Cases reported "Hodgkin Disease"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/241. Hodgkin's disease of the esophagus: report of a case.

    Most esophageal malignancies are either squamous carcinomas or adenocarcinomas arising in the background of Barrett's esophagus. We describe a case of an 85-yr-old woman in whom the diagnosis of esophageal malignancy was difficult to confirm despite its endoscopic appearance and previous biopsies. This case illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing Hodgkin's disease of the esophagus. Despite the rarity of this entity, if clinically indicated by symptoms, large, deep biopsies by rigid esophagoscopy should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = malignancy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/241. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurring as a second malignancy: report of a case and review of literature.

    Secondary leukemias occurring after the treatment of childhood malignancies are most often acute nonlymphoblastic leukemias. Only rarely do acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL) occur as second malignancies. An 18-year-old boy who developed ALL 4 years after Hodgkin's disease is described and the literature on secondary ALL is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = malignancy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/241. Secondary hemochromatosis as a long-term complication of the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

    The increased cure rate of hematologic malignancies including the use of bone marrow transplantation has focused attention on the chronic toxicity and quality of life of the survivors. We have observed five patients who have been diagnosed with clinically significant iron overload, presumably due to packed red blood cell transfusions, >/=12 months after transplant for a hematologic malignancy. In these patients, there is no history of veno-occlusive disease or family history of hemochromatosis. The allotransplant patient has been free of chronic graft versus host disease. family screening has been negative. No patient developed clinically significant endocrinopathy, arthropathy, or cardiac disease. The patients have been treated with phlebotomy to bring the transferrin saturation and ferritin levels to normal. The long-term follow-up of patients treated for a hematologic malignancy should include analysis of hepatitis c virus and iron status. This may prevent the development of clinically significant chronic liver disease and possibly malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = malignancy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/241. Acute leukemia following prolonged cytotoxic agent therapy.

    1. Nine patients in whom acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) developed following prolonged alkylating agent therapy are described. Five of the patients received no radiotherapy. The conditions treated were: Hodgkin's disease (four patients), primary amyloidosis, primary macroglobulinemia, malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and carcinoma of the tonsil. 2. Prior to the advent of chemotherapy, this complication was not observed in large series of patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and multiple myeloma. However, the medical literature now contains at least 125 other detailed reports of ANLL developing after prolonged cytotoxic agent therapy. 3. multiple myeloma and Hodgkin's disease, both of which commonly have good responses to chemotherapy, predominate as the underlying diseases. However, 35% of the case reports involve patients with other illnesses, including 12 patients who did not have neoplasms. 4. More than half of the patients developing ANLL have received chemotherapy alone without radiotherapy. 5. At least half of the patients developing ANLL experienced long periods of significant cytopenia during therapy, often with documentation of bone marrow dysplasia. 6. The wide variety of drugs associated with this complication suggests that any cytotoxic agent may be leukemogenic. However, alkylating agents overwhelmingly predominate as the class of compounds which are most often associated with terminal ANLL. 7. The vast majority of patients reported in the literature with ANLL complicating underlying malignancies have received cytotoxic drugs for prolonged periods (median 3 1/2 years) and leukemia developed most commonly 3 to 5 years after the diagnosis of the underlying disease. Most of these patients benefited from therapy and survived longer (median 5 years) than historical control of untreated patients. 8. The leukemogenic potential in man of prolonged cytotoxic agents therapy, especially with alkylating agents, seems to be well established. This evidence admonishes against the prolonged use of these drugs in non-fatal disorders. 9. More accurate assessment of risk: benefit ratios awaits the results of prospective controlled studies. The results of these studies could also lead to significant modifications in recommendations for long-term maintenance therapy with cytotoxic agents.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.779923065757
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/241. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma with Reed-Sternberg-like cells of B-cell phenotype and genotype associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    We report three cases of nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) with Reed-Sternberg-like (RS-like) cells of B-cell pheno- and/or genotype. Histologic analysis in all cases revealed diffuse nodal effacement by atypical lymphoid cells of variable size. Two of the three cases had features of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILT). Large mononuclear and binucleated cells with prominent eosinophilic nucleoli and abundant cytoplasm resembling classic RS cells and mononuclear variants were scattered throughout all biopsies. The lymphoma cells in the three cases were of T-cell lineage (CD3 , CD43 , and CD45RO ). The RS-like cells from all cases were CD30 and CD15 positive. In contrast to the neoplastic T cells, the RS-like cells lacked all T-cell markers and in two cases were positive for CD20. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and EBER 1 (2/2) were detected in the RS-like cells in all cases. The neoplastic T cells were negative for EBV. polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis demonstrated clonal rearrangements of the T-cell receptor gamma chain gene in the three cases. PCR analysis of microdissected RS-like cells for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements in cases 1 and 3 showed an oligoclonal pattern. The presence of RS-like cells in PTCL represents a diagnostic pitfall, because in one case this observation led to a misdiagnosis of Hodgkin's disease (HD). The oligoclonal expansion of EBV-infected cells may be related to underlying immunodeficiency associated with T-cell lymphomas and AILT in particular. This phenomenon may provide the basis for some cases of Hodgkin's disease after T-cell lymphomas and suggests that they are clonally unrelated neoplasms. The expression of LMP1 appears to be crucial for the immunophenotype and probably for the morphology of the RS and RS-like cells appearing in diverse lymphoid malignancies, including HD, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and PTCL.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.779923065757
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/241. Third malignancy after treatment of Hodgkin's disease.

    We present a case of 36-year-old man who was treated for IIB supradiaphragmatic lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease in 1972 (at the age of 11). The patient remained relapse-free after combined radiotherapy (irradiation of the right supraclavicular field) and chemotherapy (six MOPP cycles) and a 3-year supporting chemotherapy (Velbe). In 1993 he underwent spinal cord surgery for a right-sided "hour glass" schwannoma at C4-5 level. In 1996 a large formation histologically verified as "chondrosarcoma" occurred in the right supraclavicular and axillary regions. The pathogenesis of the second and third malignancies may be attributed to the histologic pattern of HD with long-term survival and increased cumulative risk, non-alternating MOPP courses and continued supporting therapy and radiotherapy given to the involved fields.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = malignancy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/241. Thymic Hodgkin's disease--a histological and immunohistochemical study of three cases.

    Thymic Hodgkin's disease (HD) shows some peculiar histological features different from nodal disease which are a result of the interaction with the specific thymic microenvironment. We describe the histological and immunohistochemical findings in three cases presenting as a primary thymic neoplasm both clinically and radiologically. Histological hallmarks were the prominent formation of epithelium-lined cysts, inflammatory changes, a marked proliferation of thymic epithelium in association with Hodgkin- and Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and the occurrence of the nodular sclerosing subtype in all cases. The immunophenotype of the neoplastic cells was that of classical HD. They expressed CD30, CD15 and lacked CD45. In two cases CD20 expression was observed. All cases were negative for the latent membrane protein (LMP) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The accompanying inflammatory infiltrate was rich in mature T-cells, but also showed a significant number of B-cells with frequent formation of follicles and proliferation of follicular dendritic cells. Thymic HD develops in a microenvironment with features of thymic medulla as defined by the morphology and pattern of the proliferating epithelial cells and the mature immunophenotype of the admixed thymocytes. These findings, especially the CD20 positivity in Hodgkin and RS-cells, may point to the possible origin of thymic HD from medullary B-cells.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.779923065757
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/241. Classical Hodgkin's disease and follicular lymphoma originating from the same germinal center B cell.

    PURPOSE: Classical Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma occasionally occur in the same patient. To clarify whether these different diseases share a common precursor cell, we analyzed the immunoglobulin rearrangements in tumor cells of the classical Hodgkin's disease and the follicular lymphoma that developed in the same patient 2 years apart. patients AND methods: polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of rearranged immunoglobulin genes was carried out on single reed-sternberg cells and on whole tissue dna extracted from the follicular lymphoma. PCR products were sequenced and compared with each other and with germ line immunoglobulin variable segments. Immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain transcripts were analyzed by radioactive in-situ hybridization. RESULTS: The same monoclonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement was found in both neoplasms. The variable region of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes of the Reed-Sternberg and of the follicular lymphoma cells were differently mutated, but six somatic mutations were shared by both lymphoma cells. Although the coding capacity of the immunoglobulin genes was preserved in both neoplastic cell populations, immunoglobulin heavy- (mu) and light- (kappa) chain expression was restricted to the follicular lymphoma cells, except for small amounts of kappa light-chain mRNA in some reed-sternberg cells. CONCLUSIONS: The neoplastic cells of the Hodgkin's disease and the follicular lymphoma that occurred in this patient derived from a common precursor B cell. Its differentiation stage could be identified as that of a germinal center B cell. Thus, transforming events can be more important than the cell of origin in determining a disease entity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.779923065757
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/241. Hodgkin's disease and myelomonocytic leukemia: an ultrastructural and immunocytochemical study.

    The ultrastructual and immunologic features of the initial Reed-Sternberg and Hodgkin cells are compared with the ultimate leukemic cell type in a child with Hodgkin's disease who subsequently developed acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMML) following 29 months of chemotherapy. Hodgkin tumor cells contained cytoplasmic IgG and ultrastructurally resembled large immunoblasts, containing one or two round nuclei with large bizarre nucleoli, many polyribosomes, sparase endoplasmic reticulum, underdeveloped Golgi lamellae, and few cytoplasmic granules. The Hodgkin tumor cells displayed no evidence of phagocytosis. The leukemic monocytic cells did not contain cytoplasmic IgG and, ultrastrucally, exhibited and indented and irregular nuclear profile with less prominent nucleoli, numerous pleomorphic granules, a moderate number of free ribosomes, short segments of endoplasmic reticulum, and stacked Golgi lamellae. The cell surface was irregular and occasionally appeared involved in endocytic activity. These results indicate that the Hodgkin tumor cells originated from B lymphocytes rather than tissue macrophages, whereas the leukemic monocytes arose from the bone marrow-derived monocyte-macrophage series. The findings suggest further that AMML developing after Hodgkin's disease consitutes a second neoplasm rather than a leukemic transformation of Hodgkin tumor cells.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.779923065757
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/241. Kaposi sarcoma after treatment of Hodgkin's disease in a young adult non-AIDS patient: case report and review.

    We describe a young woman diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease, stage I, at age 20 years. She delayed treatment until age 23, at which time she was considered to have stage II-A disease and was then treated with chemotherapy and involved field irradiation. Two years later, Kaposi sarcoma, which developed on her right shoulder, was excised. Both the Hodgkin's disease and Kaposi sarcoma appeared to be cured, but 3 years later, acute myelogenous leukemia developed and the patient subsequently died in relapse. This is one of the very few instances of a young patient, not infected with the AIDS virus, in whom Kaposi sarcoma developed as a second malignancy after treatment of Hodgkin's disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = malignancy
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hodgkin Disease'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.