Cases reported "Herpes Zoster"

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1/113. Treatment of postherpetic neuralgia.

    OBJECTIVE: To review treatment options for postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). DATA SOURCES: Clinical literature selected by the authors accessed via medline. Search terms included postherpetic neuralgia, capsaicin, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and lidocaine. STUDY SELECTION: Controlled trials relevant to PHN. DATA SYNTHESIS: Traditional analgesics offer little benefit for the treatment of PHN. The best results for pain relief have come from capsaicin and tricyclic antidepressants. anticonvulsants have also been used, although the number of studies evaluating this is limited. More invasive therapies, such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and nerve blocks, can be considered if other therapies fail. CONCLUSION: early diagnosis and treatment of herpes zoster may offer patients the best chance of preventing the development of PHN. However, if PHN does develop, the patient should seek treatment early for the best chance of pain relief.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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2/113. Acute herpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia in the head and neck: response to gabapentin in five cases.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The clinical presentations and pharmacologic management of three patients with acute herpetic neuralgia (AHN) and two patients with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), confined to the head and neck region, are described. methods: Two patients had pain in the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, two had pain confined to the C2-C4 dermatomes, and one patient had C2 pain with radiating and referred pain to the second and third divisions of the trigeminal nerve. RESULTS: Gabapentin, an anticonvulsant drug, was effective in treating these patients, including the two cases of AHN. All patients reported complete pain relief after titration with gabapentin up to 1,800 mg/d. The patients noted a dose-dependent decrease in pain almost immediately after starting gabapentin. Specifically, reduction in the frequency and intensity of allodynia, burning pain, shooting pain, and throbbing pain were noted. None of the patients experienced side effects from the drug. CONCLUSIONS: In view of the results in these patients, blinded, controlled studies are needed to determine the efficacy of gabapentin for treating AHN and PHN.
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ranking = 202.82015821738
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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3/113. herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve third branch: a case report and review of the literature.

    literature review AND CASE REPORT: A literature review of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is presented. Included are differential diagnosis and treatment modalities that will enable the dental practitioner to identify and manage this disease. A case report is provided to amplify this timely information.
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ranking = 507.05039554346
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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4/113. Acute varicella zoster with postherpetic hyperhidrosis as the initial presentation of hiv infection.

    A 31-year-old man presented with acute pain in his left arm and hemorrhagic vesicles that followed his left 8th cervical nerve. A diagnosis of herpes zoster was made, and the patient was treated with valacyclovir. He refused testing for antibodies to hiv because he denied being at risk. Two months later he returned with postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic hyperhidrosis in the distribution of the vesicles, which had since resolved. serology for hiv at this visit was positive, and the patient admitted to having sexual relations with prostitutes. Six months later the patient was being treated with triple antiretroviral therapy, and all signs and symptoms of postherpetic zoster had resolved. This case report documents the need for hiv testing in patients with unusual presentations of herpes zoster even if they initially deny being at risk.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = nerve
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5/113. Shingles developing within recent surgical scars.

    Occurrence of varicella and recurrence of herpes simplex on traumatized sites of the skin are well-described events. By contrast, herpes zoster occurring specifically at the site of previously injured skin has not yet been reported. Two patients are presented who developed shingles limited to skin on and around recent surgical scars. Varicella zoster virus was identified using immunohistochemistry on skin biopsy specimens and Tzanck smears. We suspect that the occurrence of herpes zoster involving surgical scars is usually misdiagnosed and therefore unrecognized. Whether shingles adjacent to scars represents a coincidental event or is specifically triggered by local injury is unknown.
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ranking = 0.0065330205097415
keywords = injury
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6/113. Delayed facial paralysis after stapedotomy using KTP laser.

    OBJECTIVE: Delayed facial paralysis after stapes surgery is uncommon and has been reported after traditional, nonlaser techniques for stapedotomy. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader of the potential risk of delayed facial nerve paralysis associated with the use of the potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser for stapedotomy. Etiologic mechanisms are discussed. STUDY DESIGN: The study was a descriptive study-case report. SETTING: The study was conducted at a university-based otologic practice. patients: Two patients with otosclerosis and delayed onset facial palsy 5 to 7 days after uncomplicated stapedotomy using the KTP laser were included in the study. INTERVENTION: potassium titanyl phosphate laser stapedotomy was performed. patients received treatment of facial palsy with a tapering course of oral steroids. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: House-Brackmann facial nerve grade scores were used. RESULTS: Improvement of House-Brackmann facial nerve scores from Grade VI to Grade I-II in one patient, and improvement from Grade IV to Grade I-II in the other was seen. CONCLUSION: The probable etiology of delayed facial palsy is viral neuritis from reactivation of dormant virus within the facial nerve, initiated by thermal stress of the KTP laser. Presentation and resolution of the facial palsy is similar to other types of delayed facial palsy resulting from nonlaser techniques of stapes surgery and other types of middle ear and neurotologic surgeries previously reported.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nerve
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7/113. Following the clues to neuropathic pain. Distribution and other leads reveal the cause and the treatment approach.

    Neuropathic pain can seem enigmatic at first because it can last indefinitely and often a cause is not evident. However, heightened awareness of typical characteristics, such as the following, makes identification fairly easy: The presence of certain accompanying conditions (e.g., diabetes, hiv or herpes zoster infection, multiple sclerosis) Pain described as shooting, stabbing, lancinating, burning, or searing Pain worse at night Pain following anatomic nerve distribution Pain in a numb or insensate site The presence of allodynia Neuropathic pain responds poorly to standard pain therapies and usually requires specialized medications (e.g., anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, opioid analgesics) for optimal control. Successful pain control is enhanced with use of a systematic approach consisting of disease modification, local or regional measures, and systemic therapy.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = nerve
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8/113. A study of post-traumatic shingles as a work related injury.

    BACKGROUND: After chicken pox, the herpes varicella-zoster (HVZ) virus may remain dormant in the dorsal root ganglion until later reactivation causes shingles, characterized by painful dysesthesias and cutaneous vesicular eruptions along a unilateral dermatome. Shingles as a work-related injury has not been previously addressed in the medical literature. Case history We present a 50-year old female hospital employee who, while working, sustained an acute, traumatic hyperextension injury to her right wrist, hand, and fingers. Although she initially responded to treatment for flexor tendinitis, she suddenly developed shingles in the right C5-C6 dermatomes. She was treated with famcyclovir and her skin lesions resolved, but post-herpetic neuralgia persisted. CONCLUSIONS: It was felt that her shingles was causally related to her occupational injury since trauma (previously reported to precipitate shingles) was her only risk factor and the timing and location of the lesions corresponded closely to the occupational injury. In addition to appropriately diagnosing and treating their patients, workers' compensation physicians often must determine if a particular condition was caused by the original work-related incident. Clinicians who treat trauma patients and injured workers should be aware of post-traumatic shingles and understand the causal relationship of this uncommon but clinically important phenomenon.
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ranking = 0.052264164077932
keywords = injury
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9/113. Recurrent disseminated herpes zoster and cytomegalic perianal ulcer: a case report and review of the literature.

    We describe a patient with lymphocytic leukemia who developed multiple, disseminated, vesiculopustular eruptions in combination with perianal ulcer. Four years earlier, she had a herpes zoster (HZ) infection involving the ophthalmic division of her left trigeminal nerve with subsequent postherpetic neuralgia that was treated with steroids. After the studies, we concluded that the patient had a recurrent disseminated HZ infection and perianal ulcer caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV).
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ranking = 101.41007910869
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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10/113. herpes zoster of the maxillary branch of the trigeminus nerve. Virological and serological studies.

    A 70-year-old male had erythematous and vesiculous lesions in the area of the right maxillary branch of the trigeminus nerve and was clinically diagnosed as having herpes zoster; virological and serological investigations of this case were carried out. Consequently, an electron microscopic observation revealed a great number of virus particles of herpes type in the vesiculous lesion and in baby hamster kidney BHK21/WI-21 cells, cultured after inoculating the fluid from the vesicle formed on the patient's upper lip or from serum harvested during the viremia. When BHK21/WI-21 cells infected with this virus were tested for antigenicity by an indirect immunofluorescent staining technique, they showed a positive staining to antivaricella-zoster virus. When serum of this patient was assayed fof the antibody level against varicella-zoster virus by the complement fixation test at various time intervals during the therapeutic period, this antibody titer on recovery period showed a threefold increase in comparison to that at onset. From these findings, this infectious disease was precisely diagnosed as herpes zoster.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = nerve
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