Cases reported "Herpes Zoster"

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1/17. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia for postherpetic neuralgia in an hiv-infected patient as a therapeutic ambulatory modality.

    A 43-year-old hiv-positive male was referred to our pain clinic one month after his fourth attack of herpes zoster infection. He complained of intermittent intolerable sharp and lancinating pain accompanied by numbness over the inner aspect of the left upper extremity, left anterior chest wall and the back. physical examination revealed allodynia over the left T1 and T2 dermatomes without any obvious skin lesion. The pain was treated with epidural block made possible by a retention epidural catheter placed via the T2-3 interspace. After the administration of 8 ml of 1% lidocaine in divided doses, the pain was completely relieved for 4 h without significant change of blood pressure or heart rate. A pump (Baxter API) for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) filled with 0.08% bupivacaine was connected to the epidural catheter on the next day and programmed at a basal rate of 2 ml/h, PCA dose 2 ml, lockout interval 15 min, with an one-hour dose limit of 8 ml. He was instructed to report his condition by telephone every weekday. The pump was refilled with drug and the wound of catheter entry was checked and managed every 3 or 4 days. The epidural catheter was replaced every week. During treatment, the pain intensity was controlled in the range from 10 to 0-2 on the visual analogue scale. He was very satisfied with the treatment and reported only slight hypoesthesia over the left upper extremity in the early treatment period. Epidural PCA was discontinued after 28 days. He did not complain of pain thereafter but reported a slight numb sensation still over the lesion site for a period of time. In conclusion, postherpetic neuralgia in an hiv-infected man was successfully treated with ambulatory therapeutic modality of epidural PCA for 28 days.
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keywords = retention
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2/17. Herpes zoster producing temporary erectile dysfunction.

    Varicella Zoster affecting the sacral dermatomes is a rare but well recognised cause of urinary retention. Only one case of erectile dysfunction associated with Varicella Zoster has previously been described, which was longstanding, but no cases of transient erectile dysfunction following Zoster infection are recorded. We present one such case.
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ranking = 31.696686536349
keywords = urinary retention, retention
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3/17. Herpes zoster induced neuropathic bladder--a case report.

    Herpes zoster infection involving the sacral dermatomes has been associated with bladder dysfunction and, although rarely, with acute urinary retention. Less than 150 cases have been reported in the literature. After reviewing our institute's chart records covering a period of time dating from 1991 to 2001, we found that three of our patients had developed acute urinary retention following herpes zoster skin lesions of the S2-4 dermatomes. Herein we report our findings. These three patients had previously been found to have normal voiding status. However, at the time of complaint urodynamic studies revealed detrusor areflexia or detrusor hyporeflexia with decreased sensation of bladder filling. After micturation recovery, repeat urodynamic studies revealed detrusor pressure and bladder sensation recovery. After one to six weeks of treatment, all three patients could void spontaneously without catheterization. We found that, when treated with antiviral medication, supportive analgesics, and temporary urinary drainage, which included urethral catheterization and suprapubic cystostomy, acute urinary retention associated with herpes zoster has a generally favorable prognosis. In other words, we found that in spite of its rarity, herpes zoster induced neuropathic bladder dysfunction is reversible when treated appropriately.
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ranking = 95.090059609046
keywords = urinary retention, retention
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4/17. Loss of urinary voiding sensation due to herpes zoster.

    A case of sacral herpes zoster infection in a 56-year-old man with the complication of loss of urinary voiding sensation is presented. He had typical herpes zoster eruption on the left S2 dermatome, hypalgesia of the S1-S4 dermatomes, and absence of urinary voiding sensation. There was no other urinary symptom at the first medical examination. Urinary complications associated with herpes zoster are uncommon, but two types, acute cystitis and acute retention, have been recognized. No cases of loss of urinary voiding sensation due to herpes zoster have been reported. In this case, hypalgesia of the sacral dermatomes was mild compared to the marked loss of urethral sensation. This inconsistency is explained by the hypothesis that the number of urethral fibers is very small as compared to that of cutaneous fibers, therefore, urethral sensation would be more severely disturbed than cutaneous sensation.
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5/17. Herpes zoster infection: a rare cause of acute urinary retention.

    Herpes zoster (HZ) infection has been reported as a rare cause of acute urinary retention. HZ infection involving sacral, thoracolumbar, and rarely high thoracic dermatomes is believed to occasionally cause motor and sensory neuropathy of the bladder. This is specifically achieved by the interruption of the detrusor reflex causing subsequent bladder atonia. As the course and management of this entity is quite benign, HZ should remain a diagnostic consideration in the management of urinary retention. We report a case of acute urinary retention of approximately 2.5 liters associated with HZ infection and review the proposed pathogenesis and therapeutic considerations in the management of this entity.
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ranking = 221.87680575444
keywords = urinary retention, retention
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6/17. Hiccups, eructation, and other uncommon prodromal manifestations of herpes zoster.

    Although the most frequent presentation of herpes zoster involves sensory neurons, motor and autonomic symptomatology is also known to occur in this disease. An unusual symptom of hiccups is described here. Other infrequent manifestations of this common illness, including the Ramsay Hunt syndrome, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, urinary and fecal retention, sexual dysfunction, and zoster sine herpete, are reviewed. Greater awareness of unusual presentations of herpes zoster is necessary for proper diagnosis and timely management of complications that may otherwise lead to disability and serious long-term sequelae.
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keywords = retention
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7/17. Acute urinary retention attributable to sacral herpes zoster.

    Acute urinary retention in women is uncommon. A 63 year old woman presented with suprapubic pain, a palpable bladder, and multiple grouped vesicles on the right buttock. Catheterisation showed a residual of 2000 ml. A case is reported of acute urinary retention secondary to herpes zoster infection of the sacral nerves (S2-4).
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ranking = 190.18011921809
keywords = urinary retention, retention
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8/17. Unusual manifestations of herpes zoster. A clinical and electrophysiological study.

    The literature on complicated herpes zoster is summarized in this paper. The case histories of 18 patients with herpes zoster are presented. Two patients had encephalitis, 2 had myelitis and the other 14 patients had various types of lower motor neurone disturbance. Both patients with encephalitis--one of who developed choreo-athetosis during the illness--recovered fully. Only 1 of the 2 patients with myelitis recovered fully; the other remains severely paraparetic and the reason for her incomplete recovery may be related to the presence of generalized arteriolar disease associated with seronegative rheumatoid disease. One patient developed a guillain-barre syndrome 3 weeks after the onset of herpes zoster. Recovery in the 15 patients with lower motor neurone involvement has been slow butcomplete--or almost complete--in all but 1, a patient with persistent facial weakness as part of the Ramsay Hunt syndrome and who also had weakness of one upper limb. Seven other patients had lower limb weakness. In 2 patients the weakness was confined to abdominal myotomes and 2 other patients had urinary retention. Electromyographic abnormalities were found in the muscles which were weak and frequently also in muscles which appeared strong. It is emphasized that neurological disturbances other than sensory abnormalities may be found in patients with herpes zoster. Motor complications of various types are not uncommon.
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ranking = 31.696686536349
keywords = urinary retention, retention
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9/17. Neurologic complications of liver transplantation.

    Nineteen adult patients underwent 21 orthotopic liver transplants at the Cleveland Clinic between November 1984, and August 1986. Eight of 19 (42%) patients developed seizures. One patient suffered a single seizure, and seven patients had multiple, generalized seizures. Two of these seven patients became comatose after several days of seizure activity. Over several weeks, both of these patients regained consciousness--however, they exhibited a cerebellar-type syndrome, manifested as severe ataxia, weakness, and dysarthria. Both patients have improved, but remain neurologically impaired. Laboratory evaluation included serum electrolytes, magnesium, osmolality, and cyclosporine levels. Neurologic testing consisted of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, computed tomographic (CT) scanning, and electroencephalography (EEG). Although the CSF protein was mildly elevated in two patients, all cultures remained sterile. None of the CT scans demonstrated any abnormalities. In five patients, the EEG showed generalized slowing consistent with diffuse encephalopathy. Other factors associated with seizures in transplant patients were analyzed, including fluid retention, hypertension, high-dose steroids, hypomagnesemia, graft dysfunction, and demyelinization. Many of our patients had the first three of these factors, since all but one developed their seizures within the first ten postoperative days. Only one patient had mild hypomagnesemia. Trough cyclosporine levels (whole blood, HPLC) were not in the toxic range (greater than 500 ng/mL). The serum osmolality was elevated in all four patients in whom it was measured, ranging from 309 to 341 mOsm/kg. Only three patients exhibited graft dysfunction--two moderate and one severe. The cause of neurologic toxicity following transplantation is unclear. Although many factors have been implicated, no common denominator has emerged. Several reports have linked cyclosporine with seizures and other neurologic problems, such as the cerebellar-type syndrome exhibited in two of our patients. Future studies should include magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the head and measuring osmolality and cyclosporine levels in the blood and CSF.
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keywords = retention
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10/17. paralysis in herpes zoster.

    Herpes zoster is a relatively common disease which affects predominantly the middle-aged and elderly. The segmentally distributed cutaneous eruption, sensory changes, and pain make up the well known zoster syndrome. Motor loss is another aspect of this syndrome which is less well known but occurs in a significant number of cases, and is probably far more frequent than is recognised because the weakness is readily obscured by pain. Four cases of herpes zoster with motor involvement are described. Two cases had zoster paresis affecting the arm and hand, and one of these had, in limb, and one case had urinary retention owing to an atonic bladder. These cases serve to illustrate many of the clinical features of the zoster syndrome with motor involvement. The significant functional implications of unrecognised motor deficit, particularly in the elderly, are a prominent feature and highlight the importance of early accurate diagnosis and management. The pathogenesis and clinical features of this syndrome are discussed in the literature review.
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ranking = 31.696686536349
keywords = urinary retention, retention
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