Cases reported "Hernia, Hiatal"

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11/82. Outpatient laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease affects more than 40% of Americans, causing heartburn and reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus when bending or lying down. Lifestyle modification, such as weight loss and a diet rich in protein and low in fat and glucose, should increase the patient's resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Avoiding exacerbating substances, such as mint, chocolate, alcohol, and tobacco, also may reduce symptoms. Medications may be prescribed to reduce persistent symptoms, although no medication currently available cures the disease process. patients who need antireflux medication regularly for four to six weeks or more may be candidates for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. patients who do not want to take antireflux medication for the rest of their lives, cannot afford the medication for an extended period of time, or suffer significant side effects from the medication also are candidates. This article describes performing Nissen fundoplication laparoscopically on an outpatient basis. The average length of hospital stay has been decreased to two to three hours when performed laparoscopically on an outpatient basis from 10 days for the open procedure and two to three days when performed laparoscopically on an inpatient basis. The incidence of recurrent heartburn is less than 2% when the procedure is performed laparoscopically and does not appear to be clinically significant.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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12/82. Rapidly growing mycobacterial pulmonary infection in association with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Pulmonary infection due to rapidly growing mycobacteria (Runyan group IV) is uncommon and may be overlooked or misdiagnosed. Esophageal disorders have been recognized as a potential risk factor predisposing for this infection. A 35-year-old Sri Lankan patient, with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease and a hiatus hernia, contracted a pulmonary infection with mycobacterium fortuitum-chelonae. He had severe airway obstruction and focal bronchiectasis, and responded to treatment with ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin. The case is reported to alert clinicians to the pathogenic potential of these organisms and to the prompt institution of appropriate chemotherapy once infection is recognized.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = reflux
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13/82. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor, associated with esophageal hiatus hernia.

    An 85-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting. An upper gastrointestinal series what showed a large esophageal hiatus hernia, suggesting an association with extrinsic pressure in the middle portion of the stomach. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination showed severe esophagitis and a prominent narrowing in the middle portion of the stomach, however, it showed normal gastric mucosa findings. CT and MRI revealed a large tumor extending from the region of the lower chest to the upper abdomen. From these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), which arose from the gastric wall and complicated with an esophageal hiatus hernia. We performed a laparotomy, however, the tumor showed severe invasion to the circumferential organs. Therefore, we abandoned the excision of the tumor. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle shaped cells with marked nuclear atypia and prominent mitosis. The tumor cells were strongly positive for CD34 and c-kit by immunohistochemical examination. From these findings, the tumor was definitely diagnosed as a malignant GIST. As palliative treatment, we implanted a self-expandable metallic stent in the narrow segment of the stomach. The patient could eat solid food and was discharged. In the treatment of esophageal hiatus hernia, the rare association of GIST should be considered.
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ranking = 2.1198196446665
keywords = esophagitis
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14/82. Esophageal hernia in dementia: surgeon's role for mixed-type esophageal hernia in an elderly woman with dementia.

    The mixed-type esophageal hernia is an indication for operation to prevent stomach volvulus and perforation. However, preventive operation is meaningful depending on the physical status. We encountered an 84-year-old, demented, bed-ridden woman of mixed-type esophageal hernia complicated with severe reflux esophagitis. First, the patient was conservatively treated by intravenous hyperalimentation and H2 blocker but, with onset of delirium, she removed the venous route twice. Subsequently, she was tightly restrained to the bed to avoid removing the line. Ethical deliberation for the patient tightly fixed to the bed and intravenous alimentation for her life prompted us to reconsider hernia operation after discussion with surrogate decision makers. The patient recovered uneventfully after operation, and movement without intravenous route or without any restraints was maintained by oral feeding assisted by gastrostomy feeding. In the coming decade, when senior patients are expected to increase, such operations can be forwarded to respect the patients' quality of life.
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ranking = 2.3698196446665
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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15/82. Isolated trans-hiatal colonic herniation.

    Isolated herniation of the colon through congenital or traumatic diaphragmatic defects are well documented. However, trans-hiatal herniation of the colon in the absence of an intrathoracic stomach has been reported only once. A 67-year-old man presented with intragastric abdominal pain and a chest x-ray film documenting a posterior mediastinal air-fluid level. Computed tomography showed gastrointestinal contents within the thorax. The findings on an upper gastrointestinal film with small bowel follow-through were normal. Finally, a barium enema identified transverse colon within the thoracic cavity. At laparoscopy, the entire transverse colon was reduced with the hernia sac. The crural defect was repaired, and a Toupet fundoplication was performed. A gastropexy was also added. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2 able to tolerate a regular diet, and he has been asymptomatic for 5 months. This defect most likely represents a congenital deformity of the diaphragm with intact posterior gastric attachments, including the posterior phrenoesophageal ligament. An intact gastric mesentery enabled isolated colonic herniation with retention of the stomach its normal anatomic position. An antireflux procedure was performed in addition to the crural repair because of the circumferential dissection of the esophagus. This article is the second report of an isolated trans-hiatal herniation of the colon and the first report of laparoscopic repair of this entity.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = reflux
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16/82. Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux associated with paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

    BACKGROUND: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be associated with episodes of bronchoaspiration, sometimes leading to life-threatening respiratory complications. GERD is frequently observed in the setting of type 1 (sliding type) hiatal hernia, but only infrequently complicates the course of type 2 (paraesophageal) hernia. methods OF STUDY: We performed a retrospective analysis of 50 patients operated for type 2 hiatal hernia in our hospital, to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints related to GERD in this setting. RESULTS: We found 7 cases (14%) of type 2 hiatal hernia complicated by pulmonary manifestations as the only symptoms of GERD. These ranged from dyspnea to severe bronchoconstriction and acute respiratory failure. The series is illustrated by the report of 1 patient who experienced acute bronchospasm and cardiopulmonary arrest as a complication of GERD. In all patients, surgical repair of the hiatal hernia, together with an antireflux procedure, resulted in complete resolution of the respiratory complaints for follow-up periods up to 160 months. CONCLUSIONS: Our data emphasize the particular prevalence of respiratory involvement in the case of GERD complicating type 2 hiatal hernia, and also the excellent symptomatic results obtained by surgical therapy for this condition.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = reflux
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17/82. Laparoscopic intervention for intrathoracic stomach in infants.

    BACKGROUND: Intrathoracic stomach is an uncommon condition in infants. We report our experience managing such a condition successfully by laparoscopy in four patients. methods: patients' ages at the time of operation ranged from 30 days to 14 months. In all cases, the intrathoracic stomach was easily pulled down into the abdominal cavity. The phrenoesophageal ligament was completely resected, and the enlarged hiatus was narrowed by intraabdominal suturing technique. The esophagus was wrapped with the mobilized fundus in a floppy fundoplication. Anchoring sutures were placed between the wrapping cuff and crura. RESULT: One patient had paraesophageal hernia (type 2), whereas the other had combined hiatal hernia (type 3). No adverse complications were observed in any of the cases. Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux and radiographic recurrence of hernia were not seen in any case. The cosmesis was excellent in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that laparoscopic repair for intrathoracic stomach is a safe and feasible method when preoperative evaluation is conducted adequately.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = reflux
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18/82. Development of Barrett's esophagus after 'spontaneous' healing of atrophic corpus gastritis.

    We report here the case of a 58-year-old asymptomatic male smoker who had a gastroscopy performed in 1990 because of a low serum pepsinogen I level (16 microg/l). The patient had severe atrophic corpus gastritis and elevated helicobacter pylori antibody titers, but no histologic evidence of the bacteria. Additionally, a hiatal hernia without esophagitis was seen. He was followed up endoscopically because of the atypical changes (indefinite for dysplasia) in addition to atrophic gastritis in some of the gastric biopsy samples. During the follow-up period, H. pylori antibody titers declined to normal levels without eradication therapy, and atrophic gastritis healed. The patient developed first erosive esophagitis, and, 5 years later, a 3-cm-long Barrett's esophagus was detected.
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ranking = 4.2396392893329
keywords = esophagitis
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19/82. situs inversus totalis: giant hiatal hernia repair by laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty and Nissen fundoplication.

    We report the repair of a giant hiatal hernia by laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty and Nissen fundoplication in a patient with situs inversus totalis, highlighting the unique anatomic challenges in this case. The 52-year old female patient had Kartageners syndrome, a giant hiatal hernia, and a history of chronic severe gastroesophageal reflux disease with uncontrolled regurgitation. The laparoscopic procedure was accomplished with five ports placed in a mirror-image configuration, reversed from our standard positions. After visual confirmation of the complete reversal of the intraabdominal anatomy, we performed a modified Collis gastroplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Significant technical challenges were encountered intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first of its kind in the literature. The use of advanced laparoscopic techniques is highly adaptable to unusual anatomy. Laparoscopic hiatal hernia surgery is feasible in patients with situs inversus.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = reflux
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20/82. Successful treatment of esophageal cancer with transhiatal esophagectomy after heart transplantation.

    A 55-year-old heart transplant recipient with reflux esophagitis presented for routine endoscopic surveillance of an area of Barrett's metaplasia initially seen 3 years previously. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed adenocarcinoma at 33 cm from the incisors. The preoperative clinical stage was T1N0M0 by endoscopic ultrasound. Transhiatal esophagectomy was performed with R0 resection of the cancer, and the patient recovered uneventfully. Pathologic examination confirmed esophageal adenocarcinoma (T1N0M0) in Barrett's mucosa. The patient is doing well, and has no evidence of disease after 18 months.
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ranking = 2.3698196446665
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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