Cases reported "Hernia, Ventral"

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1/97. Laparoscopic retroperitoneal repair of recurrent postoperative lumbar hernia.

    A patient who previously underwent an attempt at open mesh repair of a lumbar hernia that occurred following iliac crest bone harvesting was managed successfully by laparoscopic retroperitoneal fixation of the prosthetic material to the iliac crest using bone screws. A review of the literature supports the use of such a novel approach to manage this often vexing problem.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/97. ileus with incarceration of Spigelian hernia.

    An 85 year-old female with ileus due to incarceration of Spigelian hernia, which was diagnosed pre-operatively with the findings of the abdominal computed tomography and plain radiographic pictures, is reported. A simple hernioplasty was made by suturing the internal oblique and transverse muscles to the rectus sheath. The post-operative condition is satisfactory without any recurrence of hernia.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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3/97. Handlebar hernia: case report and review of pediatric cases.

    The authors describe a rare case of handlebar hernia in a 9-year-old-boy. All layers of his abdominal wall were disrupted by a fall on a bicycle; however, his skin and intra-abdominal organs were completely intact. Computed tomography demonstrated subcutaneous intestinal loops protruding through the rent. Surgical repair was performed, and his postoperative course was uneventful.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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4/97. Dynamic reconstruction of the abdominal wall using a reinnervated free rectus femoris muscle transfer.

    Dynamic reconstruction of the abdominal wall using a free reinnervated rectus femoris muscle and an island tensor fascia lata transfer was performed for a large herniation with loss of the bilateral rectus abdominis muscles of the abdominal wall. The tensor fascia lata transfer was used to close an inner side of the abdominal defect, and the rectus femoris muscle replaced the rectus abdominis muscle deficit. The motor nerve of the rectus femoris muscle was sutured to the motor branch of the intercostal nerve. Postoperatively, the transferred rectus femoris muscle was reinnervated via electromyography, and there was no abdominal protrusion and no hernia recurrence.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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5/97. Giant congenital epigastric hernia.

    Epigastric hernia is rare in children. When it occurs, as in adults, it is usually small. This is a report of a giant, congenital epigastric hernia which was repaired early to prevent complications. Though there was a brief period of postoperative respiratory difficulty, the final outcome was satisfactory. This case is interesting due to its massive size and congenital nature.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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6/97. Large abdominal wall herniae: an easy method of repair without prosthetic material, with the induction of pneumoperitoneum.

    Large abdominal wall herniae may pose problems of management, particularly in the presence of obstructive airway and cardiovascular disease. Preoperative induction of pneumoperitoneum usually permits the anatomical repair of large herniae without complications and without the use of prosthetic materials to close the defect.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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7/97. hernia at 5-mm laparoscopic port site presenting as early postoperative small bowel obstruction.

    A decade has passed since laparoscopy became a popular tool in general surgery. New technologies continue to surface, and surgeons are still trying to expand the applications of this technique. Parallel to the development of new techniques, we are also measuring the presentation of new complications. Incisional hernias are not new complications. Although their avoidance has been one of the proposed benefits of laparoscopy, several cases of port-site hernias have been reported. Current surgical wisdom suggests closure of 10-mm or larger port sites to avoid herniation. Most surgeons do not routinely close 5-mm port sites, believing that such fascial defects are not large enough to create a significant risk of hernia formation, thus not justifying the extra time and effort needed to close them. Although this practice may be reasonable for most cases, it should be reconsidered in lengthy procedures, particularly if the port has been used for active operative instruments. Under these circumstances, the repetitive motions in different directions may cause the 5-mm defect to enlarge significantly, allowing a hernia of considerable size to develop, with the obvious clinical implications of such a complication. We present a case of a hernia through a 5-mm port site presenting as small-bowel obstruction in the early postoperative period after a laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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8/97. Ileal perforation due to a Richter hernia at the drain insertion site following an operation for idiopathic rectal perforation: report of a case.

    A case of a Richter hernia at the insertion site of the drainage tube following open abdominal surgery is reported. A 54-year-old man underwent an emergency operation for an idiopathic rectal perforation. A partial resection of the rectum and drainage using four 10-mm (outer diameter) drainage tubes with round cross sections was performed. Despite an uneventful early postoperative course, an emergency reoperation was required for peritonitis due to a bowel perforation 14 days after removing the drain inserted into the rectosacral space. A laparotomy revealed an incarcerated Richter hernia with ileal perforation through the 10-mm drainage site. The postoperative course after a partial resection of the ileum and drainage with Penrose drains was uneventful. This is the first report of a Richter hernia through the insertion site of a drainage tube in abdominal surgery. The possible occurrence of a Richter hernia in cases with postoperative drainage using large-size round drainage tubes should thus be considered in such patients.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = operative
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9/97. Endoscopically assisted "components separation" for closure of abdominal wall defects.

    The repair of ventral hernia defects of the abdominal wall challenges both general and plastic surgeons. Ventral herniation is a postoperative complication in 10 percent of abdominal surgeries; the repair of such defects has a recurrence rate as high as 50 percent. The "components separation" technique has successfully decreased the recurrence rates of ventral abdominal hernias. However, this technique has been associated with midline dehiscence and a prolonged postoperative stay at the authors' institutions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether endoscopically assisted components separation could minimize operative damage to the vasculature of the abdominal wall and decrease postoperative wound dehiscence. The study group consisted of seven patients who underwent endoscopically assisted components separation; the control group consisted of 30 patients who underwent open components separation. The two groups were similar regarding demographic data and defect size. The endoscopic group had a higher initial success rate than the open group (100 versus 77 percent). recurrence rates were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the endoscopically assisted components separation patients had fewer postoperative and long-term complications. In the authors' experience, endoscopically assisted components separation has proved to be a safe and effective method for the repair of complicated and recurrent midline ventral hernias.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = operative
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10/97. Incisional hernia and fascial defect following laparoscopic surgery.

    Complications involving the abdominal wall, particularly incisional hernias, were not expected when laparoscopic procedures were first introduced. With the increasing number of laparoscopies in abdominal surgery, more incisional hernias are observed. The authors report 13 cases of umbilical incisional hernia, which occurred late after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and one case of omental procidentia through a lateral port, which occurred early after laparoscopic hernia repair with the transabdominal preperitoneal technique. There are 4 men and 10 women (mean age, 59.8 years; range, 40-74 years). Between March 1991 and December 1997, a total of 1,287 patients underwent laparoscopic operations at the Surgical Department of the Gradenigo Hospital in Turin, italy. Incisional hernia incidence is 1%. risk factors, such as chronic bronchitis or weight increase, which give rise to endoabdominal pressure, are present in some cases. malnutrition may have a major role in many cases. calculi larger than 15 mm are also seen frequently. Postlaparoscopy incisional hernia is generally a minor complication--only once did its occurrence cause a strangulated hernia. All precautions, including fascial suturing, must be taken to reduce the 1% incidence of postoperative incisional hernias.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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