopy showed obstruction of the esophagogastric junction and gastric mucosal necrosis. Emergency laparotomy showed the stomach to be entirely strangulated into the thorax, with areas of necrosis. Gastrotomy was followed by resection of the necrotic anterior wall of the stomach, closure of the hiatus, and suturing of the stomach to the diaphragm. Appropriate closure of crura and anchoring suture between the stomach and diaphragm are helpful to prevent recurrent hernia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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5/82. Oesophageal surgery.

    A wide variety of benign conditions affecting the oesophagus which have long been recognized in association with hiatus hernia are now known to be attributable to reflux oesophagitis. The development of modern methods of treatment of these conditions is described with reference to a number of illustrative cases.
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ranking = 9.4792785786658
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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6/82. Gastropericardial fistula after failure of laparoscopic hiatal repair.

    We describe a 77-year-old patient with gastropericardial fistula occurring 5 years after laparoscopic surgery for hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux. The patient presented with isolated intermittent substernal pain without fever. Chest radiographs disclosed extensive pneumopericardium and thoracic computed tomography suggested gastropericardial fistula between the pericardium and the surgical wrap, slipped into the thorax. Emergency surgery allowed successful repair through laparotomy via the trans-hiatal approach.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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7/82. Laparoscopic management of a paraesophageal hernia with intrathoracic stomach in infants.

    Paraesophageal hernia type III in which the stomach lies in the thorax is a rare condition in children. Recently two children presented with a large type III paraesophageal hernia with an intrathoracic stomach. The stomach could be retrieved from the thorax laparoscopically and the procedure was completed with a Thai antireflux procedure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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8/82. adenocarcinoma in a Barrett oesophagus.

    A case of adenocarcinoma developing at the squamocolumnar epithelial junction of a Barrett oesophagus is reported. This rare tumour was remarkable because of the youth of the patient and because of the signet-cell cytological pattern of the neoplasm. It is postulated that both the columnar epithelial lining of the lower part of the oesophagus and the malignant change are a consequence of long-standing oesophageal reflux.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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9/82. Coexisting achalasia and paraoesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Disorders of the oesophagus present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The presenting symptoms of dysphagia, reflux, pain and vomiting are almost universal, irrespective of the underlying pathology. A combination of endoscopy, barium studies, pH studies and manometry are often required to determine the exact diagnosis and to plan the most effective treatment. Paraoesophageal hiatal hernia is an uncommon condition, present in 14% of all hiatal hernias, which requires urgent correction to prevent life-threatening complications. It is unusual for other oesophageal disorders to coexist. We present a case where achalasia and a paraoesophageal hiatal hernia probably coexisted.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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10/82. "True" parahiatal hernia: a rare entity radiologic presentation and clinical management.

    BACKGROUND: True parahiatal diaphragmatic hernias are rare entities that are sparsely accounted for in the literature. The current report is intended to depict the clinical profile and assess the feasibility of laparoscopic repair of parahiatal hernias. methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients diagnosed and treated for parahiatal hernias. Clinical presentation and radiological assessment, as well as operative findings and repair, are discussed. RESULTS: Of the 917 laparoscopic hiatal hernia repairs, 2 (0.2%) patients were identified with a parahiatal hernia. The presenting symptoms and preoperative testing were similar to those with more common paraesophageal hernias. Laparoscopic repair was successful in repairing the diaphragmatic defect and alleviating symptoms up to 4 years postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Parahiatal hernias of the diaphragm appear to be rare primary diaphragmatic defects. The clinical presentation of parahiatal hernias is often indistinguishable from the more common paraesophageal pathology. Laparoscopic repair of this rare entity can be safely and successfully accomplished in conjunction with antireflux surgical interventions when indicated.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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