Cases reported "Hiccup"

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1/9. Intractable hiccup: an odd complication after laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Intractable hiccup can be an unbearable circumstance and its treatment is often frustrating. More than 100 causes for hiccup have been described in the literature; the most common cause is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We report a case of a 31-year-old patient who suffered from intractable hiccup starting 3 weeks after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD, a potential surgical complication that has not been described. After frustrating medical treatment, the patient underwent computed tomography and nerve stimulator-guided blockade of vagal and phrenic nerves on each side separately. hiccup ceased only after blockade of the right phrenic nerve with 4 ml/h l% ropivacaine and relapsed soon after discontinuation. He underwent thoracoscopic right phrenicectomy, which rendered him symptom free for well over 2 months, at the time of this writing.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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2/9. A renal transplant patient with intractable hiccups and review of the literature.

    Intractable hiccups in transplanted patients may be caused by various medical conditions including infections. We report a case of a 44-year-old man who suffered from intractable hiccups after cadaveric kidney transplantation. We identified 3 different hiccup periods with different causes: 1) steroid and anesthetics use, 2) severe ulcerose herpetic and mycotic esophagitis, and 3) pleuropneumonia caused by nosocomial methicillin-resistant staphylococcus epidermidis and pulmonary abscess requiring thoracic surgery.
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ranking = 7.5419065385708
keywords = esophagitis
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3/9. Protracted hiccups due to severe erosive esophagitis: a case series.

    BACKGROUND: Hiccups although a common annoyance of life, have been linked with significant morbidity and even death. There are numerous causes of prolonged hiccups, including diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Hiccups are reported to represent an atypical manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. CASES: We report 4 cases of prolonged hiccups in patients who failed to respond to initial treatment with abortive neurologic medications and who subsequently improved on proton-pump inhibitors. Endoscopic examination revealed severe reflux esophagitis. CONCLUSION: Hiccups are an atypical manifestation and may represent a more severe course of gastroesophageal reflux disease.
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ranking = 38.309532692854
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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4/9. Hiccups and related esophageal motor disorders.

    The clinical course of a patient with pyrosis and intractable hiccups is presented. Hiccups persisted six years after an effective fundoplication had cured pyrosis, and the patient was eventually treated with baclofen. Esophageal function during and after hiccups was studied in detail by means of esophageal manometry and 24-hour-pH monitoring. The relationship between hiccups and gastro-esophageal reflux is discussed.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = reflux
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5/9. Hiccups: esophageal manometric features and relationship to gastroesophageal reflux.

    gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been reported to be a cause of hiccups. Conversely, some reports state that hiccups cause or adversely affect GER disease. There have been few descriptions in the literature of what hiccups do to esophageal motility. We present a patient with long-standing symptomatic GER and intractable hiccups. Esophageal manometry during hiccups showed absence of LES pressure and absence of peristaltic activity in the esophageal body in response to swallowing, factors which could aggravate GER. Esophageal motility in the absence of hiccups was normal. Antireflux surgery in our patient relieved heartburn but not hiccups. Based on our case and a review of the literature, we believe that clinicians should be cautious in recommending antireflux surgery to treat hiccups in patients with both hiccups and heartburn.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = reflux
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6/9. Hiccups and gastroesophageal reflux: cause and effect?

    Chronic hiccups may be a problem of great significance to the affected patient. A 62-year-old man with severe heartburn and persistent hiccups despite numerous diagnostic tests and therapeutic drug trials presented to our clinic. Esophageal motility and intraluminal pH studies demonstrated decreases in intraesophageal pressure during hiccups and acid exposure during 68% of the measured time. The patient underwent Nissen fundoplication, which improved his heartburn but not his hiccups. The association between gastroesophageal reflux and hiccups is discussed. Our experience suggests that the presence of hiccups and gastroesophageal reflux in the same patient may be coincidental rather than having a cause-and-effect relationship.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = reflux
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7/9. Hiccups associated with reflux esophagitis.

    A 67-yr-old man with protracted hiccups, as well as reflux esophagitis and a stricture, was found to have heartburn and water brash only during episodes of hiccups. Intraesophageal pH monitoring showed acid gastroesophageal reflux increased during these episodes and decreased with cessation of hiccups. After all attempts failed to relieve his hiccups, a Nissen fundoplication relieved heartburn, healed the esophagitis, and stopped excessive reflux of acid gastric juice, even though the hiccups persisted. These observations showed that reflux provoked by prolonged hiccups could either have adversely affected preexistent reflux esophagitis and stricture or conceivably could have caused these complications.
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ranking = 54.593345769995
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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8/9. Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux.

    Hiccups (singultus) are most often a transient phenomenon that resolves without medical therapy. Intractable hiccups can be an indication of a serious underlying disease process and should be investigated. To demonstrate the evaluation of intractable singultus, we describe a patient who had unsuccessful outpatient therapy for persistent hiccups and who was subsequently found to have gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Efforts to determine the cause of the hiccups were negative except for endoscopically proven GER. On follow-up visits, antisingultus medications were withdrawn without return of hiccups, and repeat endoscopy showed substantial healing of the esophagitis. We conclude that GER may be underestimated as a cause of hiccups.
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ranking = 8.5419065385708
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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9/9. Short report: severe hiccups secondary to doxycycline-induced esophagitis during treatment of malaria.

    A 51-year-old man who was treated with quinine and doxycycline for plasmodium falciparum malaria acquired in West africa developed hiccups soon after his first dose of antimalarial therapy. Endoscopic examination performed when his hiccups became intractable showed an esophageal erosion and ulcer most likely due to doxycycline. The patient's symptoms resolved on treatment with omeprazole and sucralfate.
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ranking = 30.167626154283
keywords = esophagitis
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