Cases reported "Hernia"

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1/3. An endoscopic technique for decompressive fasciotomy.

    A guiding principle of minimally invasive techniques in plastic surgery is improvement of the aesthetic outcome, usually by reducing morbidity from postsurgical scarring. The elimination or reduction of scars has already been so achieved during elevation of fascial flaps and for the harvest of fascial grafts. A natural extension of this endoscopic experience is decompressive fasciotomy, which has now been performed successfully in the upper extremity. Using endoscopic guidance, this is actually a simple, rapid, and safe procedure with minimal morbidity, and should also be apropos for the lower extremity, where compartment syndromes are a more common malady.
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ranking = 1
keywords = decompressive
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2/3. Arachnoid cyst resulting in tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia in a patient with achondroplasia. Case report.

    achondroplasia has been associated with varying degrees of cervicomedullary and spinal compression, although usually in the pediatric population. Large arachnoid cysts have also been found to result in tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia. The authors present the case of a patient with achondroplasia who presented with symptoms of foramen magnum compression and syringomyelia, and who was subsequently found to have a large posterior fossa arachnoid cyst. This 38-year-old woman with achondroplasia presented with an 8-month history of headache and numbness of the hands and fingers. Admission magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the head and spine revealed a large arachnoid cyst in the posterior cranial fossa, a 6-mm tonsillar herniation consistent with an acquired Chiari malformation, and a large cervicothoracic syrinx. The patient was treated using suboccipital craniectomy, C-1 laminectomy, fenestration of the arachnoid cyst, and decompression of the acquired Chiari malformation with duraplasty. Surgical decompression resulted in improvement of the presenting symptoms, adequate decompression of crowding at the foramen magnum, and resolution of the syrinx. Although there was only partial reduction in the retrocerebellar cisternal space on follow-up MR imaging, no residual symptoms were related to this.
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ranking = 0.26673595052239
keywords = craniectomy
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3/3. Herniation of the third ventricle into empty sella caused by surgery for pituitary apoplexy--case report.

    A 46-year-old male presented with acute visual loss in the right eye, high fever, nausea, and vomiting. This was caused by herniation of the third ventricle into empty sella at 15 months of surgery for pituitary apoplexy. The sellar-suprasellar tumor was totally removed via a transcranial approach. Histological examination showed chromophobe adenoma with necrotic tissue, indicating pituitary apoplexy. His visual field defect worsened 15 months after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed moderate hydrocephalus and protrusion of the dilated anterior inferior portion of the third ventricle into the sella. The optic nerve, optic chiasm, and pituitary gland were compressed onto the sellar floor. ventriculoperitoneal shunt relieved the visual impairment. A decompressive procedure such as ventriculoperitoneal shunts is a reasonable treatment for such a marked herniation of the third ventricle.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = decompressive
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