Cases reported "Hernia, Umbilical"

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1/47. Repair of mild umbilical hernia.

    A mild, persistent umbilical hernia that does not cause any functional problem is often ignored. The authors have devised a new technique to treat the mild, protrusive deformity of the umbilicus without associated complications. In this report, the new operative procedure is introduced. The authors have treated 72 patients with this method and have obtained good results.
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2/47. An accessory lobe of the liver disturbing closure of the umbilical ring.

    The authors report a small omphalocele involving an accessory lobe of the liver (ALL) embedded in a cranial portion of the amniotic sac. The pedicle of liver tissue was markedly elongated. In this case, it was reasonable to assume that the ALL was formed during development of the embryonic body-wall folds and disturbed complete closure of the umbilical ring. Surgical resection of the ALL was performed to avoid its postoperative torsion. The pertinent literature is also reviewed.
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keywords = operative
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3/47. Revision laparoscopy for incarcerated hernia at a 5-mm trocar site following pediatric laparoscopic surgery.

    We report the case of a 6-month-old female infant who developed post-operative bowel obstruction due to an incarcerated hernia through a 5-mm laparoscopic wound. The patient underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux. On day 6, she showed symptoms of ileus, and the diagnosis of a trocar wound hernia was made on day 13. The herniated intestine was reduced and the defective peritoneum and fascia were closed under relaparoscopic guidance, thus avoiding full-scale laparotomy. A trocar wound hernia causing early postoperative bowel obstruction is a rare complication, especially at 5-mm trocar puncture sites. Intraoperative dislodgment and reinsertion of working trocars may create fascial defects larger than the actual size of the trocar. All laparoscopic puncture wounds, even those <10 mm in size, should be closed at the fascial level in infants. Revision laparoscopy is considered preferable to manage trocar site complications in children.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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4/47. Incisional hernia and fascial defect following laparoscopic surgery.

    Complications involving the abdominal wall, particularly incisional hernias, were not expected when laparoscopic procedures were first introduced. With the increasing number of laparoscopies in abdominal surgery, more incisional hernias are observed. The authors report 13 cases of umbilical incisional hernia, which occurred late after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and one case of omental procidentia through a lateral port, which occurred early after laparoscopic hernia repair with the transabdominal preperitoneal technique. There are 4 men and 10 women (mean age, 59.8 years; range, 40-74 years). Between March 1991 and December 1997, a total of 1,287 patients underwent laparoscopic operations at the Surgical Department of the Gradenigo Hospital in Turin, italy. Incisional hernia incidence is 1%. risk factors, such as chronic bronchitis or weight increase, which give rise to endoabdominal pressure, are present in some cases. malnutrition may have a major role in many cases. calculi larger than 15 mm are also seen frequently. Postlaparoscopy incisional hernia is generally a minor complication--only once did its occurrence cause a strangulated hernia. All precautions, including fascial suturing, must be taken to reduce the 1% incidence of postoperative incisional hernias.
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keywords = operative
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5/47. Anaesthetic management of a child with type VIIc ehlers-danlos syndrome.

    ehlers-danlos syndrome type VIIc is characterized by altered tensile strength of connective tissue. Several severe complications exist but skin fragility is the origin of perioperative morbidity during routine procedures. We describe the difficulties encountered during the anaesthetic management of a child suffering from the disease, and suggest special care advices to avoid any skin injury.
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keywords = operative
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6/47. Strangulated umbilical hernia in a child: report of a case.

    Most umbilical hernias in children close spontaneously. Complications associated with umbilical hernias are rarely observed during follow-up. We report herein a 5-month-old girl with a strangulated umbilical hernia. Her umbilicus was hard, reddish, and irreducible. Plain radiography of the abdomen showed signs of mechanical ileus. The patient was thus diagnosed to have a strangulated umbilical hernia. A 5-cm section of the ascending colon and a 5-cm section of the terminal ileum, as well as the cecum and appendix, were congested, edematous, and erythematous, and together were enclosed by a firm hernial ring. A closure of the fascial defect and umbilicoplasty were performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. In patients with infantile umbilical hernias, strangulation may occur as the fascial defect decreases in size.
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keywords = operative
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7/47. Omental herniation through a 3-mm umbilical trocar site: unmasking a hidden umbilical hernia.

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of umbilical hernia following laparoscopic surgery varies from 0.02-3.6%. The incidence of pre-existing fascial defects, however, may be as high as 18% in patients undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Previous recommendations have been made to close any fascial defect greater than or equal to 10 mm. Reported here is a case of herniation through a 3-mm trocar site incision and the discovery of a pre-existing fascial defect. CASE REPORT: A 32-year-old female underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic tubal ligation using a 3-mm umbilical port. Prior to umbilical trocar removal at the completion of the case, the carbon dioxide was evacuated from the abdomen and the sleeve was withdrawn under direct vision. Neither the fascial nor skin incisions were sutured. On postoperative day two, the patient returned with omentum herniating from the 3-mm site. At surgery, a 1.5-cm pre-existing fascial defect was discovered adjacent to the trocar site. The hernia sac tracked laterally to the base of the umbilicus, and the omentum had slid into the sac and out the skin opening. CONCLUSION: As this report illustrates, herniation associated with laparoscopic trocar sites can occur with incisions as small as 3 mm. The presence of pre-existing fascial defects can cause increased morbidity in any laparoscopic surgery, and as illustrated in this report, may predispose the patient to site herniation. The detection and management of these defects is crucial in preventing postlaparoscopic complications.
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keywords = operative
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8/47. pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic surgery: a report of two cases.

    Laparoscopic abdominal surgery is considered a low-risk procedure for postoperative complications because of reduced surgical stress and earlier mobilization. We report two patients who experienced pulmonary embolism following laparoscopic surgery; one patient underwent umbilical hernia repair and the other cholecystectomy. Although pulmonary embolism is indeed rare after laparoscopic surgery, early detection and early treatment are determinative factors for a good prognosis. Therefore, medical caregivers must remember that pulmonary embolism can be a critical complication after laparoscopic surgery and preventive measures should be employed for high-risk subjects.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/47. Parasitic omphalopagus complicated by omphalocele and congenital heart disease.

    Conjoined twins occur in approximately one of every 50,000 to 200,000 births. Atypical or parasitic conjoined twins result from the embryonic death of one twin, which leaves behind body parts vascularized by the primary twin. Omphalopagus refers to conjoined twins joined at the level of the umbilicus. The authors report a case of atypical omphalopagus involving an acardiac, acephalic, parasitic twin and a host twin with a large omphalocele, transposition of the great arteries, and aortic coarctation. The authors briefly review reported cases of parasitic omphalopagus and emphasize the role of intensive neonatal care, preoperative planning, and staged surgical intervention in the successful management of complicated variants.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/47. Treatment of high imperforate anus with large omphalocele in a baby boy.

    Synchronous treatment of high imperforate anus with large omphalocele is a challenge for pediatric surgeon. A case of this unusual condition in a male neonate is presented. The high imperforate anus was repaired by primary one-stage posterior sagittal anorectoplasty, and the omphalocele was treated nonoperatively. Recovery was uneventful.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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