Cases reported "Hip Dislocation"

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11/112. Non-operative management of central fracture-dislocations of the hip.

    Thirty-eight patients with central fracture-dislocations, seen over a seven-year period and all treated non-operatively, were evaluated. A follow-up study was done on twenty-four patients; the remainder had either died or could not be located. Several techniques were used to maintain the reduction obtained by closed manipulation done under anesthesia. The superiority of the method of traction using pins in the distal and proximal lateral parts of the femur and the importance of prolonged traction were demonstrated.
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keywords = fracture
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12/112. Dislocation of the hip associated with fracture of the femoral head.

    With increasing numbers of road traffic accidents, dislocation of the hip associated with fracture of the femoral head is becoming more common. Seven cases are presented. Treatment of this injury is difficult but it is suggested that conservative methods should be considered initially. Long-term follow-up is necessary as many of these patients develop late complications.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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13/112. Periacetabular osteotomy for stabilization of recurrent post-traumatic dislocation of the hip.

    This article reports on the case of a twenty-eight-year-old woman who developed recurrent hip dislocation after open reduction and internal fixation of a posterior wall hip fracture-dislocation with an associated femoral head fracture. Because of the posterior wall deficiency, a modified periacetabular osteotomy was performed to stabilize the hip. At the two-year follow-up, there was no evidence of osteonecrosis in the remaining femoral head and the joint space was maintained. There has been no recurrence of dislocation. This procedure may be indicated in a patient with an unreconstructable posterior wall deficiency and persistent instability after a traumatic hip dislocation.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = fracture
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14/112. Lumbar nerve root avulsions with secondary ipsilateral hip dysplasia in a child.

    We report on an 8-year-old child with avulsions of the left L3, L4 and L5 nerve roots and traumatic meningoceles that were not associated with lumbar spine or pelvic girdle fractures. The patient had a history of a road traffic accident. Plain radiographs of the pelvis revealed left hip dysplasia. The magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine are illustrated. The pathogenesis of lumbar nerve root avulsions and their association with ipsilateral hip dysplasia are discussed.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = fracture
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15/112. Spontaneous fusion of 'os acetabuli' after triple pelvic osteotomy.

    In acetabular dysplasia, an overloading of the acetabular rim can cause a stress fracture, creating an 'os acetabuli', or a lesion of the acetabular labrum. At puberty, the os acetabuli seems to be the epiphysis of the os pubis. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl with acetabular dysplasia and spontaneous fusion of an 'os acetabuli' after biomechanical correction by triple pelvic osteotomy. Our report supports the correctness of the biomechanical principle: reorientation of the acetabulum results in a better coverage of the femoral head, reduces the stress at the acetabular rim, shifts the os acetabuli out of the stress region, and may allow union of the bony fragment with the acetabulum.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = fracture
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16/112. Traumatic dislocation of hip joint with fracture of shaft of femur on the same side.

    Four cases of traumatic dislocation of the hip joint with fracture of the shaft of femur on the same side, and one case of bilateral hip joint dislocation with a fracture of shaft of femur on one side are reported. Pitfalls in diagnosis and hazards of delayed treatment are emphasized. methods of treatment are outlined. Complications such as avascular necrosis of the head of the femur and sciatic nerve palsy are discussed. Avascular necrosis of the head of the femur is not inevitable even after reduction of the joint has been delayed for several days.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = fracture
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17/112. Successful open reduction of a 5-month-old hip dislocation associated with a femoral head fracture.

    The long-term prognosis after open reduction of neglected posterior hip dislocations is poor; as such, primary arthroplasty is recommended by a number of authors. We present a patient with a 5-month-old posterior hip dislocation with concomitant paralysis of the sciatic nerve who had an open reduction. At a follow-up of 3.5 years, the patient has normal function with no signs of arthrosis. magnetic resonance imaging scans, however, revealed partial avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A discussion based on the literature shows the uniqueness of this case.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = fracture
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18/112. Bilateral obturator dislocation of the hip.

    A case of a traumatic bilateral obturator dislocation of the hip and right side acetabular fracture in a 23-year-old man is presented. The patient was managed conservatively. After follow-up time of 24 months, the result was excellent. The importance of a pelvic radiograph and physical examination of the extremities after significant major trauma are emphasized.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = fracture
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19/112. Acetabular labrum entrapment following traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip.

    In traumatic dislocation of the hip with or without a fracture of the acetabular rim, complete anatomical reduction might be prevented by a bone fragment or infrequently by a soft tissue block, such as a torn acetabular labrum, ruptured capsule, or round ligament. We report a rare case of a tear in the acetabular labrum that prevented complete reduction of the dislocated hip. A 26-year-old man suffered posterior dislocation of the right hip, which was reduced under general anesthesia. The postreduction radiograph showed that the reduction was not complete, and a thin bony fragment was observed in the joint space in the weight-bearing area. Open reduction was performed 11 days later. We found a free bone fragment in the joint space, which was removed. The postoperative radiograph still did not show complete reduction of the hip. A large defect in the contrast medium was shown in the widened joint space by arthrography, which revealed the existence of the soft tissue interposition. We then performed a second operation and learned that the acetabular labrum was widely detached from the anterior to the posterior acetabular rim and was lying deep within the acetabulum. This detached portion of the labrum was excised, and the hip was reduced. The radiograph obtained during surgery then showed complete, concentric reduction. We missed the diagnosis clinically and radiologically at the first operation, proving how important it is to obtain an accurate radiological diagnosis in the operating room.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = fracture
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20/112. Traumatic coxa vera. A case report of spontaneous correction in a child.

    Residual coxa vara is a common complication of femoral neck fracture in a child. Factors favoring the development of this complication are delayed reduction and avascular necrosis. The present case report is a 10-year follow-up of spontaneous correction of traumatic coxa vara in a child. This is of interest because residual coxa vara following a hip fracture in an adult is a deformity in which there is little if any corrective remodeling.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = fracture
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